Reformation & Puritan Bible Commentaries

In the order of the books of the Bible.
This is part of the best and largest collection of Bible commentaries online:

Bible Commentaries

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“By all means read the Puritans, they are worth more than all the modern stuff put together.”

“…[This work] is of the critical and grammatical school, and bristles all over with the names of the German band.  We prefer the Puritanic gold to the German silver which is now in fashion.”

Charles H. Spurgeon

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Order of Contents

Introduction
The Best Commentary Ever Written on the Bible
Whole Bible Commentaries  17
Whole Old Testament  3
.       Pentateuch  48+
.       Historical Books  18
.       Poetic Books
.                Job-Psalms  116+
.                Prov-Song  50+
.       Major Prophets  27
.       Minor Prophets  45
Whole New Testament  6
.       Life of Christ  26+
.       Gospels  36+
.       Acts  8
.       The Epistles  2
.                Rom-2 Cor  45+
.                Gal-Col  30
.                1 Thess-Titus  26
.                Phile-Heb  20
.                General Epistles  40+
.       Revelation  58

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Introduction

Why read Reformation and puritan Bible commentaries?

While contemporary commentaries have their benefits (they are typically more uniform, focus on exegesis, bring in archaeology, have updated research, etc.), they are, as a whole (with few exceptions), seriously deficient in deep, savory, godliness.  They will feed you information, but not your eternal soul.  

On the other hand, in reading older puritan commentaries from the Reformation age, one not only grows in knowledge, but finds depths of soul-stirring communion with our Eternal and Beloved God.

This collection of 620+ Bible commentaries includes:

– Every Reformation age or puritan commentary that Charles Spurgeon mentioned in his book: Commenting and Commentaries (1876);

– Every relevant commentary referenced by Dr. Richard Muller in his survey of the major Reformation and puritan era commentaries in McKim’s Historical Handbook of Major Biblical Interpreters  Buy  that is in English and online;

– Every Reformed, puritan or otherwise good commentary we could find in the 1500’s & 1600’s on PRDL and EEBO that is in English;

– Some works in English from early proto-reformers and other traditions as well (Lutheran, Anglican, Roman Catholic, Jewish, etc.). 

The commentaries are in the order of the books of the Bible, and then are ordered chronologically.  All the works on this page are included in our larger collection of Bible Commentaries from the whole of Church history.  If you find a commentary that we have missed, please send it over to us!

Spurgeon’s justly famous, helpful and often humorous comments and evaluations have been quoted under the titles where possible.  His scale is as follows: 

*** – ‘Heartily recommended’
** – ‘Good, but more ordinary’
* – ‘Least desirable’

Do note that Spurgeon’s recommendations were for whether a late-1800’s seminary student preparing to be a preacher should buy a certain commentary.  As some commentaries were very pricey and scarce in Spurgeon’s day, he sometimes gave a lower rating to certain commentaries than what they otherwise deserve, and his emphasis is on whether a given work will be helpful to a preacher or not.  By God’s grace, we have many more of these works available to us than what even Spurgeon and his readers had available to them in their own day.

We hope this collection will be a rich blessing to you.

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“Sanctify them through thy truth: thy Word is truth.”

Jn. 17:17

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The Best Commentary Ever Written on the Bible

Henry, Matthew – Commentary on the Whole Bible  d. 1714  Henry died after completing the commentary through Acts.  For a list of the contributors after that, see here.

Henry was a reformed puritan.  Here is a thoughtful and helpful Preface to the commentary by Archibald Alexander (1828, 8 pages), the first professor at old Princeton Seminary.  While abridged versions of anything are not usually recommended, this Concise Version of Matthew Henry’s Commentary is very suitable for children, family reading-aloud, and for those who just want to make it through the Bible a bit quicker.

Rev. Derek Thomas:  ‘George Whitefield read this commentary four times on his knees.  It cost, then, a quarter of an average working man’s annual salary!’ 

Spurgeon:  ***  ‘First among the mighty for general usefulness we are bound to mention the man whose name is a household word, Matthew Henry.  He is most pious and pithy, sound and sensible, suggestive and sober, terse and trustworthy.  You will find him to be glittering with metaphors, rich in analogies, overflowing with illustrations, superabundant in reflections.  He delights in apposition and alliteration; he is usually plain, quaint, and full of pith; he sees right through a text directly; apparently he is not critical, but he quietly gives the result of an accurate critical knowledge of the original fully up to the best critics of his time.  He is not versed in the manners and customs of the East, for the Holy Land was not so accessible as in our day; but he is deeply spiritual, heavenly, and profitable; finding good matter in every text, and from all deducing most practical and judicious lessons. 

His is a kind of commentary to be placed where I saw it, in the old meeting-house at Chester [where Henry preached]—chained in the vestry for anybody and everybody to read.  It is the poor man’s commentary, the old Christian’s companion, suitable to everybody, instructive to all… 

You are aware, perhaps, that the latter part of the New Testament [after the book of Acts] was completed by other hands, the good man having gone the way of all flesh… they have executed their work exceedingly well, have worked in much of the matter which Henry had collected, and have done their best to follow his methods, but their combined production is far inferior to Matthew Henry himself, and any reader will soon detect the difference. 

Every minister ought to read Matthew Henry entirely and carefully through once at least…  Begin at the beginning, and resolve that you will traverse the goodly land from Dan to Beersheba.  You will acquire a vast store of sermons if you read with your notebook close at hand; and as for thought, they will swarm around you like twittering swallows around an old gable towards the close of autumn.  If you publicly expound the chapter you have just been reading, your people will wonder at the novelty of your remarks and the depth of your thoughts, and then you may tell them what a treasure Henry is.’


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Whole Bible Commentaries – 1500’s

ed. George, Timothy – Reformation Commentary on Scripture, vols. Gen 1-11, Sam-Chron, Psalms 1-72, Eze-Dan; Lk, Jn 1-12, Acts, Gal-Eph, Phi-Col  Buy 

The purpose of this commentary series is to give a sampling of the protestant Reformation’s Bible interpretation by way of 1-2 paragraph samplings, with background info, from various Reformation era figures.  This is a great way to get familiar with some lesser known reformers and their writings.  Some are newly translated for these volumes.

Because the series is focused on the history of the Reformation, some non-reformed folk are included as well, such as Anabaptists, Arminians, etc.  The volumes are well done.  Hopefully the series will continue and eventually cover the entire Bible. 

Calvin, John – Commentary on the Bible  d. 1564

Most people know of Calvin as the one whose name is imbibed (against Calvin’s wishes) in the label ‘Calvinism’, otherwise known as the harmonious teaching of Holy Scripture.  What is not as well known is that his judiciousness as a commentator perhaps even excelled his skills as a theologian.  This remains, after 400 years, to be one of the best commentaries available.  Slowly read it and you will understand why. 

Spurgeon:  ***  ‘Of priceless value.’  ‘It would not be possible for me too earnestly to press upon you the importance of reading the expositions of that prince among men, John Calvin!…  if it be possible, procure them… use them diligently.  I have often felt inclined to cry out with Father Simon, a Roman Catholic, ‘Calvin possessed a sublime genius,’ and with Scaliger, ‘Oh! How well has Calvin reached the meaning of the prophets—no one better.’  You will find forty-two [22 in some modern editions] or more goodly volumes worth their weight in gold.  Of all commentators I believe John Calvin to be the most candid. 

In his expositions he is not always what moderns would call Calvinistic; that is to say, where Scripture maintains the doctrine of predestination and grace he flinches in no degree, but inasmuch as some Scriptures bear the impress of human free action and responsibility, he does not shun to expound their meaning in all fairness and integrity. 

He was no trimmer and pruner of texts.  He gave their meaning as far as he knew it.  His honest intention was to translate the Hebrew and the Greek originals as accurately as he possibly could, and then to give the meaning which would naturally be conveyed by such Greek and Hebrew words: he labored, in fact, to declare, not his own mind upon the Spirit’s words, but the mind of the Spirit as couched in those words.  Dr. King very truly says of him,

‘No writer ever dealt more fairly and honestly by the Word of God.  He is scrupulously careful to let it speak for itself, and to guard against every tendency of his own mind to put upon it a questionable meaning for the sake of establishing some doctrine which he feels to be important, or some theory which he is anxious to uphold.  This is one of his prime excellences.  He will not maintain any doctrine, however orthodox and essential, by a text of Scripture which to him appears of doubtful application, or of inadequate force.  For instance, firmly as he believed the doctrine of the Trinity, he refuses to derive an argument in its favor from the plural form of the name of God in the first chapter of Genesis.  It were easy to multiply examples of this kind, which, whether we agree in his conclusion or not, cannot fail to produce the conviction that he is at least an honest commentator, and will not make an passage of Scripture speak more or less than, according to his view, its divine Author intended it to speak…. 

If you needed any confirmatory evidence as to the value of his writings, I might summon a cloud of witnesses, but it will suffice to quote one or two.  Here is the opinion of one who is looked upon as his great enemy, namely, Arminius:

‘Next to the perusal of the Scriptures, which I earnestly inculcate, I exhort my pupils to peruse Calvin’s commentaries, which I extol in loftier terms than [Werner] Helmich [(1551-1608) a Dutch Protestant divine] himself; for I affirm that he excels beyond comparison in the interpretation of Scripture, and that his commentaries ought to be more highly valued than all that is handed down to us by the Library of the Fathers; so that I acknowledge him to have possessed above most others, or rather above all other men, what may be called an eminent gift of prophecy.’’

Various – The Geneva Bible Annotations  1599  These are comments by way of margin notes on the Bible by the following editors: John Calvin, John Knox, Theodore Beza, Miles Coverdale, William Whittingham, Anthony Gilby, Christoper Goodman, Thomas Sampson, William Cole, William Keithe, Laurance Tomson, Franciscus Junius, John Bale, Heinrich Bullinger and some others. 

See the link for an introduction to these historically influential Bible notes from your favorite reformers at Geneva.  The notes, intending to be only marginal notes, unfortunately are often concise and sparse.

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Whole Bible Commentaries – 1600’s

Various – The King James Version’s Translator’s Notes  1611

These are the alternate translations for the Hebrew and Greek verses from the King James translators themselves.  

These are reliable alternate translations from a reliable textual base, and these alternate translational readings lack the loose translation philosophy of many translational philosophies today found in many popular Bibles.

Mayer, John – Exposition of the Whole Bible  Ref  1627-53

Mayer produced one of the major reformed, whole Bible commentaries during the 1600’s.  The first volume was published in 1627 and the last in 1653.

**  ‘A rare and valuable author… The six volumes, folio, are a most judicious and able digest of former commentators, enriched with the author’s own notes, forming altogether one of the fullest and best of learned English commentaries; not meant for popular use, but invaluable to the student.  He is a link between the modern school, at the head of which I put Poole and Henry, and the older school who mostly wrote in Latin, and were tinctured with the conceits of those schoolmen who gathered like flies around the corpse of Aristotle.  He appears to have written before Diodati and Trapp, but lacked opportunity to publish.  I fear he will be forgotten, as there is but little prospect of the republication of so diffuse, and perhaps heavy, an author.  He is a very Alp of learning, but cold and lacking in spirituality, hence his lack of popularity.’ – Spurgeon

The Dutch Annotations upon the Whole Bible, Gen-Song, Isa-Matt 9, Matt-Rev, 3  Buy: Reprint  Fascimile  1637/57   transl. Theodore Haak

‘If Spurgeon had rated the Dutch Annotations, translated by Theodore Haak, for example, according to its just deserts, perhaps it would have been reprinted several times during the twentieth century!’ – Rev. Joel Beeke

**  ‘Haak’s Annotations come to us as the offspring of the famous Synod of Dort… but if, with my hat off, bowing profoundly to those august conclaves of master minds, I may venture to say so, I would observe that they furnish another instance that committees seldom equal the labors of individuals.  The notes are too short and fragmentary to be of any great value.  The volumes are a heavy investment.’  ‘Similar to the Westminster Assembly’s Annotations.’ – Spurgeon

Grotius, Hugo – Annotations on the Old and New Testaments  1641-50

Grotius was a leading Biblical scholar of his day as well as an Arminian and Erastian.  His commentary was widely influential for generations afterwards, though it greatly suffers for his aberrant doctrinal views and often idiosyncratic and unlikely textual interpretations.

Diodati, John – Pious Annotations, upon the Holy Bible  1643

**  “Bickersteth says: ‘The spiritual and evangelical remarks are of much value.’  Diodati’s notes are short and worth consulting.” – Spurgeon

English Annotations on the Whole Bible, vol. 1 (Gen-Song), 2 (Isa-Rev)  1st ed. 1645

These were also popularly known as the Westminster Annotations, as over half of the commentators were Westminster divines.  The first edition has rather brief notes.  The fuller third (and last) edition is considered the best edition.  It can be purchased on the Puritan Hard-Drive, sold by Still Waters Revival.  Here is an introduction to the commentary with the list of contributors.

**  ‘…the Westminster Annotations [come to us] as the production of a still more venerable assembly; but if, with my hat off, bowing profoundly to those august conclaves of master minds, I may venture to say so, I would observe that they furnish another instance that committees seldom equal the labors of individuals.  The notes are too short and fragmentary to be of any great value.  The volumes are a heavy investment.’  ‘Contain valuable remarks, but are somewhat out of date.  The work is probably less esteemed than it should be.’ – Spurgeon

Thaddaeus, Johannes – The Reconciler of the Bible Enlarged: Wherein Above Three Thousand Seeming Contradictions Throughout the Old and New Testament, are Fully and Plainly Reconciled  d. 1652

“Really a commentary on the whole Bible.  A very useful work.” – Dr. Leslie McFall

Hall, Joseph – A Plain and Familiar Explication: by way of Paraphrase, of all the hard texts of the whole divine scriptures of the Old and New Testaments, vols. 1 (Gen-Dan), 2 (Hos-Rev)  d. 1656

By hard texts, Hall means the hard parts in about every other verse of the Bible, as that is how much he comments on.

**  ‘Not so pithy as the Contemplations; nor, indeed, could it be expected to be so.  It is not necessary to the Student, but might be useful.’

Trapp, John – A Complete Commentary on the Bible  d. 1669

Trapp was a reformed Anglican, though presbyterian in his leanings.

***  ‘Would it be possible to eulogize too much the incomparably sententious and suggestive folios of John Trapp?  Since Mr. Dickinson has rendered them accessible, I trust most of you have bought them.  Trapp will be most valuable to men of discernment, to thoughtful men, to men who only want a start in a line of thought, and are then able to run alone. 

Trapp excels in witty stories on the one hand, and learned allusions on the other.  You will not thoroughly enjoy him unless you can turn to the original, and yet a mere dunce at classics will prize him.  His writings remind me of himself: he was a pastor, hence his holy practical remarks; he was the head of a public school, and everywhere we see his profound scholarship; he was for some time amid the guns and drums of a parliamentary garrison, and he gossips and tells queer anecdotes like a man used to soldier-life; yet withal, he comments as if he had been nothing else but a commentator all his days. 

Some of his remarks are far-fetched, and like the far-fetched rarities of Solomon’s Tarshish, there is much gold and silver, but there are also apes and peacocks.  His criticisms would some of them be the cause of amusement in these days of greater scholarship; but for all that, he who shall excel Trapp had need rise very early in the morning. 

Trapp is my especial companion and treasure; I can read him when I am too weary for anything else.  Trapp is salt, pepper, mustard, vineagar, and all the other condiments.  Put him on the table when you study, and when you have your dish ready, use him by way of spicing the whole thing.  Yes, gentlemen, read Trapp certainly, and if you catch the infection of his consecrated humor, so much the better for your hearers.’ – Spurgeon

Poole, Matthew – English Annotations on the Holy Bible  d. 1679   Poole died after finishing Isa. 58.  For a list of the contributors after that, see here.

Poole (1624–1679) was a reformed puritan.

Spurgeon:  ***  ‘Matthew Poole also wrote Annotations upon the Word of God, in English, which are mentioned by Matthew Henry as having passed through many impressions in his day, and he not only highly praises them, but declares that he has in his own work all along been brief upon that which Mr. Poole has more largely discussed, and has industriously declined what is to be found there.  The three volumes, tolerably cheap, and easily to be got at, are necessaries for your libraries. 

On the whole, if I must have only one commentary, and had read Matthew Henry as I have, I do not know but what, I should choose Poole.  He is a very prudent and judicious commentator; and one of the few who could honestly say:

‘We have not willingly balked any obvious difficulty, and have designed a just satisfaction to all our readers; and if any knot remains yet untied, we have told our readers what hath been most probably said for their satisfaction in the untying of it.’

Poole is not so pithy and witty by far as Matthew Henry, but he is perhaps more accurate, less a commentator, and more an expositor.  You meet with no ostentation of learning in Matthew Poole, and that for the simple reason that he was so profoundly learned as to be able to be able to give results without display of his intellectual crockery. 

A pedant who is for ever quoting Ambrose and Jerome, Piscator and Oecolampadius, in order to show what a copious reader he has been, is usually a dealer in small wares, and quotes only what others have quoted before him, but he who can give you the result and outcome of very extensive reading without sounding a trumpet before him is the really learned man… Strange to say, like the other great Matthew [Henry], he [Poole] did not live to complete his work beyond Isaiah 53; other hands united to finish the design.’ 

Owen, John – Biblical Theology: the History of Theology from Adam to Christ  Buy  †1683  856 pp.

While this work is not a commentary, it covers most of the whole of revelation and the interpretation of much of it.

This work is not in Owen’s 16 volume Works, nor in his Hebrews commentary, but must be purchased as a separate volume, it being only recently translated out of the Latin.

Clarke, Samuel – Annotations upon the Old and New Testaments  1690

Clarke (d. 1701) was a late puritan.  His annotations are very hard to find, though sometimes the New Testament portion can be bought as a print-on-demand.  The main drawback is the brevity (and often sparsity) of his comments.  See George Whitefield’s recommendatory preface to Clarke’s Annotations in Whitefield’s Works, vol. 4, p. 277

**  ‘Notes very brief, but judicious.  Author one of the ejected ministers, an exceedingly learned man.  This work was highly commended by Owen, Baxter, Howe and others, but is now superseded.’ – Spurgeon

Ness, Christopher – A Complete History and Mystery of the Old and New Testament logically discussed and theologically improved: in four volumes … the like undertaking (in such a manner and method) being never by any author attempted before: yet this is now approved and commended by grave divines  Ref  1690-96

Ness (1621-1705) was the reformed puritan that wrote An Antidote Against Arminianism, which is known to some reformed folk.  

***  ‘Far more useful [than the commentary of Arthur Jackson (1653)] is Ness’ History and Mystery of the Old and New Testament, a grand repository of quaint remarks upon the historical books of Scripture.  You will find it contained in four thin folio volumes, and you will have a treasure if you procure it.’  ‘Quaint, pithy, suggestive.  Full of remarks such as are to be found in Thomas Fuller and Bishop Hall.’ – Spurgeon

Mather, Cotton – Biblia Americana: A Synoptic Commentary on the Old and New Testaments, 10 vols  Buy: Gen  Josh-2 Chr  Ezr-Ps  Prov-Jer  1693-1728

This was the first whole Bible commentary to come from American soil.  Cotton was a reformed puritan.  The series is projected to be 10 volumes.  The 47 page General Introduction to the series is online.  These volumes are very pricey as they are done by an academic publisher.  


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On the Whole Old Testament or the Majority thereof

1600’s

Jackson, Arthur – A Help for the Understanding of the Holy Scriptures, vols. 1 (Torah), 2, 3 (Job-Song), 4  1643

Jackson (1593-1666) was a reformed puritan.  

**  ‘In 1653, Arthur Jackson, preacher of God’s Word in Wood Street, London, issued four volumes upon the Old Testament, which appear to have been the result of his pulpit expositions to his people.  Valuable his works would be if there were no better, but they are not comparable to others already and afterwards mentioned.  You can do without him, but he is a reputable author.’  ‘Rather tame, but will well repay quiet reading.  His works are now somewhat rare.’ – Spurgeon

Richardson, John – Choice Observations and Explanations upon the Old Testament, containing in them many remarkable matters, additional to the large Annotations made by some of the Assembly of Divines  d. 1654

Richardson was reformed and printed this only a few afters the second edition of the English Annotations (which were nicknamed the Westminster Annotations as 6 of the 11 commentators were Westminster divines), to which it was designed as a supplement.

**  ‘Of secondary importance, and very short; yet good.  Frequently bound up with Leigh [as Edward Leigh wrote a commentary on the whole N.T.].’ – Spurgeon

Hall, Joseph – Contemplations on the Historical Parts of the Old Testament  d. 1656

Hall was an influential reformed Anglican bishop.  These devotional and practical contemplations savor of deep spirituality and are very insightful.  One of a kind and one of the best.  Not every part of the O.T. is commented on.

***  ‘Need I commend Bishop Hall’s Contemplations to your affectionate attention?  What wit!  What sound sense!  What concealed learning!  His style is as pithy and witty as that of Thomas Fuller, and it has a sacred unction about it to which Fuller has no pretension.’  ‘The work can be readily procured; but if its price were raised in proportion to its real value, it would become one of the most costly books extant.’ – Spurgeon

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Jewish Commentaries on the Old Testament

Rashi – Commentary on the Whole Old Testament  d.  1106  After you click on a book of the Bible, note that you have to click on ‘Show’ Rashi’s commentary for it to appear, otherwise it will only show the selected passage of scripture.

‘Rashi (Rabbi Shlomo ben Yitzchak) is the most influential Jewish exegete of all time…  Rashi says ‘I, however, am only concerned with the plain sense of Scripture and with such Aggadot [exegetical notes] that explain the words of Scripture in a manner that fits in with them” – Wiki

Elias Levita – The Massoreth Ha-Massoreth of Elias Levita: being an Exposition of the Massoretic Notes on the Hebrew Bible, or the Ancient Critical apparatus of the Old Testament in Hebrew  d. 1549  Translated, and with an 84 page introduction, by Ginsburg, 1867. 

Masoreth means ‘to bind’ or ‘fix’, that is, it was the Jewish commentary on the scribal reproduction of the Hebrew scriptures during the first millennium of the Christian era, meant to ‘fix’ and preserve the Hebrew text indefinitely.  For a helpful summary of the Masorah and its significance, see the reliable McClintock and Strong’s Cyclopedia.

Levita’s title connotates something to the effect of ‘a binding commentary on the Masorah’, that is, to shore up and confirm the validity and usefulness of the Masorah.  Ginsburg was a leading Hebraicist of the 1800’s.  In the very valuable introduction he says:

‘ The work now submitted to the public in the original Hebrew, with an English translation, is an explanation of the origin and import of the Massorah.  Those who are acquainted with the fact that our Hebrew Bibles abound with marginal and textual glosses… and who know that there is no guide in our [English] language to these enigmatical notes, will welcome this Treatise, written first, and almost the only, Massoretic exposition.’  

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The Whole Pentateuch

1600’s

Babington, Gervase – Certain Plain, Brief and Comfortable Notes upon the 5 Books of Moses: Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy  also in Works, d. 1610

*  “Our copy is in the old Black Letter.  It contains little to repay the student for toiling through the old-fashioned expressions.” – Spurgeon

Ainsworth, Henry – Annotations upon the Five Books of Moses, the Book of the Psalms, and Song of Songs, or, Canticles, vols. 1, 2  d. 1622,  vol. 1 goes up through Num. 11

***  ‘Thoroughly learned.  Though old, not out of date.’ – Spurgeon

‘Ainsworth was a celebrated scholar and an excellent divine.  His uncommon skill in Hebrew learning, and his excellent commentaries on the Scripture are held in high reputation to this day.’ – Benjamin Brook, ‘Lives of the Puritans’

Jackson, Arthur – A Help for the Understanding of the Holy Scripture, containing certain short notes of Exposition upon the Five Books of Moses  1643

Jackson (1593-1666) was a reformed puritan.  

Wright, Abraham – A Practical Commentary or Exposition upon the Pentateuch  1662

** ‘An extremely rare old book.  The style and matter are after the manner of Christopher Ness [see here].  Wright [1611-1690] does not comment upon every verse, but after indicating the run of the chapter gives little sermons upon the more salient points.  He is very quaint and pithy.’ – Spurgeon

‘…which appear to have been the result of his pulpit expositions to his people.  Valuable his works would be if there were no better, but they are not comparable to others already and afterwards mentioned.  You can do without him, but he is a reputable author.’ – Spurgeon

Kidder, Richard – Commentary on the First Five Books of Moses, vol. 1 (Gen.-Ex.), 2 (Lev.-Dt.)  1694

Kidder (1634-1703) was an Anglican.

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The Judicial Laws

Weemes, John – An Explication of the Judicial Laws of Moses  1632  260 pp.

Weemes (1579-1636) was an early Scottish covenanter and prolific Hebrew scholar.

“He was well acquainted with the original Scriptures, with Jewish manners and antiquities, and with the best mode of interpreting the Bible.  The style is quaint, but always intelligible.” – Orme

*  “This contains many useful and curious things, together with fancies and rabbinical trifles.  Weemse may generally be bought very cheap, and we should think his work is very little read or cared for.” – Spurgeon

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The Ceremonial Laws

Guild, William – Moses Unveiled: or Those Figures which Served unto the Pattern and shadow of heavenly things, pointing out the Messiah Christ Jesus, briefly explained; Whereunto is added the harmony of all the prophets, breathing with one mouth the mystery of his coming, and of that redemption which by his death He was to accomplish  1620  62 pp.

Guild was a Scottish covenanter.

Weemes, John – An Explanation of the Ceremonial Laws of Moses  1632  300 pp.

Weemes (1579-1636) was an early Scottish covenanter and prolific Hebrew scholar.

“He was well acquainted with the original Scriptures, with Jewish manners and antiquities, and with the best mode of interpreting the Bible.  The style is quaint, but always intelligible.” – Orme

*  “This contains many useful and curious things, together with fancies and rabbinical trifles.  Weemse may generally be bought very cheap, and we should think his work is very little read or cared for.” – Spurgeon

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Genesis

1600’s

Gibbens, Nicholas – Questions and Disputations concerning the Holy Scripture wherein are contained, brief, faithful and sound expositions of the most difficult and hardest places…  ToC  1602

*‘In his own fashion this antique writer tries to answer curious questions which are suggested by Genesis.  His day is over.’

Willet, Andrew – A Sixfold Commentary upon the Two first Books of Moses, being Genesis and Exodus  d. 1621

Willet (1562–1621)

**‘This work is called by its author a Hexapla, because he treats his subject under six heads, giving ‘a sixfold use of every chapter, showing:

1. The method of argument;
2. The diverse readings;
3. The explanation of difficult questions and doubtful places;  
4. The places of doctrine;  
5. Places of confutation;  
6. Moral observations.’

Willet is tedious reading; his method hampers him.  In all his Commentaries he lumbers along in his six-wheeled wagon.’ – Spurgeon

Whatley, William – Prototypes, or, The Primary Precedent Presidents out of the book of Genesis showing, the good and bad things they did and had practically applied to our Information and Reformation  1640

** ‘A queer old book.  The oddity of the title is born out by the singularity of the matter.  It does not expound each verse; but certain incidents are dwelt upon.’

Richardson, John – Annotations on Genesis  d. 1654  67 pp.

Richardson was reformed and printed this only a few years after the second edition of the English Annotations (which were nicknamed the Westminster Annotations as 6 of the 11 commentators were Westminster divines), to which it was designed as a supplement.

On Richardson’s brief commentary on the O.T.:  **  ‘Of secondary importance, and very short; yet good.  Frequently bound up with Leigh [as Edward Leigh wrote a commentary on the whole N.T.].’ – Spurgeon

Hughes, George – An Analytical Exposition of the Whole First Book of Moses, called Genesis, and of 23 chapters of his second book, called Exodus  ToC  1672

Hughes (1603-1667) was a puritan.

*** – ‘The deductions which Hughes draws from the text are of the nature of homiletical hints, and for this reason he will be a treasure to the minister.  He belongs to the noble army of Puritans.’ – Spurgeon

Poole, Matthew – Critical Synopsis of the Bible: Genesis, 3 vols.  Buy  †1679

This is different and much larger than Poole’s Annotations on Scripture.  Here Poole gives something of a history of interpretation (from Jewish writers until Christian interpreters of Poole’s own day) on every verse of the Bible.

‘…you will find in Poole’s Synopsis a marvelous collection of all the wisdom and folly of the critics.  It is a large cyclopedia worthy of the days when theologians could be cyclopean, and had not shrunk from folios to octavos.  Query—a query for which I will not demand an answer—has one of you beaten the dust from the venerable copy of Poole which loads our library shelves?  Yet as Poole spent no less than ten years in compiling it, it should be worthy of your frequent notice—ten years, let me add, spent in Amsterdam in exile for the truth’s sake from his native land.  His work is based on an earlier compilation entitled Critic Sacri, containing the concentrated light of a constellation of learned men who have never been excelled in any age or country.’ – Spurgeon

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Sections of Genesis

Lightfoot, John – A Few and New Observations upon the Book of Genesis  8 pp. in two volume works, vol. 1, p. 691 ff.

Le Clerk, Jean – 12 Dissertations out of Monsieur Le Clerk’s Genesis  1696  360 pp.

The dissertations are: (1) Hebrew tongue, (2) Manner of interpreting the Bible, (3) Author of the Penteteuch, (4) Temptation of Eve by the Serpent, (5) Flood, (6) Confusion of languages, (7) Original of Circumcision, (8) Divine appearances in the O.T., (9) Subversion of Sodom, (10) Pillar of Salt, (11) Coming of Shiloh, (12) Several obscure texts explained.

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Chapters in Genesis

Oecolampadius, Johannes – An Exposition of Genesis  Buy  These are his lectures on Gen. 1-3

Oecolampadius (1482–1531) was a German/Swiss reformer, a co-worker with Erasmus and Zwingli, and as was influential upon Bullinger, Calvin and others.

White, John – A Commentary upon the Three First Chapters of the First Book of Moses called Genesis  ToC  1656  †1648

White (1575–1648) was a Westminster divine and was influential for the  Massachusetts Bay Company settling in America, though he never made the trip across to the New World.

** “A puritan divine, called ‘The Patriarch of Dorchester’”  “A folio upon three chapters!  There were giants in those days.  Manton says, ‘To speak of the worth of the author is needless, his praise being already in all of the churches,’ and he adds that he had been greatly refreshed by the perusal of this book.” – Spurgeon

Needler, Benjamin – Expository Notes, with Practical Observations, towards the opening of the Five First Chapters of the First Book of Moses  1655

* ‘Needler was one of the eminent divines who took part in the famous [puritan] Morning Exercises [at Cripplegate].  The little work is a curiosity, but nothing more.’ – Spurgeon

Bunyan, John – An Exposition of the First Ten Chapters of Genesis  in Works, vol. 2

*  “Allegorical and spiritual.  Bunyan’s characteristics are very prominently manifest.” – Spurgeon

Henry, Philip – An Exposition, with Practical Observations, upon the First Eleven Chapters of the Book of Genesis  d. 1696

**‘Interesting as the exposition of Matthew Henry’s father, taken down from his lips at family prayer by Matthew his son.  This probably suggested the famous Commentary [of Matthew Henry].’ – Spurgeon

Luther, Martin – Lectures on Genesis, vols. 1 (ch. 1-5), 2 (6-14), 3 (15-20), 4 (21-25), 5 (26-30), 6 (31-37), 7 (38-44), 8 (45-50)  Buy  ed. Henry Cole

** ‘Cole made a choice selection.  Luther left four volumes upon Genesis in Latin.  How these Reformers worked!’ – Surgeon

Clapham, Henoch – Commentary on the First Fourteen Chapters of Genesis  †1614 

Clapham (fl.1585-1614) was a puritan.

* “Clapham was a voluminous author of very remarkable attainments.  He wrote also on the first fourteen chapters of Genesis.  This work [on the Song of Solomon] is rare as angel’s visits.” – Spurgeon

Ross, Alexander – An Exposition on the Fourteen First Chapters of Genesis, by way of question and answer, Collected out of ancient and recent writers: both briefly and subtilly propounded and expounded  1626

* – “A very scarce catechism by that Scotch divine who is mentioned in Hudibras [p. 56] in the lines:

‘There was an ancient sound philosopher
That had read Alexander Ross over.’”

Calvin, John

Sermons on Genesis, chs. 1-11, 12-22  Buy

These sermons are different from his commentary on Genesis.

Sermons on Melchizedek and Abraham  Buy  on Gen. 14

Shute, Josias – Sarah and Hagar, or Genesis the 16th chapter opened in Twenty Sermons  1649  248 pp.

Shute was a reformed Anglican.

** – ‘Above three and thirty years rector of St. Mary, Woolnoth.’  ‘In shape, the editor tells us, ‘this book is somewhat slender, like the encouragements of learning.’  He informs us that the author was ‘one of the five famous brother-preachers, somewhat like the five fingers on the right hand of fellowship;’ and that Chrysostom did so much lie in his bosom that he became like him in his flowing style and golden eloquence.  He writes like a learned man, and treats the Scriptures as if ‘each book were a course, each chapter a Benjamin’s mess, and every verse a morsel of the food of angels.”

Beza, Theodore – A Tragedy of Abraham’s Sacrifice  (Gen. 22)  1575  

Cowper, William – Jacob’s Wrestling with God  1608  148 pp.  on Gen. 28

Cowper was a Scottish bishop.

Rollinson, Francis – Twelve Prophetical Legacies; or, Twelve Sermons upon Jacob’s Last Will, recorded in the 45th chapter of Genesis  1612

* ‘Old-fashioned learning, and singular remarks; its rarity is no great calamity.’

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Exodus

1600’s

Babington, Gervase – Certain Plain, Brief and Comfortable Notes upon Exodus & Leviticus  also in Works, d. 1610

Willet, Andrew – A Sixfold Commentary upon the two first Books of Moses, being Genesis and Exodus  d. 1621

Willet (1562–1621)

** – ‘This work is called by its author [1562-1621] a Hexapla, because he treats his subject under six heads, giving ‘a sixfold use of every chapter, showing:

1. The method of argument;
2. The diverse readings;
3. The explanation of difficult questions and doubtful places;  
4. The places of doctrine;  
5. Places of confutation;  
6. Moral observations.’

Willet is tedious reading; his method hampers him.  In all his Commentaries he lumbers along in his six-wheeled wagon.’  ‘Full, exhaustive, and exhausting.’ – Spurgeon

Lightfoot, John – An Handful of Gleanings out of the Book of Exodus  26 pp. in his two volume works, vol. 1, p. 699-725

Poole, Matthew – Critical Synopsis of the Bible: Exodus, 2 vols.  Buy  †1679

This is different and much larger than Poole’s Annotations on Scripture.  Here Poole gives something of a history of interpretation (from Jewish writers until Christian interpreters of Poole’s own day) on every verse of the Bible.

‘…you will find in Poole’s Synopsis a marvelous collection of all the wisdom and folly of the critics.  It is a large cyclopedia worthy of the days when theologians could be cyclopean, and had not shrunk from folios to octavos.  Query—a query for which I will not demand an answer—has one of you beaten the dust from the venerable copy of Poole which loads our library shelves?  Yet as Poole spent no less than ten years in compiling it, it should be worthy of your frequent notice—ten years, let me add, spent in Amsterdam in exile for the truth’s sake from his native land.  His work is based on an earlier compilation entitled Critic Sacri, containing the concentrated light of a constellation of learned men who have never been excelled in any age or country.’ – Spurgeon

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Parts of Exodus

Hughes, George – An Analytical Exposition of the Whole First Book of Moses, called Genesis, and of 23 chapters of his second book, called Exodus…  ToC  1672

Hughes (1603-1667) was a puritan.

** – ‘The deductions which Hughes draws from the text are of the nature of homiletical hints, and for this reason he will be a treasure to the minister.  He belongs to the noble army of Puritans.’ – Spurgeon

Jackson, Thomas – Paraphrase on the Eleven First Chapters of Exodus, with Annotations, etc. in Works, vol. 9, p. 384 ff. d. 1640  Thomas Jackson (to be distinguished from Arthur Jackson) was an Arminian Anglican.

– ‘George Herbert set great store by Dr. Jackson’s writings, for he said, ‘I bless God for the confirmation Dr. Jackson has given me in the Christian religion, against the Atheist, Jew and Socinian, and in the Protestant against Rome.’  It would hardly repay a student to purchase three folio volumes to obtain the small portion allotted to his Paraphrase.  So far as commenting is concerned it is not important.’ – Spurgeon

Wycliff, John – ‘The Song of Moses and the Children of Israel’  in Select English Works of John Wycliff, vol. 3, part 1, p. 18-24  on Gen. 15

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Expositions of the 10 Commandments

The following page has works on it from throughout Church history.  See the works from the 1500’s & 1600’s sections under the lager sections of: Shorter Works, Medium Length Works & Longer Works.

Expositions of the 10 Commandments

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Leviticus

1600’s

Babington, Gervase – Certain Plain, Brief and Comfortable Notes upon Exodus & Leviticus  also in Works, d. 1610

Willet, Andrew – A Six-fold Commentary upon the Third Book of Moses, called Leviticus  d. 1621

Willet (1562–1621)

**  “Plodding along with his six-fold load, Willet gives us a comparison of ten versions, ‘handles well nigh two thousand theological questions,’ and quotes ‘above forty authors, old and new.’  He sums up all preceding commentaries, both Protestant and Romish.” – Spurgeon

Poole, Matthew – Critical Synopsis of the Bible: Leviticus  Buy  †1679

This is different and much larger than Poole’s Annotations on Scripture.  Here Poole gives something of a history of interpretation (from Jewish writers until Christian interpreters of Poole’s own day) on every verse of the Bible.

‘…you will find in Poole’s Synopsis a marvelous collection of all the wisdom and folly of the critics.  It is a large cyclopedia worthy of the days when theologians could be cyclopean, and had not shrunk from folios to octavos.  Query—a query for which I will not demand an answer—has one of you beaten the dust from the venerable copy of Poole which loads our library shelves?  Yet as Poole spent no less than ten years in compiling it, it should be worthy of your frequent notice—ten years, let me add, spent in Amsterdam in exile for the truth’s sake from his native land.  His work is based on an earlier compilation entitled Critic Sacri, containing the concentrated light of a constellation of learned men who have never been excelled in any age or country.’ – Spurgeon

Patrick, Simon – A Commentary upon the 3rd Book of Moses, called Leviticus  1698

Patrick (1626-1707) was an Arminian, Latitudinarian Anglican.

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On Figures and Types

Guild, William – Moses Unveiled: or Those Figures which Served unto the Pattern and shadow of heavenly things, pointing out the Messiah Christ Jesus, briefly explained; Whereunto is added the harmony of all the prophets, breathing with one mouth the mystery of his coming, and of that redemption which by his death He was to accomplish  1620  62 pp.

Guild was a Scottish covenanter.

Mather, Samuel – The Figures or Types of the Old Testament, by which Christ and the Heavenly things of the gospel were preached and shadowed to the people of God of old, explained and improved in sundry sermons  1705  †1671  570 pp.

**‘Though this is a work upon all the types, it contains so much instructive matter upon the Levitical sacrifices that we cannot forbear mentioning it here.  It is one of the old standard books of our fathers.’ – Spurgeon

Keach, Benjamin – Tropologia, a Key to Open Scripture Metaphors… together with Types of the Old Testament  d. 1704  Keach was a Baptist at the same church as Spurgeon would later minister at.

**  “This is a vast cyclopedia of types and metaphors of all sorts, and was once very popular.  It is a capital book, though too often the figures not only run on all-fours but on as many legs as a centipede.  It is not strictly upon Leviticus, but we felt bound to insert it in this place.” – Spurgeon

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Numbers

Attersoll, William – A Commentary upon the Fourth Book of Moses, called Numbers  Ref  1618

** – ‘A stupendous work, well fitted to make a headstone for the author’s grave.  It is so huge that it might have been the work of a lifetime, and yet the same writer has also given us Philemon.  Think of 1271 folio pages on Numbers!’ – Spurgeon

Poole, Matthew – Critical Synopsis of the Bible: Numbers  Buy  †1679

This is different and much larger than Poole’s Annotations on Scripture.  Here Poole gives something of a history of interpretation (from Jewish writers until Christian interpreters of Poole’s own day) on every verse of the Bible.

‘…you will find in Poole’s Synopsis a marvelous collection of all the wisdom and folly of the critics.  It is a large cyclopedia worthy of the days when theologians could be cyclopean, and had not shrunk from folios to octavos.  Query—a query for which I will not demand an answer—has one of you beaten the dust from the venerable copy of Poole which loads our library shelves?  Yet as Poole spent no less than ten years in compiling it, it should be worthy of your frequent notice—ten years, let me add, spent in Amsterdam in exile for the truth’s sake from his native land.  His work is based on an earlier compilation entitled Critic Sacri, containing the concentrated light of a constellation of learned men who have never been excelled in any age or country.’ – Spurgeon

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Deuteronomy

Luther, Martin – Lectures on Deuteronomy  Buy  in Works, vol. 9

Calvin, John – Sermons on Deuteronomy  d. 1564

***‘This is not the same as that which is contained in the “Calvin Translation Society’s Commentaries.”  Everything that Calvin wrote by way of exposition is priceless; even those who differ from him in theology admit this.’ – Spurgeon

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Chapters in Deuteronomy

Wycliff, John – ‘The Song of Moses’  in Select English Works of John Wycliff, vol. 3, part 1, p. 32-48 on Dt. 32


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Joshua

None

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Judges

1500’s

Vermigli, Peter Martyr – A Most Fruitful and Learned Commentary on Judges  ToC  1560

* ‘This would seem to be a profound work.  [Richard] Rogers says of Peter Martyr: ‘Few private men can understand his works, and few ministers who understand them can obtain them; nor if they can will they find in them much that will benefit their simple hearers.’  This has not been our experience with Peter Martyr’s works; on the contrary, we have read them with interest.’

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1600’s

Rogers, Richard – A Commentary upon the Whole Book of Judges, preached first and delivered in sundry lectures  EEBO  1615

***‘This for the puritan period is THE work upon Judges.  It is thoroughly plain and eminently practical.’ – Spurgeon

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Ruth

1500’s

Lavater, Ludwig – The Book of Ruth, Expounded in 28 Sermons  1586

Lavater was a Swiss reformed theologian.

* ‘Lavater was a reformer of high repute, son-in-law of Bullinger.  He wrote a curious work on spectres, and made a catalog of comets, thus showing himself to be both a philosopher and divine.  His book is seldom met with.’ – Spurgeon

Topsell, Edward – The Reward of Religion, delivered in sundry lectures upon the Book of Ruth  GB  1596  304 pp.

Topsell (1572-1625) was an Anglican.

*** “A very choice old work.  [William] Attersol in his rhyming preface says of it:

‘Go little Book, display thy golden title,
(And yet not little though thou little be);
Little for price and yet in price not little,
Thine was the pain, the gain is ours I see:
(Although our gain thou deem’st no pain to thee).
If then, O reader, little pain thou take,
Thou greatest gain with smallest pain shall make.’” -Spurgeon

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1600’s

Bernard, Richard – Ruth’s Recompense, or a Commentary upon the Book of Ruth  1628  120 pp.

Bernard (1568-1641) was a puritan minister in England, and the predecessor of Richard Alleine. 

** – ‘Mr. Grosart is enthusiastic in his praise of this work, and says ‘that it abounds with apophthegms [concise sayings or maxims] and compressed thoughts.’  We defer to so high an authority, but we are not much fascinated by the book.’ – Spurgeon

Fuller, Thomas – A Commentary on Ruth; and, Notes upon Jonah  1650, † 1661

Fuller was a reformed Anglican.

** – ‘Not one of Fuller’s best; but still quaint and pithy, and lit up with flashes of his irrepressible wit.  The above works of Bernard and Fuller have been reprinted in Nichol’s Series of Commentaries, in one volume.’

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1 Samuel

Willet, Andrew – An Harmony upon the First Book of Samuel  1607

Willet (1562–1621)

*** – ‘The work continues the Hexapla to which we have referred…  It is unusually brief for the age of its composition, and full of variety.  Under every verse, and often clause of a verse, the learned author proposes a question, and proceeds to answer it.  These are such as the following: ‘What a daughter of Belial is?’  ‘Whether any may be said to sin with the will of God?’  ‘What doors of the house of Jehovah Samuel opened?’  ‘What is to be thought of Eli’s state before God?” – Spurgeon

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Chapters in 1 Samuel

Wycliff, John – ‘The Song of Hannah’  in Select English Works of John Wycliff, vol. 3, part 1, p. 13-18 on 1 Sam. 1

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David

Marbeck, John – The Whole History of King David  1579

*  “This is in English metre, and was written by the famous organist of the Royal Chapel in Windsor, in the reign of Henry VIII.  He narrowly escaped martyrdom.  His work entitled ‘Booke of Common Praier noted’, is the groundwork of the plain song used in our Cathedrals from the Reformation to the present day.  Marbeck’s History of David is very rare.  We cannot therefore set a price [at which it sells for].” – Spurgeon

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2 Samuel

1500’s

Calvin, John – Sermons on Second Samuel: Chapters 1-13  Buy

These sermons are different from his commentary.

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1600’s

Willet, Andrew – A Harmony upon the 2nd Book of Samuel  1614

Willet (1562–1621)

*** – ‘The work continues the Hexapla to which we have referred…  It is unusually brief for the age of its composition, and full of variety.  Under every verse, and often clause of a verse, the learned author proposes a question, and proceeds to answer it.  These are such as the following: ‘What a daughter of Belial is?’  ‘Whether any may be said to sin with the will of God?’  ‘What doors of the house of Jehovah Samuel opened?’  ‘What is to be thought of Eli’s state before God?” – Spurgeon

Guild, William – 2 Samuel  †1657

Guild (1586–1657) was a Scottish covenanter.

** – ‘The manuscript of this rare book was sent to Dr. John Owen by the widow of the author, with a letter of her own, informing him that her dying husband desired it to be so forwarded.  Dr. Owen says, that he found the treatise ‘written with perspicuity and clearness, handling a subject of great and delightful variety, with a choice mixture of spiritual, moral, and political observations, tempered by a good and sound judgment unto common capacities.’  We do not presume to criticize where Owen commends, but we should not have originated such a commendation.’ – Spurgeon

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1 Kings

None

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2 Kings

None

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2 Kings 5 – Naaman

Rogers, Daniel – Naaman the Syrian, his disease and cure discovering lively to the reader the spiritual leprosy of sin and self-love, together with the remedies, viz. self-denial and faith  ToC  1642

Rogers (1573-1652) was a reformed puritan.

*** – ‘A huge volume of 898 folio pages, almost large enough to have loaded one of Naaman’s mules.  It is a work which exhausts the subject and turns it to earnest evangelical uses.’ – Spurgeon

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1 Chronicles

None

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The Temple

Lee, Samuel – Orbis Miraculum, or, The Temple of Solomon portrayed by Scripture-light wherein all its famous buildings, the pompous worship of the Jews, with its attending rites and ceremonies, the several officers employed in that work, with their ample revenues, and the spiritual mysteries of the Gospel veiled under all, are treated at large  ToC  1659

Lee (1625–1691) was an English puritan academic and minister.

** ‘Of course, as will be inferred from its date, this work is of the antique order, but it is profoundly learned, and goes into architectural and ritualistic details, explaining them spiritually with much sweetness and suggestiveness.’ – Spurgeon

Bunyan, John – Solomon’s Temple Spiritualized, or Gospel Light Fetched out of the Temple at Jerusalem, to let us more easily into the Glory of New Testament Truths  †1688  140 pp.

** ‘A marvelous display of allegorizing genius: full of Gospel truth.  Bunyan hammers away at each type, but no one may call it tinkering.’ – Spurgeon

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2 Chronicles

None

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Ezra

None

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Chapters in Ezra

Leighton, Robert – A Fragment on Ezra 9  Buy  †1684  2 pp., in Works, vol. 4

Leighton was a very godly Scottish bishop.

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Nehemiah

Pilkington, James – A Godly Exposition of Nehemiah 1-5  d. 1576

Bishop Pilkington was one of the English reformers.

** – “Very old fashioned and singular, somewhat in the style of Latimer and perhaps a little coarser.  Pilington’s downright onslaughts upon the vices and follies of his times are fine instances of personal, faithful preaching; they are, however, so minutely descriptive of the manners which then prevailed that they are less useful now.  The style is cramped, and even grotesque, yet Pilkington is a grand old author.  He has only written upon five chapters.” – Spurgeon

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Esther

1500’s

Merlin, Pierre – A Most Plain and profitable Exposition of the book of Esther delivered in 26 Sermons  ToC  1599

Merlin (1533-1603) was reformed.

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1600’s

Cooper, Thomas – The Church’s Deliverance, containing Meditations and Short Notes upon the Book of Esther, in remembrance of the wonderful deliverance from the Gunpowder-Treason [Plot]  GB  1609

Cooper’s (fl.1609-1626) theological persuasion is unknown.

*“We have not been able to meet with this work.” – Spurgeon

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Job

1500’s

Calvin, John – Sermons on Job  d. 1564

***“Not the same as the commentary, but equally rich.” – Spurgeon

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1600’s

Caryl, Joseph

Exposition of Job  Buy

Ch. 1-3
Ch. 4-7
Ch. 8-10
Ch. 11-14

Ch. 15-17
Ch. 18-21
Ch. 22-26
Ch. 27-31

Ch. 32-34
Ch. 35-37
Ch. 38-42

Caryl was a Westminster divine.

*** – ‘Who can pretend to biblical learning who has not made himself familiar with the great writers who spent a life in explaining some one sacred book?  Caryl on Job will not exhaust the patience of a student who loves every letter of the Word.’  ‘Caryl must have inherited the patience of Job to have completed his stupendous task.  It would be a mistake to suppose that he is at all prolix or redundant; he is only full.  In the course of his expounding he has illustrated a very large portion of the whole Bible with great clearness and power.  He is deeply devotional and spiritual.  He gives us much, but none too much.  His work can scarcely be superseded or surpassed.’ – Spurgeon

An Exposition of Job: A one volume Abridgment  Buy

**“We do not believe in abridgments of a book which is good throughout.  think of twelve large volumes condensed into one small one!  An ox in a gallipot is nothing to it.” – Spurgeon

Hutcheson, George – An Exposition of the book of Job being the Sum of 316 Lectures  ToC  PoD  1657

*** – ‘Whenever the student sees a commentary by Hutcheson let him buy it, for we know of no author who is more thoroughly helpful to the minister of the Word.  He distills the text, and gives his readers the quintessence, ready for use.’ – Spurgeon

Leigh, Edward – Annotations on Five Poetical Books of the Old Testament: Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and Canticles  1657

**  ‘Good, brief notes.  Antique, but still prized.’ – Spurgeon

Durham, James – Job  HTML  Buy  †1658

*** – ‘This is a small book, and we have been unable to procure it.  [William] Orme [†1830] only mentions it upon the authority of Watt’s Bibliotheca.  It is certain to be good, for Durham is always admirable.’ – Surgeon

Jackson, Arthur – Annotations upon Job, the Psalms, the Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and the Song of Solomon  1658

“In 1653, Arthur Jackson, Preacher of God’s Word in Wood Street, London, issued four volumes upon the Old Testament, which appear to have been the result of his pulpit expositions to his people.  Valuable his works would be if there were no better, but they are not comparable to others already and afterwards mentioned.  You can do without him, but he is a reputable author.” – Spurgeon

Beza, Theodore – Job Expounded, partly in manner of a Commentary, partly in manner of a Paraphrase  1589

** – “Beza was the great friend and assistant of Calvin.  As a commentator he lacked the profound insight and comprehensive grasp of Calvin, but as a critical scholar he is said to have been his equal if not his superior.  This work on Job is rare.” – Spurgeon

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Commentary on Job in French

Senault, J.F. – Paraphrase sur Job  1648  In French

Senault (1599-1672) was a Roman Catholic in Paris.

*  “Senault was a famous preacher of the Oratory in Paris, who, from the character of his works, would seem to have been almost a Protestant.  His writings were highly esteemed in their day, and translated into English.” – Spurgeon

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Chapters in Job

Dickson, David – An Exposition of the 10th Chapter of Job  d. 1662  75 pages

Dickson was a leading Scottish covenanter.

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Psalms

1500’s

Luther, Martin 

Works  Buy

Vol. 10: First Lectures on the Psalms – 1-75
Vol. 11: First Lectures on the Psalms – 76-126
Vol. 12: Selected Psalms I
Vol. 13: Selected Psalms II
Vol. 14: Selected Psalms III

‘Commentary on Psalms 1-11’ & ‘Commentary on Psalms 12-22’ in Select Works of Luther, vol. 3  tr. Henry Cole, 1824

A Manual of the Book of Psalms; or the Subject-contents of all the Psalms  tr. Henry Cole

**“Luther needs no trumpeter.”  “Fragmentary, a mere table of contents, but truly Lutheran.” – Spurgeon

Capito, Wolfgang – An Epitome of the Psalms, or Brief Meditations upon the same, with diverse other most Christian Prayers  1539

Strigel, Victor – Part of the Harmony of King David’s Harp, vol. 1 (1-21), 2 (22-35), 3 (45-61), 4 (62-67), 5 (68-72)  1582  tr. Richard Robinson.  Strigel only comments on the first half of the Psalms.

Strigel (1524-1569) was a Lutheran who later moved to Heidelberg and accepted the Reformed view of the Eucharist.

** “This volume the expositor is not at all likely to see, and there is, therefore, the less need for us to speak of it.  Strigellius was the friend of Luther and Melancthon, and a man of sound sense and vast learning.” – Spurgeon

Beza, Theodore – The Psalms of David Truly Opened and Explained by Paraphrasis according to the right sense of every psalm, with large and ample arguments before every psalm declaring the true sense thereof  1590  This also contains, at the end, an exposition, in the same manner, of 14 Bible songs from the Old and New Testaments

Wilcox, Thomas – A Very Godly and Learned Exposition upon the Whole Book of Psalms  1591  

Wilcox (c.1549-1608) was a reformed puritan.

**  ‘Very old.  the notes are brief, but furnish many hints for sermons.’  ‘Short spiritual remarks, followed by many doctrinal inferences, calculated to suggest topics to preachers.’ – Spurgeon

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1600’s

Bellarmine, Robert – Commentary on the Book of Psalms  Buy  1611

Bellarmine (1542-1621) was a prominent Roman Catholic divine and apologist.  For background to this work in English, see this dissertation.

**  “Popish, but marvelously good for a Cardinal.  He is frequently as evangelical as a Reformer.  He follows the [Latin] Vulgate text in this comment.” – Spurgeon

Ainsworth, Henry – Annotations upon the Five Books of Moses, the Book of the Psalms, and Song of Songs, or, Canticles, vol. 2, p. 408 ff.  d. 1622 

“Ainsworth was a celebrated scholar and an excellent divine.  His uncommon skill in Hebrew learning, and his excellent commentaries on the Scriptures are held in high reputation to this day.” – Brook’s Live of the Puritans

***“Thoroughly learned.  Though old, not out of date.” – Spurgeon

Dickson, David 

A Brief Explication of the Psalms 1-50, 51-100, 101-150  Buy  1653-4

Dickson was a prominent Scottish covenanter.

*** – ‘A rich volume, dropping fatness.  Invaluable to the preacher.  Having read and re-read it, we can speak of its holy savor and suggestiveness.  We commend it with much fervor.’ – Spurgeon

The Psalms of David in metre, with the annotations of the Rev. David Dickson  d. 1662

These are brief summary notes and applications prefixed to each psalm in the psalter.  Mainly for devotional use.  Note that the available print-on-demand versions of this work by Nabu Press are a spectacularly unreadable farce.  Do not waste your money on them.

Abbott, George – Brief Notes upon the Whole Book of Psalms  1651

Abbott (1604-1649) was a reformed Anglican.

**“An experimental exposition by a Member of Parliament under the Commonwealth.  Though not of the first order, many of his remarks are good.  Abbot was nephew to the Archbishop of the same name.” – Spurgeon

Ewart, J. – Lectures on the Psalms, vol. 1, 2, 3  mid-1600’s, published 1826

*  “The author was a Presbyterian Minister in the time of the Pretender [Charles II, in England, mid-1600’s], and we suspect that he was a high and dry Moderate.  His comments were given at the public reading of the Scriptures, and although destitute of spirituality and Gospel clearness, they are not without a measure of originality.” – Spurgeon

Leigh, Edward – Annotations on Five Poetical Books of the Old Testament: Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and Canticles  1657

**  ‘Good, brief notes.  Antique, but still prized.’ – Spurgeon

Jackson, Arthur – Annotations upon Job, the Psalms, the Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and the Song of Solomon  1658

“In 1653, Arthur Jackson, Preacher of God’s Word in Wood Street, London, issued four volumes upon the Old Testament, which appear to have been the result of his pulpit expositions to his people.  Valuable his works would be if there were no better, but they are not comparable to others already and afterwards mentioned.  You can do without him, but he is a reputable author.” – Spurgeon

Hammond, Henry – A Paraphrase and Annotations upon the Psalms, as also upon the Ten First Chapters of the) Proverbs  1684  d. 1660

Hammond was an Arminian, Latitudinarian Anglican.  Nonetheless Matthew Henry was able to quote from him often.

** “Much esteemed, and deservedly so.  Hammond’s weighty tome is somewhat dry, and many of his remarks are rather those of a linguist than of a divine, but he touches on many matters which others omit, and is, upon the whole, an expositor of singular merit.”  – Spurgeon

Wright, Abraham – A Practical Commentary, wherein the Text of every Psalm is practically expounded according to the Doctrine of the Catholic Church, in a way not usually trod by commentators  1661

**“Wright selects the more remarkable verses, and comments on them in a deeply spiritual, quaint and suggestive manner.  His work is extremely rare.” – Spurgeon

Nicholson, William – David’s Harp Strung and Tuned; or, an Easy Analysis of the Whole Book of Psalms  ToC  1662

Nicholson (1591-1672) was a reformed Anglican.

“Wholly practical and explanatory.  In his explication the author steers between the two extremes of literal and spiritual interpretation.  Dr. Adam Clark has inserted Bishop Nicholson’s Analysis in his commentary on the Psalms, omitting his prayers.” – Horne

** – “This book fetches a high price when complete, and we cannot advise a poor man to lay out so much money upon it, good as it is.” – Spurgeon

Bythner, Victor – The Lyre of David, or, an Analysis of the Psalms, Critical and Practical  Latin  d. 1670

Bythner (1605-1670) was reformed.  

*** – “We agree with the statement found in the Preface of this work: ‘Nearly two centuries have passed away, since Bythner, uncertain of its reception, first committed his Lyra to public light; during which time, instead of sinking, it has advanced in estimation; being admitted by all the learned to be the very best work on the Psalms in Hebrew.  The number of Hebrew radical words is 1867; of these, 1184 occur in the Psalms; it follows then, that a thorough knowledge of the language, and that Bythner’s Lyra, in being the best work on the Psalms, must be the best work on Hebrew in general.’  Our readers will scarcely need us to add that Bythner’s work is only useful to those who study the Hebrew.” – Spurgeon

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A Jewish Commentary on the Psalms

Kimchi, David – The Longer Commentary of Rabbi David Kimchi on the First Book of Psalms (1-10, 15-17, 19, 22, 24)  A.D. 1160-1235

Kimchi (1160-1235) was a medieval Jewish commentator.

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On Numerous Individual Psalms

1500’s

Cope, Anthony – A Godly Meditation upon 20 Select and Chosen Psalms of the Prophet David  ToC  1547

Cope (c.1486–1551) was an English author.

*  “More curious than valuable.  The style is scholastic and pointless.” – Spurgeon

Rollock, Robert – An Exposition upon some Select Psalms of David  d. 1599

Including expositions of 15 Psalms: 3, 6, 16, 23, 32, 39, 42, 49, 51, 62, 65, 84, 116, 130, 137

** “Rollock’s works are rare.  He wrote in Latin, and his language is made more dull than need be by the translator.  All his writings are masterly.” – Spurgeon

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1600’s

Boys, John – An Exposition of the Proper Psalms used in our English liturgy, together with a reason why the Church did choose the same  ToC  1616

Boys (1571-1625) was a reformed Anglican, who was the Dean of Canterbury.  

*** – “One of the richest of writers.  From his golden pen flows condensed wisdom.  Many of his sentences are worthy to be quoted as gems of the Christian classics.” – Spurgeon

Baker, Richard – Meditations and Disquisitions upon the First Psalm; the Penitential Psalms; and the Seven Consolatory Psalms  1645

This work includes commentary on Psalm 1,6,23,27,30,32,34,38,51,84,102,103,116,130 & 143.

***  “O rare Sir Richard Baker!  Knight of the flowing pen.  His ‘Meditations and Disquisitions’ are altogether marrow and fatness.  We have often tried to quote from him and have found ourselves so embarrassed with riches that we have been inclined to copy the whole book.  Why it has not been reprinted, and made to pass through fifty editions, we cannot tell.  Poor man, he became a surety and smarted, dying in poverty in the Fleet.  Were there any Christians alive in those days?”  – Spurgeon

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Expositions of the Penitential Psalms:  6, (25), 32, 38, 51, 102, 130, 143

1500’s

Fisher, John – Commentary on the Seven Penitential Psalms, vol. 1 (6, 32, 38, 51), 2  (102, 130, 143)  1509  (the numbering of the psalms is one number different in the table of contents, due to a different counting)

Fisher (1469-1535) was a Roman Catholic.

* – “Dry and tedious: in the stiff antique style.” – Spurgeon

Beza, Theodore – Christian Meditations upon Eight Psalms of the Prophet David  ToC  Including a meditation on Psalm 1.  1582

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1600’s

Hayward, John – David’s Tears  (on Ps. 6, 32, 130)  1623

** – “After the Puritanic method: full of point and pith.” – Spurgeon

Donne, John – ‘Sermons on the Penitential Psalms’, Works, vol. 2 (6, 32:1-6), 3 (32:7-11, 51)  d. 1631

*** “A right royal writer, whose every line is a pearl.” – Spurgeon

Simson, Archibald – Exposition on the Seven Psalms of Repentance  PoD  1638

Simson was a Scottish minister.  Includes expositions of: Ps. 6, 25, 32, 38, 51, 130, 143

*** – ‘A marrowy author, full of instruction.’ – Spurgeon

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Psalm 1

1500’s

Beza, Theodore – Christian Meditations upon Eight Psalms of the Prophet David  ToC  Including a meditation on Psalm 1

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1600’s

Stonham, Mathew – A Treatise on the First Psalm  1610

** – “Somewhat dry, scholastic and out of date; but still an interesting and instructive piece of old divinity.” – Spurgeon

Fletcher, Phineas – The Way to Blessedness, a Treatise, or Commentary, on the First Psalm  1632

Smith, Samuel – David’s Blessed Man: a Short Exposition on the First Psalm, directing a man to True Happiness  9th ed. 1635

** “Very popular in its day, and worthily so.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 4

Horton, Thomas – Choice and Practical Expositions on Four Select Psalms: 4, 42, 51, 63  Buy  1675

***“A marvelous homiletical exposition.  Horton’s discourses are very full of divisions, but then he always has plenty of solid matter to divide.  Ministers will find teeming suggestions here.” – Spurgeon

Leighton, Robert – Meditations Practical and Critical on Ps. 4   Buy  †1684  in Works, vol. 2

***“Everything that fell from his pen is worth its weight in diamonds.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 6   (See also Expositions of the Penitential Psalms Above)

Knox, John – An Exposition upon the Sixth Psalm of David, Addressed to Mrs. Bowes  1554  in Works, 3:111-156

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Psalm 8

Leighton, Robert – Meditations Practical and Critical on Ps. 8   Buy  †1684  in Works, vol. 2

***“Everything that fell from his pen is worth its weight in diamonds.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 15

1500’s

Erasmus, Desiderus – An Exposition of Psalm 15 in which is full purely declared the pure and clean behavior that ought to be in the pure Church of Christ, which is the multitude of all true Christen people  d. 1536

Turnbull, Richard – An Exposition upon the 15th Psalm, divided into Four Sermons  1592

Turnbull (d. 1593) was a fellow of Oxford and a reformed minister in London.

** “By a popular and edifying preacher of the olden times.” – Spurgeon

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1600’s

Downame, George – Lectures on the 15th Psalm, wherein besides many other very profitable and necessary matters, the question of usury is plainly and fully decided  1604

** – “Lectures by one of the race of giant divines.” – Spurgeon

Cartwright, Christopher – A Practical and Polemical Commentary or Exposition on the Whole 15th Psalm  ToC  1658

** “A learned and weighty work; not readily met with.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 16

Greenham, Richard – A Godly Exposition of the 16th Psalm  d. 1591

See Spurgeon’s comments on his work on Ps. 119.

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Psalm 20

Bownd, Nicholas – Medicines for the Plague, that is, Godly and Fruitful sermons upon part of the 20th Psalm, full of instructions and comfort: very fit generally for all times of affliction, but more particularly applied to this late visitation of the plague  ToC  Buy  1604  being 21 sermons on verses 1-6

** – “Racy, quaint, extremely rare.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 23

1500’s

Hooper, John – Certain comfortable expositions of Bishop Hooper written in the time of his Tribulation and Imprisonment, upon Psalms 23, 62, 73, and 77  d. 1555

Hooper was one of the English martyrs during the time of Bloody Mary.

* – “The cramped style and antiquated matter repel the reader.” – Spurgeon

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1600’s

Smith, Samuel – The Chief Shepherd; or an Exposition on the 23rd Psalm  1625

**“All the writings of Samuel Smith are good, but not so full of memorable sentences and pithy sayings as certain others of their date.” – Spurgeon

Sedgwick, Obadiah – The Shepherd of Israel, or God’s Pastoral Care over his People, delivered in diverse sermons on the whole Twenty-Third Psalm  1658

Sedgwick was an English puritan and Westminster divine.

** “Sedgwick was one of the most eminent preachers of the time of the Commonwealth.  His commenting is solid and lively.” – Spurgeon

Baker, Richard – ‘Psalm 23’ in Meditations and Disquisitions upon the First Psalm; the Penitential Psalms; and the Seven Consolatory Psalms, pp. 305-320  1645

***  “O rare Sir Richard Baker!  Knight of the flowing pen.  His ‘Meditations and Disquisitions’ are altogether marrow and fatness.  We have often tried to quote from him and have found ourselves so embarrassed with riches that we have been inclined to copy the whole book.  Why it has not been reprinted, and made to pass through fifty editions, we cannot tell.  Poor man, he became a surety and smarted, dying in poverty in the Fleet.  Were there any Christians alive in those days?”  – Spurgeon

Renwick, James – Lecture on Ps. 23  Buy  †1688  23 paragraphs

Renwick was the last Scottish covenanter martyr in Scotland.

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Psalm 24

Boys, John – Psalm 24  1629 in Works

Boys (1571-1625) was a reformed Anglican, who was the Dean of Canterbury.  

*** – “One of the richest of writers.  From his golden pen flows condensed wisdom.  Many of his sentences are worthy to be quoted as gems of the Christian classics.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 25   (See also Expositions of the Penitential Psalms Above)

Mossom, Robert – The Preacher’s Tripartite in Three Books: The First to Raise Devotion in Divine Meditations upon Psalm 25  Buy  1657

*** “Thoroughly devotional, eminently consolatory, and deeply experimental.  Mossom is a fruitful writer.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 27

Pierson, Thomas – Excellent Encouragements Against Afflictions, containing David’s Triumph over Distress on Ps. 27  d. 1633

**“Pierson was not the richest or most overflowing of the old divines, but yet one who stood in the front rank.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 32   (See also Expositions of the Penitential Psalms Above)

Taylor, Thomas – David’s Learning, or The Way to True Happiness in a Commentary upon the 32nd Psalm  1617

**“On account of Taylor’s great knowledge of the Scriptures, he was commonly called ‘the illuminated Doctor.’  Fuller calls him ‘a grave divine, a painful preacher, and a profitable writer.’  He is one of the richest in matter of all the Puritans.” – Spurgeon

Leighton, Robert – Meditations Practical and Critical on Ps. 32   Buy  †1684  in Works, vol. 2

***“Everything that fell from his pen is worth its weight in diamonds.” – Spurgeon

Willard, Samuel – The Truly Blessed Man: or, The Way to be Happy Here, and Forever: being the Substance of Divers sermons preached on Psalm 32  1700

**“One of the first books printed in the United States.  An old-fashioned exposition.  The price is caused by its rarity rather than its value.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 38

  See the Expositions of the Penitential Psalms Above

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Psalm 39

Leighton, Robert – Meditations Practical and Critical on Ps. 39   Buy  †1684  in Works, vol. 2

***“Everything that fell from his pen is worth its weight in diamonds.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 40

Bruce, Robert – Sermon on Ps. 40  1617  from his The Way to True Peace and Rest

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Psalm 42

Sibbes, Richard – The Soul’s Conflict and Victory over itself by Faith  1635 in Works, vol. 1

*** “Mainly upon verses 5 and 11.  Sibbes never wastes the student’s time; he scatters pearls and diamonds with both hands.” – Spurgeon

Horton, Thomas – Choice and Practical Expositions on Four Select Psalms: 4, 42, 51, 63  Buy  1675

***“A marvelous homiletical exposition.  Horton’s discourses are very full of divisions, but then he always has plenty of solid matter to divide.  Ministers will find teeming suggestions here.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 43

Boys, John – An Exposition of the Proper Psalms used in our English liturgy, together with a reason why the Church did choose the same  ToC  1616

Boys (1571-1625) was a reformed Anglican, who was the Dean of Canterbury.  

*** – “One of the richest of writers.  From his golden pen flows condensed wisdom.  Many of his sentences are worthy to be quoted as gems of the Christian classics.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 45

Willet, Andrew – A Treatise of Solomon’s Marriage [Ps. 45:10-16]  1613

Boys, John – An Exposition of the Proper Psalms used in our English liturgy, together with a reason why the Church did choose the same  ToC  1616

Boys (1571-1625) was a reformed Anglican, who was the Dean of Canterbury.  

*** – “One of the richest of writers.  From his golden pen flows condensed wisdom.  Many of his sentences are worthy to be quoted as gems of the Christian classics.” – Spurgeon

Troughton, William – The Mystery of the Marriage Song  ToC  1656  

Troughton (c.1613-c.1686) was a reformed puritan.

*  “An old work with nothing new or striking in it.  Remarkably tame and meagre for a work of that exuberant period.  Let it alone.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 51

1500’s

Luther, Martin – ‘Commentary on Ps. 51’ in Select Works of Luther, vol. 3  tr. Henry Cole, 1824 

**“Luther needs no trumpeter.” – Spurgeon

Anonymous – Meditation of a Penitent Sinner, written in the manner of a paraphrase upon the 51st Psalm of David  d. 1564  In poetry

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1600’s

Page, Samuel – David’s Broken Heart, or, An Exposition upon the Whole Fifty-first Psalm  EEBO  d. 1603

Page was an Anglican.

***“Every page is like a bank note for value.  Here are homiletical materials in abundance.” – Spurgeon

Hieron, Samuel – David’s Penitential Psalm Opened in 30 Several Lectures Thereon  1617

** – “Hieron [1572-1617] was a conforming Puritan.  His works were once exceedingly popular and they are still esteemed.” – Spurgeon

Smith, Samuel – David’s Repentance, or, A Plain and Familiar Exposition of the 51st Psalm  GB  d. 1632

** – “It will be seen from the numerous editions that his work was well received in its author’s lifetime.  He tells us that he spent the spare hours of a long sickness in publishing this short exposition, and thus the world is all the healthier for his illness.” – Spurgeon

Hildersham, Arthur – One Hundred and Fifty-Two Lectures upon Psalm 51  1635

*** “Hildersham was one of the most tried of the Nonconforming ministers, and at the same time one of the most able.  He is copious and discursive, we had almost said long-winded.  Both Willet and Preston speak of him in the highest terms.” – Spurgeon

Horton, Thomas – Choice and Practical Expositions on Four Select Psalms: 4, 42, 51, 63  Buy  1675

***“A marvelous homiletical exposition.  Horton’s discourses are very full of divisions, but then he always has plenty of solid matter to divide.  Ministers will find teeming suggestions here.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 62

Hooper, John – Certain Comfortable Expositions of Bishop Hooper written in the time of his Tribulation and Imprisonment, upon Psalms 23, 62, 73, and 77  d. 1555

Hooper was one of the English martyrs during the time of Bloody Mary.

* – “The cramped style and antiquated matter repel the reader.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 63

Horton, Thomas – Choice and Practical Expositions on Four Select Psalms: 4, 42, 51, 63  Buy  1675

***“A marvelous homiletical exposition.  Horton’s discourses are very full of divisions, but then he always has plenty of solid matter to divide.  Ministers will find teeming suggestions here.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 67

Boys, John –Deus Misereatur [God be merciful], the 67th Psalm’   1629 in Works

Boys (1571-1625) was a reformed Anglican, who was the Dean of Canterbury.  

*** – “One of the richest of writers.  From his golden pen flows condensed wisdom.  Many of his sentences are worthy to be quoted as gems of the Christian classics.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 73

1500’s

Hooper, John – Certain comfortable expositions of Bishop Hooper written in the time of his Tribulation and Imprisonment, upon Psalms 23, 62, 73, and 77  d. 1555

Hooper was one of the English martyrs during the time of Bloody Mary.

* – “The cramped style and antiquated matter repel the reader.” – Spurgeon

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1600’s

Parry, Edward – David Restored; or an Antidote against the Prosperity of the Wicked and the Afflictions of the Just  ToC  1660

**“Not super-excellent, nor free from blemishes, but containing much of sterling value.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 76

Bruce, Robert – 2 Sermons on Ps. 76  1617  from his The Way to True Peace and Rest

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Psalm 77

Hooper, John – Certain comfortable expositions of Bishop Hooper written in the time of his Tribulation and Imprisonment, upon Psalms 23, 62, 73, and 77  d. 1555

Hooper was one of the English martyrs during the time of Bloody Mary.

* – “The cramped style and antiquated matter repel the reader.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 82

Hall, Thomas – The Beauty of Magistracy, and Exposition of Psalm 82 in Swinnock’s Works, vol. 4, pp. 147-300

**“This exposition has always nestled in the bosom of Swinnock’s works.  We agree with Dr. Jenkyn’s criticism: ‘The style is terse and clear, though grave and theological, and the matter is solid and judicious.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 84

1500’s

Hemmingsen, Neils – The Faith of the Church Militant, Most effectually described in this exposition of the 84th Psalm  1581

Hemmingsen was a Lutheran.

* “A Danish divine of high repute in his own day.  Some of his works were turned into English; but the translations, like the originals, are now left in undeserved oblivion.” – Spurgeon

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1600’s

Pierson, Thomas – Excellent Encouragements Against Afflictions, containing David’s Heart’s Desire on Ps. 84  d. 1633

**“Pierson was not the richest or most overflowing of the old divines, but yet one who stood in the front rank.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 85

Pierson, Thomas – Excellent Encouragements Against Afflictions, containing the Church’s Exercise under Affliction on Ps. 85  d. 1633

**“Pierson was not the richest or most overflowing of the old divines, but yet one who stood in the front rank.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 87

Pierson, Thomas – Excellent Encouragements Against Afflictions, containing the Great Charter of the Church on Ps. 87  d. 1633

**“Pierson was not the richest or most overflowing of the old divines, but yet one who stood in the front rank.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 90

Smith, Samuel – Moses, his Prayer  1656

** See Spurgeon’s notes on his works on Ps. 1 & 51.

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Psalm 91

Bridge, William – The Refuge: containing the righteous man’s habitation in the time of plague and pestilence, being a brief exposition of the 91st Psalm  d. 1671

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Psalm 92

Cameron, Richard – Lecture on Ps. 92  Buy  †1680  6 pp., from Sermons in the Time of Persecution

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Psalm 95

Boys, John – Venite Exultemus Domino [‘Oh Come Let us Exult the Lord’ on Ps. 95]    1629 in Works

Boys (1571-1625) was a reformed Anglican, who was the Dean of Canterbury.  

*** – “One of the richest of writers.  From his golden pen flows condensed wisdom.  Many of his sentences are worthy to be quoted as gems of the Christian classics.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 98

Boys, John – Psalms in the Evening Office: Ps. 98    1629 in Works

Boys (1571-1625) was a reformed Anglican, who was the Dean of Canterbury.  

*** – “One of the richest of writers.  From his golden pen flows condensed wisdom.  Many of his sentences are worthy to be quoted as gems of the Christian classics.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 100

Boys, John – ‘Jubilate Deo, Ps. 100’    1629 in Works

Boys (1571-1625) was a reformed Anglican, who was the Dean of Canterbury.  

*** – “One of the richest of writers.  From his golden pen flows condensed wisdom.  Many of his sentences are worthy to be quoted as gems of the Christian classics.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 101

Horne, Robert – The Christian governor in the commonwealth, and private families described by David, in his 101st Psalm, Guiding all men in a right course to heaven  1614

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Psalm 102

See the Expositions of the Penitential Psalms Above

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Psalm 107

Hyperius, Andreas – A Special Treatise of God’s Providence and of Comforts against all kind of crosses and calamities to be drawn from the same. With an exposition of the 107th Psalm  ToC  1588  d. 1564

PRDL lists Hyperius as Reformed.

** – “This author has written in Latin upon many subjects, but his works are now little known.  He was a learned Lutheran.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 110

Reynolds, Edward – Explication of the 110th Psalm  1632

***“Surpassingly clear and elaborate.  Reynolds was a man of vast learning and thoroughly evangelical in spirit.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 116

Gouge, William – The Saint’s Sacrifice, or, a commentary on the 116th Psalm, which is a gratulatory psalm for deliverance from deadly distress  IA  1632

** “Gouge’s method of cutting up his exposition into sections and discussing everything in proportions, is very tedious to the reader, but we judge it to be advantageous to the preacher.  At any rate Gouge has often given us a hint.  He was a man of great learning.” – Spurgeon

Sclater, William – Sermons Experimental: on Psalms 116 & 117.  Very Useful for a Wounded Spirit  ToC  1638

Sclater (1575-1626) was a reformed puritan.

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Psalm 117

Sclater, William – Sermons Experimental: on Psalms 116 & 117.  Very Useful for a Wounded Spirit  ToC  1638

Sclater (1575-1626) was a reformed puritan.

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Psalm 118

Boys, John – Psalm 118   1629 in Works

Boys (1571-1625) was a reformed Anglican, who was the Dean of Canterbury.  

*** – “One of the richest of writers.  From his golden pen flows condensed wisdom.  Many of his sentences are worthy to be quoted as gems of the Christian classics.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 119

1500’s

Calvin, John – Sermons on Psalm 119  d. 1564  22 sermons, a sermon on each section

Greenham, Richard – An Exposition of the 119th Psalm  1612  d. 1591

** – “We regret that this comment is not published separately, and is only to be procured by purchasing the rest of Greenham’s works.  The style, however, is antique and cramped, and Manton and Bridges are quite enough.” – Spurgeon

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1600’s

Cowper, William – A Holy Alphabet for Sion’s Scholars. A Commentary upon the 119th Psalm  1613

Cowper (1566-1619) was the Anglican bishop of Galloway.

**“Dr. M’Crie gives a high character to all Cowper’s works, and says that a vein of practical piety runs through them, while the style is remarkable for ease and fluency.  This remark applies emphatically to the ‘Holy Alphabet’.  We have found it very delightful reading.” – Spurgeon

Manton, Thomas – 190 sermons on the 119th Psalm, vols. 1 (vv. 1-59), 2 (60-123), 3 (124-End)  d. 1677

*** “Fully up to Manton’s highest mark, and he is well known to have been one of the chief of the Puritan brotherhood.  The work is long, but that results only from the abundance of the matter.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 120-134  The Psalms of Degrees

Luther, Martin – A Commentary upon the Fifteen Psalms, called ‘Psalms of Degrees’  ToC  d. 1546

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Psalm 122

Willet, Andrew – A Brief Exposition of Psalm 122  1603

* – “Willet ought to have known better than to twist a psalm to the honor and glory of James I.  As a learned man he says good things, and as a courtier foolish things.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 130   (See also Expositions of the Penitential Psalms Above)

1500’s

Rollock, Robert – 2 Sermons on Ps. 130  23 pp., from his Select Works  Buy, vol. 1, pp. 457-481  †1599

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1600’s

Sibbes, Richard – The Saint’s Comforts: an Exposition upon Ps. 130 in Works, vol. 6  1638

** – “Notes on five verses only.  Published without the author’s sanction, it is incomplete, but very full as far as it goes, and considering its brevity.” – Spurgeon

Owen, John – Practical Exposition on Ps. 130  1669  566 pages  

***“One of the best known and most esteemed of John Owen’s works.  It is unnecessary to say that he is the prince of divines.  to master his works is to be a profound theologian.  Owen is said to be prolix, but it would be truer to say that he is condensed.  His style is heavy because he gives notes of what he might have said, and passes on without fully developing the great thoughts of his capacious mind.  He requires hard study, and none of us ought to grudge it.” – Spurgeon

Hutcheson, George – 45 Sermons upon the 130th Psalm  ToC  †1674

***“We have already advised the purchase of anything and everything by Hutcheson.  Be sure not to confound this with [Anne] Hutchinson [the New England antinomian heretic].” – Spurgeon

Leighton, Robert – Meditations Practical and Critical on Ps 130   Buy  †1684  in Works, vol. 2

***“Everything that fell from his pen is worth its weight in diamonds.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 131

Manton, Thomas – 5 Sermons upon Ps. 131  56 pp. in Works, vol. 21, p. 406 ff.

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Psalm 143

See the Expositions of the Penitential Psalms Above

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Psalm 148

Vines, Richard – The Saint’s Nearness to God, being a discourse upon part of the 148th Psalm  ToC  †1656

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Psalm 150

Boys, John – An Exposition of the Last Psalm delivered in a Sermon  1613

Boys (1571-1625) was a reformed Anglican, who was the Dean of Canterbury.

*** – “One of the richest of writers.  From his golden pen flows condensed wisdom.  Many of his sentences are worthy to be quoted as gems of the Christian classics.” – Spurgeon


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Proverbs

1500’s

Cope, Michael – A Godly and Learned Exposition upon the Proverbs of Solomon  1580

Cope was a minister in Geneva.

Wilcox, Thomas – A Short, yet Sound Commentary written on that worthy work called the Proverbs of Solomon  ToC  1589

Wilcox (c.1549-1608) was a reformed puritan.

**  ‘Very old.  the notes are brief, but furnish many hints for sermons.’  ‘Wilcocks briefly sums up the teaching of the verses, and so aids in suggesting topics; in other respects he is rather wearying.’ – Spurgeon

Muffett, Peter – A Commentary on the Whole Book of Proverbs  2nd ed. 1594

** “Homely, but not very striking.  Mr. Nichol’s choice of commentators for reprinting was not a wise one.”

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1600’s

Jermin, Michael – Paraphrastical Meditations upon the Book of Proverbs  1638

Jermin (1590-1659) was a Reformed Anglican.

**“Very antique and full of Latin quotations.  Jermin does not err in excessive spirituality, but the reverse.  Those who can put up with his style will be repaid by his quaint learning.” – Spurgeon

Leigh, Edward – Annotations on Five Poetical Books of the Old Testament: Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and Canticles  1657

**  ‘Good, brief notes.  Antique, but still prized.’ – Spurgeon

Jackson, Arthur – Annotations upon Job, the Psalms, the Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and the Song of Solomon  1658

“In 1653, Arthur Jackson, Preacher of God’s Word in Wood Street, London, issued four volumes upon the Old Testament, which appear to have been the result of his pulpit expositions to his people.  Valuable his works would be if there were no better, but they are not comparable to others already and afterwards mentioned.  You can do without him, but he is a reputable author.” – Spurgeon

Blair, Robert – [On Proverbs, but Title Unknown]  †1666

This work was part of the Scottish divines’ project to produce popular commentaries on difficult books of the Bible, which series included the authors: David Dickson, Alexander Nisbet, George Hutcheson and James Fergusson.  Blair finished this work in manuscript, but it was never published.

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Chapters in Proverbs

Taylor, Francis – An Exposition with Practical Observations upon the Three First Chapters of the Proverbs  1645  An Exposition upon chs. 4-9  1657

Taylor was a Westminster divine.

*** “Two volumes (in one) of rich, old fashioned Puritan divinity.” – Spurgeon

Hammond, Henry – A Paraphrase and Annotations upon the Psalms, as also upon the Ten First Chapters of the) Proverbs  1684  d. 1660

Hammond was an Arminian, Latitudinarian Anglican.  Matthew Henry was able to quote from Hammond throughout his commentary.

** “Much esteemed, and deservedly so.  Hammond’s weighty tome is somewhat dry, and many of his remarks are rather those of a linguist than of a divine, but he touches on many matters which others omit, and is, upon the whole, an expositor of singular merit.”  – Spurgeon

Dod, John & Cleaver, Robert – A Plain and Familiar Exposition of Proverbs chs. 1-2 & chs. 13-14  1608-9  The authors also at least commented on chs. 9-20 & 28-30 as well.  References to a number of these works can be found at EEBO.

**“Both Dod and Cleaver were popular as preachers, and their joint works were widely circulated.  this book can rarely be met with entire.” – Spurgeon

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Topical Arrangement of the Proverbs

1600’s

Hall, Joseph – Salomon’s Divine Arts, of: 1. Ethics, 2. Politics, 3. Economics that is; the government of: 1. Behavior, 2. Commonwealth, 3. Family.  Drawn into method, out of his Proverbs & Ecclesiastes.  With an Open and Plain Paraphrase upon the Song of Songs  1609

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Ecclesiastes

1500’s

Luther, Martin – An Exposition of Solomon’s book called Ecclesiastes, or the preacher  ToC  Buy  d. 1546

**“Even the British Museum authorities have been unable to find this octavo for us, though it is mentioned in their catalogue.” – Spurgeon

Serranus, John – A Godly and Learned Commentary upon Ecclesiastes  ToC  1585  d. 1552

*  “Serranus was a Protestant pastor at Nismes, of such moderate opinions, and such objectionable modes of stating them, that he was about equally abhorred by Romanists and Protestants.  He is said to have been very inaccurate in his learning.” – Spurgeon

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1600’s

Broughton, Hugh – A Commentary upon Coheleth, or Ecclesiastes  1605

Broughton was a reformed Anglican.

* “Broughton was a far-famed and rather pretentious Hebraist whom Dr. Gill quoted as an authority.  His work is nearly obsolete, but its loss is not a severe one.” – Spurgeon

Granger, Thomas – A Familiar Exposition, or Commentary, on Ecclesiastes, wherein the World’s Vanity and the True Felicity are Plainly Deciphered  1621  344 pp.

** – ” Very antique, containing many obsolete and coarse phrases; but pithy and quaint.” – Spurgeon

Pemble, William – Salomon’s Recantation and Repentance, or the Book of Ecclesiastes Briefly and Fully Explained in Works, pp. 281-344  †1623  

Pemble was a Reformed puritan.

** – “Anthony a Wood calls Pemble ‘a famous preacher, a skillful linguist, a good orator, and an ornament to society.’  Moreover, he was a learned Calvinistic divine.  This ‘Recantation’ is a minor production.  The style is scholastic, with arrangements of the subjects such as render it hard to read.  We confess we are disappointed with it.” – Spurgeon

Cotton, John – A Brief Exposition with Practical Observations upon the Whole Book of Ecclesiastes  †1652  Cotton was the New England puritan.

** “By a great linguist and sound divine.  Ecclesiastes is not a book to be expounded verse by verse; but Cotton does it as well as anyone.” – Spurgeon

Leigh, Edward – Annotations on Five Poetical Books of the Old Testament: Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and Canticles  1657

**  ‘Good, brief notes.  Antique, but still prized.’ – Spurgeon

Jackson, Arthur – Annotations upon Job, the Psalms, the Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and the Song of Solomon  1658

“In 1653, Arthur Jackson, Preacher of God’s Word in Wood Street, London, issued four volumes upon the Old Testament, which appear to have been the result of his pulpit expositions to his people.  Valuable his works would be if there were no better, but they are not comparable to others already and afterwards mentioned.  You can do without him, but he is a reputable author.” – Spurgeon

Jermin, Michael – A Commentary upon the Whole Book of Ecclesiastes, or The Preacher  1659

Jermin (1590-1659) was a Reformed Anglican.

** – “The school to which Jermin belonged delighted to display their learning, of which they had no small share; they excelled in wise sayings, but not in unction.  the fruit is ripe, but lacks flavor.” – Spurgeon

Reynolds, Edward – A Commentary on the Book of Ecclesiastes  d. 1676

** – “See [the] Westminster Assembly’s Annotations, for which Reynolds wrote this.  He is always good.” – Spurgeon

Anonymous – Annotations on the Book of Ecclesiastes  London, printed by Streater  1669  This book is the same as that by Edward Reynolds.

*  “By no means remarkable, except for some extreme rarity.” – Spurgeon

Nisbet, Alexander – An Exposition with Practical Observations upon the Book of Ecclesiastes  ToC  Pod  †1669

** – ‘One of those solid works which learned Scotch divines of the seventeenth century have left us in considerable numbers.  In our judgment it is as heavy as it is weighty.’ – Surgeon

Sikes, George – An Exposition of Ecclesiastes, or, The Preacher  1680

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Commentary on Ecclesiastes in Latin

Beza, Theodore – Ecclesiastes: Solomon’s Sermon to the People about Life thus set forth, so that they may achieve True and Eternal Happiness, in Paraphrase and Opened by Theodore Beza  1588  88 pp.

** – “Sure to be weighty and instructive.  It is exceedingly rare.” – Spurgeon, on the English translation

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Ecclesiastes Arranged by Subject with a Commentary

Hall, Joseph – Salomon’s Divine Arts, of: 1. Ethics, 2. Politics, 3. Economics that is; the government of: 1. Behavior, 2. Commonwealth, 3. Family.  Drawn into method, out of his Proverbs & Ecclesiastes.  With an Open and Plain Paraphrase upon the Song of Songs  1609

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Chapters in Ecclesiastes

Gifford, George – Eight Sermons, upon the First Four Chapters, and part of the Fifth, of Ecclesiastes  1589

Gifford (1547-1600) was a Reformed puritan.

Smith, John – King Solomon’s Portraiture of Old Age, wherein is contained a Sacred Anatomy both of Soul and Body, with an account of all these Mystical and Enigmatical Symptoms, expressed in the six former verses of Eccl. 12, made plain and easy  1666

** – “A curious book by a physician, who brings his anatomical knoweldge to bear upon the 12th chapter of Ecclesiastes, and tries to show that Solomon understood the circulation of the blood, etc.  Matthew Poole introduced the substance of this treatise into his Synopsis, and in that huge compilation he speaks eulogistically of the author, with whom he resided.  We mention it because of its singularity.” – Spurgeon

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Song of Solomon

1500’s

Brucioli, Antonio – A Commentary upon the Canticle of Canticles  d. 1566

Wilcox, Thomas – An Exposition upon the Book of the Canticles, otherwise called Solomon’s Song  1585  

Wilcox (1549-1608) was a reformed puritan.

** – “Very old.  the notes are brief, but furnish many hints for sermons.”  “Short, and somewhat in the manner of a paraphrase.  This venerable author gives a doctrinal summary of each verse, and from this we have frequently been directed to a subject of discourse.” – Spurgeon

Fenner, Dudley – The Song of Solomon, in Verse, with an Exposition  1587

Fenner was Reformed.

* “Moody Stuart says: ‘This is a faithful and excellent translation, accompanied by an admirable exposition.  There is no poetry in it, but the renderings are often good, and the comment valuable.’  We have not met with it.” – Spurgeon

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1600’s

Clapham, Henoch – The Song of Songs Expounded  1603 

Clapham (fl.1585-1614) was a puritan.

* “Clapham was a voluminous author of very remarkable attainments.  He wrote also on the first fourteen chapters of Genesis.  This work is rare as angel’s visits.” – Spurgeon

Hall, Joseph – An Open and Plain Paraphrase upon the Song of Songs  1609  in Salomon’s Divine Arts

Dove, John – The Conversion of Solomon, a Direction to holiness of Life; handled by way of Commentary upon the Whole Book of Canticles  1613  †1618  Dove was a Reformed Anglican.

*“A quaint old work.  The student will do better with the moderns.  Moreover, this Dove is rare, and seldom lights on poor men’s shelves.” – Spurgeon

Finch, Henry – An Exposition of the Song of Solomon: called Canticles, together with profitable observations collected out of the same  1615

This commentary was published by the Westminster divine, William Gouge.

Ainsworth, Henry – Annotations upon the Five Books of Moses, the Book of the Psalms, and Song of Songs, or, Canticles, vol. 2, p. 681 ff.  d. 1622

***  ‘Thoroughly learned.  Though old, not out of date.’ – Spurgeon

‘Ainsworth was a celebrated scholar and an excellent divine.  His uncommon skill in Hebrew learning, and his excellent commentaries on the Scripture are held in high reputation to this day.’ – Benjamin Brook, ‘Lives of the Puritans’

Hildersham, Arthur – The Canticles, or Song of Solomon Paraphrased and Explained by Diverse Other Texts of Scriptures, Very Useful  GB  †1632  99 pp. with an edition of the Song in verse appended

Homes, Nathaniel – A Commentary on the Canticles  1652  

Homes (1599-1678) was a puritan.

** – “This goes to the very marrow of spiritual teaching, and uses every word and syllable in a deeply experimental manner with great unction and power.  Homes, however, spiritualizes too much, and is both too luscious in expression and too prolix for these degenerate days.” – Spurgeon

Robotham, John – An Exposition on the Whole Book of Solomon’s Song; commonly called the Canticles  1652

**“Very solid; but not to be compared with Durham.  It is just a little dull and common place.”

Leigh, Edward – Annotations on Five Poetical Books of the Old Testament: Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and Canticles  1657

**  ‘Good, brief notes.  Antique, but still prized.’ – Spurgeon

Guild, William – Love’s intercourse between the Lamb and his Bride, Christ and his Church.  Or, A clear explication and application of the Song of Solomon  1657

** – ‘A rare old work: but we prefer Durham.  The author was one of the better sort of the Scotch Episcopalians.’  – Spurgeon

Durham, James – The Key of the Canticles: an Exposition of the Song of Solomon  EEBO  Buy  †1658

Durham was an influential Scottish covenanter, friends with Samuel Rutherford and George Gillespie.  This commentary has been reprinted by the Banner of Truth.

*** – ‘Durham is always good, and he is at his best upon the Canticles.  He gives us the essence of the good matter.  For practical use this work is perhaps more valuable than any other Key to the Song.’  – Spurgeon

Jackson, Arthur – Annotations upon Job, the Psalms, the Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and the Song of Solomon  1658

“In 1653, Arthur Jackson, Preacher of God’s Word in Wood Street, London, issued four volumes upon the Old Testament, which appear to have been the result of his pulpit expositions to his people.  Valuable his works would be if there were no better, but they are not comparable to others already and afterwards mentioned.  You can do without him, but he is a reputable author.” – Spurgeon

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Portions Throughout the Song of Solomon

1600’s

Gifford, George – Fifteen Sermons upon the Song of Solomon  †1600  Gifford was a Reformed puritan.

** “We have several times met with this writer’s name coupled with that of Brightman as in his day regarded as a very learned writer, but we cannot procure his work.  Possibly some reader of this catalogue may yet present us with it.  We beg to assure him of the gratitude which we already feel, in the form of ‘a lively sense of favors to come’.” – Spurgeon

Rutherford, Samuel – Communion Sermons (see sermons 9, 11-12 & 14 on Song 2:8-12,14-17; 5:1-2)  Buy, ‘The Spouse’s Longing for Christ’ & ‘The Church Seeking her Lord’ (Song 5:3-10)  Buy  †1661

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Chapters in the Song

Collinges, John – The Intercourses of Divine Love Betwixt Christ and his Church, or, The Particular Believing Soul Metaphorically Expressed by Solomon in the First Chapter of the Canticles  63 sermons, 1683  909 pp.  Collinges also had a similar commentary on ch. 2 of the Song, but it does not appear to be online.

*** – ‘Who can pretend to biblical learning who has not made himself familiar with the great writers who spent a life in explaining some one sacred book?… Collinges, with his nine hundred and nine pages upon one chapter of the Song, will not be too full for the preacher’s use.’  

‘Nine hundred and nine quarto pages upon one chapter is more than enough.  The materials are gathered from many sources and make up a mass of wealth.  On the second chapter there are five hundred and thirty pages.  It would try the constitutions of many modern divines to read what these Puritans found it a pleasure to write.  When shall we see their like?’ – Spurgeon

Beza, Theodore – Sermons upon the Three First chapters of the Canticle of Canticles: wherein are handled the chiefest points of religion controversed and debated between us and the adversary at this day, especially touching the true Jesus Christ and the true church, and the certain and infallible marks both of the one and of the other  ToC  1587

*** “These thirty-one sermons are a well of instruction, very precious and refreshing.  The unabbreviated title indicates a controversial use of the Song, and we were therefore prepared to lament the invasion of the dove’s nest of the Canticles by the eagle of debate; but we were agreeably disappointed, for we found much less of argument, and much more of the Well-Beloved than we looked for.” – Spurgeon

Sibbes, Richard – Bowels Opened; or a Discovery of the Near and Dear Love, Union and Communion betwixt Christ and the Church.  Sermons on Canticles chs. 4:16-6:3  EEBO  1639

“Nowhere was the epithet ‘mellifluous’ more appropriate than in Sibbes’s series of twenty sermons on the fourth, fifth, and sixth chapters of the Song of Solomon.” – Hughes Oliphant Old

[‘Mellifluous’: a voice or words that are sweet or musical; pleasant to hear.  From the Latin ‘mel’: honey; ‘fluere’: to flow.]

*** – “Sibbes never writes ill.  His repute is such that we need only mention him.  His title is most unfortunate, but in all else his ‘Discovery’ is worthy of our commendation.” – Spurgeon

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Prophetic-Historical Interpretations of the Song  (not recommended)

1600’s

Brightman, Thomas – A Commentary on the Canticles or the Song of Solomon  d. 1607

*“Brightman was a writer of high renown among the prophetic students of the seventeenth century.  With singular strength of the visionary faculties he sees in the Canticles ‘the whole condition of the church from the time of David, till time shall be no more.’  Expounding on this theory needs an acrobatic imagination.” – Spurgeon

Cotton, John A Brief Exposition of Canticles, or, lively describing the estate of the Church in all the ages thereof, both Jewish and Christian, to this day  1642

* – “Cotton explains the sacred love-song historically, and misses much of its sweetness by so doing.  We should never care to read his exposition while Durham, and Gill, and Moody Stuart are to be had.” – Spurgeon

Brayne, John – An Exposition upon the Canticles  1651

Beverley, Thomas –  An Exposition of the Divinely Prophetic Song of Songs which is Solomon’s, beginning with the reign of David and Solomon, ending in the glorious kingdom of our Lord Jesus Christ, adjusted to the expositor’s line of time, and illustrating it and composed into Verse  1687

* – “This maundering author finds in Canticles the history of the church from David to our Lord, and rhymes no end of rubbish thereon.  truly there is no end to the foolishness of expositors.  We suppose there must be a public for which they cater, and a very foolish public it must be.” – Spurgeon

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Isaiah

Reformer

Luther, Martin 

Works  Buy

Vol. 16: Lectures on Isaiah – Chapters 1-39
Vol. 17: Lectures on Isaiah – Chapters 40-66

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1600’s

Day, William – An Exposition of the Book of Isaiah  ToC  1654

Day (†1684) was an Anglican.

* – “Day does not throw much light upon the text: he says he wrote for his children, and certainly he is childish enough.” – Spurgeon

Rutherford, Samuel – [On Isaiah, but title unknown]  in manuscript

Whatever portion of the work was completed, was lost.

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Jewish Commentary on Isaiah

Ibn Ezra, Abraham  (1089-1164)

The Commentary of Ibn Ezra on Isaiah, vols. 1 (Whole Commentary), 2 (Translation of Isaiah), 3 (Dictionary)

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Chapters in Isaiah

In the First Half of Isaiah

Rogers, Nehemiah – The Wild Vine: or, An Exposition on Isaiah’s Parabolic Song of the Beloved, Isa. 5  ToC  Buy

Leighton, Robert – 3 Lectures on Isa. 6  †1684  18 pp., in Works  Buy, vol. 2

Wycliff, John – ‘The Thanksgiving of Israel, Isa. 12’  in Select English Works of John Wycliff, vol. 3, part 1, p. 5-8

Bruce, Robert – 6 Sermons on Hezekiah’s Sickness, Isa. 38  1617  115 pp., from The Way to True Peace and Rest, pp. 157-272

Calvin, John – 4 Sermons upon the Song that Hezekiah made after he had been sick and afflicted by the hand of God, contained in the 38th chapter of Isaiah  d. 1564 

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Isaiah 53

Calvert, Thomas – Mel Caeli, Medulla Evangelii [The Honey of Heaven, the Marrow of the Gospel]; or, The Prophet Isaiah’s Crucifix.  An Exposition of the 53rd Chapter of Isaiah  Buy  1657

*** “Precious and practical.  Just what the title would lead us to expect–marrow and fatness; honey from the Rock, Christ Jesus.” – Spurgeon

Durham, James – Christ Crucified, 72 Sermons on Isa. 53, vols. 12  Buy  †1658

***“This is marrow indeed.  We need say no more: Durham is a prince among spiritual expositors.” – Spurgeon

Manton, Thomas  †1677

A Practical Exposition upon the 53rd Chapter of Isaiah  307 pp. in Works, vol. 3, pp. 187-494

*** – “Manton needs no praise from us.  Whatever he does is done in a style worthy of a chief among theologians.  He is, however, seldom too brief, and his own bulk hinders his being read.  Preachers of long sermons should take a hint from this.”

ed. MacDonogh, T.M. – Manton Abridged on Isaiah’s Report of the Messiah, as revealed in the 53rd chapter of his Prophecy, expounded in a series of lectures  1858  410 pp.

** – “This is a serving up of the [previous] work in the form of lectures.  We do not admire abridgments, and especially those which make alterations and additions; still it is likely that many have read Macdonogh’s Manton who might never have fallen in with Manton’s Manton.” – Spurgeon

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Jeremiah

None

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Lamentations

1500’s
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Udall (c.1560-1592) was a reformed puritan.
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**“In this extremely rare work the author has labored after brevity, and has given the abridgment of many discourses; hence, to those who can procure it, it is all the more useful.” – Spurgeon

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1600’s

Broughton, Hugh – The Lamentations of Jeremy translated, with Explications  1608
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Broughton (1549-1612) was a reformed Anglican.
 
* “Incomprehensible.  One of Broughton’s wilder pieces.  It may as well die.” – Spurgeon
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Hull, John – Exposition upon part of Lamentations  1618
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Hull (c.1570-1627) was reformed.
 
***“Full of quaintnesses.  Marrowy throughout.” – Spurgeon
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Swift, Daniel – Zion’s Sufferings: an Exposition of Lamentations 5  1654
 
**“Strong, rough, coarse.  Excessively rare.” – Spurgeon

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Ezekiel

Greenhill, William – An Exposition of Ezekiel  1645-1667

*** – “We always get something out of Greenhill whenever we refer to him.  He had not, of course, the critical skill of the present day, but his spiritual insight was keen.  He rather commented on a passage than expounded it.” – Spurgeon

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On the Last Part of Ezekiel

Alleine, William – The Mystery of the Temple and City Described in the Nine Last Chapters of Ezekiel Unfolded  1679

** “Very rare; will interest interpreters of prophecy.” – Spurgeon

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Daniel

1600’s

Willlet, Andrew – A Six-fold commentary upon the Most Divine Prophecy of Daniel  1610

Willet (1562–1621)

**  “Dr. Williams says that this is a work of much information, as it contains the ‘opinions of many authors on each point of difficulty.’  He adds that in none of his expositions does Willet ‘discover more skill and judgment than in the present work.'” – Spurgeon

Huit, Ephraim – The Whole Prophecy of Daniel Explained, by a Paraphrase, analysis and brief comment: wherein the several visions showed to the prophet are clearly interpreted, and the application thereof vindicated against dissenting opinions   1643

**  “Huit’s short doctrinal summaries of the verses will bring useful subjects before the preacher’s mind; otherwise Huit is not very remarkable.” – Spurgeon

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On the Major Prophetic Passages of Daniel

1500’s

Broughton, Hugh – An Apology in brief assertions defending that our Lord died in the time properly foretold to Daniel  1592

Broughton was a reformed Anglican.

* “This author was pedantic and eccentric, but yet a man of real learning.  His works have almost disappeared.  In his own day some considered him a sage and others a quack.  He was a little of both.” – Spurgeon

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1600’s

Brightman, Thomas – A Most Comfortable Exposition of the Last and Most Difficult Part of the Prophecy of Daniel, from 11:26-12:13, wherein the Restoring of the Jews and their calling to the Faith of Christ after the utter overthrow of their three last enemies is set forth in lively colors  †1607

* – “This exposition and the author’s commentary on Canticles are appended to his work on Revelation, and do not appear to have been published separately.  In his title-page Brightman is called a bright and worthy man, and in the preface we are told that ‘he shined every way and was a Brightman indeed.’  His work is rather a curiousity tan a treasure.” – Spurgeon

Du Moulin, Pierre – The Prophecy Contained in Dan. 7  1613  26 pp.

Moulin (1568–1658) was a Huguenot minister in France.

Parker, Thomas – The Visions and Prophecies of Daniel Expounded  ToC  1646

Parker (1595–1677)  an English, Reformed, nonconforming clergyman and a founder of Newbury, Massachusetts.

*“This learned book is enough to perplex and distract any ordinary mortal, but probably Dr. Cumming and brethren of his school would revel in it.  We had sooner read a table of logarithms.” – Spurgeon

More, Henry – A Plain and Continued Exposition of the Several Prophecies or divine visions of the prophet Daniel  1681

*“If a man had no more than More on Daniel he would certainly long for more, and need a work more spiritual and more suggestive.” – Spurgeon

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Daniel Commentary in Latin

Broughton, Hugh – Commentary on Daniel  1599

Broughton was a reformed Anglican.

* “This author was pedantic and eccentric, but yet a man of real learning.  His works have almost disappeared.  In his own day some considered him a sage and others a quack.  He was a little of both.” – Spurgeon

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All of the Minor Prophets

1500’s

Daneau, Lambert – A Fruitful Commentary upon the Twelve Small Prophets brief, plain, and easy, going over the same verse by verse, and showing everywhere the method, points of doctrine, and figures of rhetoric, to the no small profit of all godly and well disposed readers, with very necessary fore-notes for the understanding of both of these, and also all other the prophets  ToC  1594

*  “Eminent French Protestant divine (1530-1596).”  “A translation of a work famous in its own day, but of small service now.” – Spurgeon

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1600’s

Hutcheson, George – A Brief Exposition of the 12 Small Prophets  (Hosea-Malachi)  Buy  1657

Hutcheson was a Scottish Covenanter.  Note that the Sovereign Grace Publishers reprint only contains 6 of the minor prophets (see the review on Amazon).

*** – ‘Get it.  Hutcheson is always rich.  He resembles Dickson.’ – Spurgeon

Stokes, David – A Paraphrastical Explication of the Twelve Minor Prophets, viz. Hosea, Joel, Amos, Obadiah, Jonah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, Haggai, Zechariah, Malachi  1659

Stokes (1591?-1669) was a Cambridge educated, (Anglican?) priest.  The work has a recommendatory preface by John Pearson, an Anglican divine, known for his standard work on the Apostles’ Creed.

**  “Of no importance.” – Spurgeon

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Hosea

1500’s

Luther, Martin – Works, vol. 18: Minor Prophets I: Hosea & Malachi  Buy

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1600’s

Burroughs, Jeremiah – An Exposition of the Prophesy of Hosea, vols. 1 (chs. 1-3), 2 (4-7), 3 (8-10),  4 (11-13)  Buy  1643  Does not include ch. 14, but see Reynolds and Sibbes

***“Masterly.  A vast treasure-house of experimental exposition.  With the exception of Adams, we prefer it to any other of the expositions reprinted under the editorship of Mr. Sherman.” – Spurgeon

Pococke, Edward – A Commentary on the Prophecy of Hosea  d. 1691

Pococke (1604-1691) was a reformed Anglican.

** – “Orme says Pocock was ‘one of the finest Oriental scholars, and certainly the first Arabic scholar of his age.’  His book is a treasury filed with the products of laborious research.” – Spurgeon

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Chapters in Hosea

1600’s

Downame, John – Lectures upon the Four First Chapters of the Prophecy of Hosea, wherein the text is expounded and cleared, and such profitable instructions observed, and applied, as naturally arise out of this holy Scripture, and are fit for these times  ToC  1608

***“An exposition of the richest kind.  Get it by all means, if you can.” – Spurgeon

Smith, Samuel – An Exposition upon the Sixth Chapter of the Prophesy of Hosea  ToC  1616

*** “In Smith’s usual quiet, rich, expository manner.” – Spurgeon

Sibbes, Richard – The Returning Backslider, or a Commentary upon Hosea 14  1639

*** “Manton says of Sibbes, that he had a peculiar gift in unfolding the great mysteries of the Gospel in a sweet and mellifluous manner, and therefore he was by his hearers usually termed the Sweet Dropper, ‘sweet and heavenly distillations usually dropping from him with such a native eloquence as is not easily to be imitated.’  This commentary on Hosea is a fair specimen of his style.” – Spurgeon

Reynolds, Edward – An Explication of the Fourteenth Chapter of Hosea; in Seven Sermons  d. 1676

Reynolds was a Westminster divine and reformed Anglican.

*** – “Reynolds was on of the greatest theological writers in an age of great divines.  He worthily takes place with Burroughs.” – Spurgeon

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Joel

Topsell, Edward – Times Lamentation: or An Exposition on the Prophet Joel, in sundry sermons or meditations  1599

*** “Among the old English commentaries Topsell is the writer on Joel.  He has the usual force, homeliness, piety, and fullness of the Puritan period.” – Spurgeon

Pococke, Edward – A Commentary on the Prophecy of Joel  d. 1691

Pococke (1604-1691) was a reformed Anglican and Arabic scholar.  The level of the work is intermediate to advanced.

** “Full of antique learning.  Holds a high place among the older comments, but will never again be popular.” – Spurgeon

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Chapters in Joel

Udall, John – The True Remedy Against Famine and Wars, Five Sermons upon the First chapter of the Prophesy of Joel  1586

** “We gave so high a price for this small black letter volume that we should like to make it profitable to our brethren, and therefore we commend to the more starchy of them the following extract, which will also serve to show how the old preachers lashed with vigor the fashions of the times.  Udall says:

‘For the feeding of our monstrous humor of vanity, how many thousands of quarters of the finest wheat, which God ordained for the food of man, are yearly converted into that most devilish device of starch.  A sin so abominable that it doth cry so loudly in the Lord’s ears for vengeance, as his justice must needs proceed against us for it, without speedy repentance.'” – Spurgeon

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Amos

Benefield, Sebastian, on chs. 1-3

A Commentary or Exposition upon the First Chapter of the Prophecy of Amos Delivered in 21 Sermons  ToC  1613
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A Commentary or Exposition upon the Third Chapter of the Prophecy of Amos Delivered in 17 Sermons  ToC  1628
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** “Dr. Benefield was Lady Margaret Professor in Oxford, a Puritan and thorough Calvinist.  His volume was, in its time, the standard Commentary on Amos.  It is somewhat prolix and plentifully sprinkled with Latin; it only discusses three chapters in 953 pages.” – Spurgeon
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See Hall below for the rest of Amos.
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Hall, Thomas – An Exposition by Way of Supplement, on Amos chs. 4-9  EEBO  1661

** “Hall took up Amos where Benefield left off.   He says he studied brevity, and perhaps he succeeded, for he does not quite fill 600 pages with six chapters.  The two quartos make up a complete work, of an antique type, not suitable to modern tastes, nor up to the mark of present criticism, but still instructive.  What Puritan is not?” – Spurgeon

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Obadiah

1500’s

Pilkington, James – On the Prophet Obadiah  †1576  74 pp.

Pilkington was a reformed bishop in the Church of England.

** “Full of the minor as well as the major controversies of the Reformation period, and therefore the less interesting to us.  In its own day it was *the* master-work on the two prophets, Haggai and Obadiah.” – Spurgeon

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1600’s

Rainolds, John – The Prophecy of Obadiah Opened and Applied, in sundry Sermons  d. 1607  38 pp.

Rainolds (1549–1607) was an English puritan.

** “Full of classical stories and learned allusions; but more useful when first written than now.  The author was one of the most learned men the world ever produced, but he is not likely to be a favorite with modern readers.” – Spurgeon

Marbury, Edward – A Commentary or Exposition upon the prophecy of Obadiah  d. 1655

Marbury (1581-1655) was a reformed puritan.

*** “Far more lively than Rainolds.  His spirituality of mind prevents his learning becoming dull.  He says in the preface, ‘all my desire is to do all the good I can,’ and he writes in that spirit.” – Spurgeon

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Jonah

1500’s

Luther, Martin – Works, vol. 19: Minor Prophets II: Jonah and Habakkuk  Buy

Tyndale, William – The Prophet Jonah with an Introduction Before Teaching to Understand Him and the right use also of all the Scripture, etc.  1531

Hooper, John – An Overview and Deliberation upon Jonah: made and uttered before the king’s majesty, in Seven Sermons  1550

Hooper (ca. 1495-1500–1555) was one of the English reformers and martyrs who got burnt at the stake under Bloody Mary.

* “It would not repay the student to buy Hooper’s works for this short piece.  The language is antique, and the thought not of the newest.” – Spurgeon

King, John – Lectures on Jonah  1559

** “Quaint and rich, with a little occasional quiet mirth.  It was *the* book of its time.  Some will think it out of date, others will, like Grosart, prize the work of ‘the Bishop with the royal name.'” – Spurgeon

Calvin, John – The Lectures or Daily Sermons… upon the Prophet Jonas  1578

*** “This of course is fuller than the Commentary, and, as the work of a reverend master, is beyond our criticism.” – Spurgeon

Smith, Henry – Jonah, the Messenger of Ninevah’s Repentance, Set forth in his Calling, Rebellion, and Punishment  d. 1591

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1600’s

Abbott, George – An Exposition upon the Prophet Jonah contained in certain sermons  1600

Abbott (1562-1633) was a reformed Anglican.

*** “Abbott was a renowned Calvinist divine, and one of the translators of the present version of the Bible.  No set of works on Jonah would be complete without this learned, laborious, and comprehensive exposition.  It is, of course, very antique in style; but, like ‘old wine’, it is none the worse for its age.” – Spurgeon

Fuller, Thomas – Notes upon Jonah  d. 1661

Fuller was a reformed Anglican.

*** “Full of wisdom, and fuller of wit; in fact, too full of the soul of the latter, for they are far too short.” – Spurgeon

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Micah

1500’s

Gilby, Anthony – A Commentary upon the Prophet Mica  ToC  1551

Gilby (c.1510-1585) was a reformed puritan.

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1600’s

Pococke, Edward – A Commentary on the Prophecy of Micah  d. 1691

Pococke (1604-1691) was a reformed Anglican and an Arabic scholar.

** “Full of antique learning.  Holds a high place among the older comments, but will never again be popular.” – Spurgeon

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Nahum

None

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Habakkuk

1500’s

Luther, Martin – Works, vol. 19: Minor Prophets II: Jonah and Habakkuk  Buy

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1600’s

Marbury, Edward – A Commentary or Exposition upon the prophecy of Habakkuk  d. 1655

Marbury (1581-1655) was a reformed puritan.

*** “Here Marbury holds the field alone among old English authors, and he does so worthily.  There is about him a vigorous, earnest freshness which makes his pages glow.” – Spurgeon

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Habakkuk 3

Wycliff, John – ‘The Prayer of Habakkuk’  in Select English Works of John Wycliff, vol. 3, part 1, p. 24-32

Wycliff (1320–1384) was an English Bible translator and proto-reformer.

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Zephaniah

None

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Zephaniah 2

Perkins, William – A Faithful and Plain Exposition upon Zephaniah 2, containing a powerful exhortation to repentance, as also the manner how men in repentance are to search themselves  d. 1602

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Haggai

1500’s

Pilkington, James –  Commentary on Haggai  1562

Pilkington was one of the English reformers.

** “Full of the minor as well as the major controversies of the Reformation period, and therefore the less interesting to us.  In its own day it was *the* master-work on the two prophets, Haggai and Obadiah.” – Spurgeon

Grynaeus, John – Haggeus the Prophet, whereunto is added a most plentiful commentary gathered out of the public lectures of Dr. John James Gryneus  1586

Grynaeus (1540–1617) was a reformed professor at Basel, Switzerland and Heidelberg, Germany.

* “Grynaeus was a voluminous author, and commented on most of the books of Scripture, but only this work has been turned into English, and it is now seldom met with.” – Spurgeon 

[Note that Spurgeon’s rating system is based on books he recommends to purchase; hence he often gave hard to find books a low rating, though he may not have been familiar with it.]

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1600’s

Rainolds, Edward – An Exposition upon Haggai  d. 1607 

Rainolds was a puritan, to be distinguished from Edward Reynolds (†1676).

** “Rainolds was the tutor of Hooker, and had a main hand in our authorized version of the Bible.  Bishop Hall says, ‘the memory, the reading of that man were near a miracle.’  We ought to be enraptured with a commentary from such a divine, but we confess that we are not.” – Spurgeon

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Zechariah

Reformer

Luther, Martin – Works, vol. 20: Minor Prophets III: Zechariah  Buy

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Puritan

Pemble, William – A Short and Sweet Exposition of the First Nine Chapters of Zechariah in Works, pp. 389-471  †1623  

Pemble was a Reformed puritan.

** “Richard Capel [a reformed divine, †1656] says:

‘Amongst the hardest books of Scripture the prophets may have a place, and amongst the prophets, Zechary is a deep, wherein an elephant may swim, and therefore I cannot but commend the wisdom of that man of God (the author of this book), who bestowed his learning and his pains to open the mysteries of this prophecy.  Death ended his days ere he could quite finish his work, and great weakness hindered an in intended supplement.’

Pemble was a learned Calvinistic divine, and his writings are highly esteemed, but not very captivating.” – Spurgeon

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A Jewish Commentary on Zechariah

Kimchi, David – Commentary on the Prophecies of Zechariah, with notes and observations on the passages relating to the Messiah

Kimchi (1160-1235)

** “This enables the English reader to see how the Jews themselves understood the prophets, and this is worth knowing.” – Spurgeon

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Malachi

1500’s

Luther, Martin – Works, vol. 18: Minor Prophets I: Hosea & Malachi  Buy

Gilby, Anthony – A Commentary upon the Prophet Malachi  ToC  1553

Gilby (c.1510–1585) was a reformed, English puritan and translator of the Geneva Bible.

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1600’s

Stock, Richard – A Commentary upon the Prophecy of Malachi  †1626

Stock was a reformed puritan.

** “Contains a stock of knowledge, and more than a sufficient stock of quotations from the fathers.  Torshell printed the book fifteen years after Stock’s death, and finding it to be written for a popular audience only, he added an examination of the original and a few notes in a more learned style, to make a complete commentary.  The two authors have thus composed *the* work upon Malachi.” – Spurgeon

Sclater I, William –A Brief and Plain Commentary, with Notes upon the Whole Prophecy of Malachy  1650  †1626  published by his son of the same name.

** “Not equal to the general standard of puritan comments.  The editor of the work rightly says, ‘the method is, for the chapters themselves, analytical; for the practical observations, synthetical.’  We are quaintly told that he would start the hare [rabbit] with any man; that is to say, he would suggest thought and leave others to pursue its track.” – Spurgeon

Torshell, Samuel – An Exercitation upon the Prophecy of Malachi  d. 1650

Torshell (1605-1650) was reformed.  

** – Spurgeon, for his comments see above on Stock.

Pococke, Edward – A Commentary on the Prophecy of Malachi  d. 1691

Pococke (1604-1691) was a reformed Anglican and an Arabic scholar.

** “Full of antique learning.  Holds a high place among the older comments, but will never again be popular.” – Spurgeon

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Malachi 3:16-18

Watson, Thomas – Religion our True Interest, or, Practical Notes upon Mal. 3:16-18  Buy

** “This would be a great find if we could only come at it, for Watson is one of the clearest and liveliest of puritan authors.  We fear we shall never see this commentary, for we have tried to obtain it, and tried in vain.” – Spurgeon


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On the Whole New Testament

1500’s

Erasmus, Desiderius – Paraphrase on the New Testament, vols. 1 (Mt-Acts), 2 (Rom-Rev)  d. 1536  

Erasmus was the Roman Catholic humanist Bible scholar that argued for free-will against Martin Luther.  While a bit off on his doctrine of salvation, his writings, which exude his piety, are very much worth reading.  Erasmus was one of the preeminent Bible scholars of his day and compiled the Greek text that underlies the KJV Bible.

**  ‘This paraphrase was appointed by public authority to be placed in all churches in England, and the clergy were also ordered to read it.  The volumes are very rare, and expensive because of their rarity.’ – Spurgeon

Beza, Theodore – The New Testament of our Lord Jesus Christ, translated out of Greek by Beza, with brief summaries and expositions upon the hard places  1599

The margin notes are very brief and sometimes sparse; hence the reason for this not being rated higher.

***  ‘The compact marginal notes are still most useful.  The possessor of this old black letter Testament may think himself happy.’ – Spurgeon

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1600’s

Boys, John – Exposition of the Dominical [Lordly] Epistles and Gospels used in our English Liturgy throughout the Whole Year  Buy  1638

Boys is rich, deep and profound, but it has been categorized in this section as the work does not have a table of contents, so it is not very easy to use unless one is very familiar with the yearly Anglican liturgy.  Great for daily (or weekly) devotional reading.

***  ‘Racy, rich, and running over.  We marvel that it has not been reprinted [in Spurgeon’s day].  English churchmen ought not to leave such a book in its present scarcity, for it is specially adapted for their use.  Boys is all essence [substance].  What a difference between the John Boys of 1638 and the Thomas Boys [also an Anglican] of 1827 [when he published, ‘A Plain Exposition of the New Testament’]!  Note well the name.’ – Spurgeon 

Leigh, Edward – Annotations upon All the New Testament, Philological and Theological  1650 

A major reformed commentary from the mid-1600’s.  

***  ‘Good, brief notes.  Antique, but still prized.’ – Spurgeon

Hammond, Henry – A Paraphrase and Annotations upon all the Books of the New Testament, briefly explaining all the difficult places thereof, vols. 1 (Mt- Acts), 2 (Rom-Rev), 3 (Mt-Acts), 4 (Rom-Rev)  1659  Vols. 1-2 are the paraphrase of the N.T., vols. 3-4 are the annotations, or commentary on the N.T.  †1660

Hammond was an Arminian Anglican, though Matthew Henry found him profitable enough to refer to him 96 times in his commentary.

**  ‘Though Hammond gives a great deal of dry criticism, and is Arminian, churchy, and peculiar, we greatly value his addition to our stores of biblical information.  Use the sieve and reject the chaff.’ – Spurgeon

Baxter, Richard – A Paraphrase on the New Testament with Notes, Doctrinal and Practical, by plainness and brevity fitted to the use of religious families in their daily reading of the Scriptures and of the younger and poorer sort of scholars and ministers, who want fuller helps, with an advertisement of difficulties in the Revelations  1685

Baxter had a number of errors on Justification, universal atonement, covenant theology, etc., but by and large he is helpful and was regarded as a puritan. 

**  ‘The notes are in Baxter’s intensely practical and personal style, and show the hortatory use of Scripture; but they are not very explanatory.’ – Spurgeon


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The Life of Christ

Hall, Joseph – Contemplations on the Historical Parts of the New Testament  d. 1656  The work only covers the life of Christ (not the whole N.T.).

Hall was an influential reformed Anglican bishop.  These devotional and practical contemplations savor of deep spirituality and are very insightful.  One of a kind and one of the best.

***  ‘Need I commend Bishop Hall’s Contemplations to your affectionate attention?  What wit!  What sound sense!  What concealed learning!  His style is as pithy and witty as that of Thomas Fuller, and it has a sacred unction about it to which Fuller has no pretension.’  ‘The work can be readily procured; but if its price were raised in proportion to its real value, it would become one of the most costly books extant.’ – Spurgeon

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Various Parts of the Life of Christ

The Baptism of Christ

Cowper, William – Of Christ’s Baptism  1612  60 pp.

Cowper was a Scottish Bishop.

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The Temptation of Christ

1500’s

Knox, John – An Exposition of Matt 4:1-4, Concerning the Temptation of Christ in the Wilderness  1556  29 pp., in Works  Buy  vol. 4, pp. 85-114

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1600’s

Perkins, William – The Combat Between Christ and the Devil Displayed: or a Commentary upon the Temptations of Christ  d. 1602

Cowper, William – A Treatise of Christ’s Temptation  1612  147 pp.

Cowper was a Scottish bishop.

Dyke, Daniel – Two Treatises: The One of Repentance, the Other of Christ’s Temptations  d. 1614

Fuller, Thomas – A Commentary on Matt 4:1-11 concerning Christ’s Temptations, Delivered in 12 Sermons  1652

Fuller (1607-1661) was a reformed Anglican.

White, Thomas – The Sum of Practical Divinity practiced in the wilderness and delivered by our Savior in his Sermon on the Mount, being observations upon the fourth, fifth, sixth, and seventh chapters of St. Matthew  ToC  1653

Nevay, John – 32 Sermons on Christ’s Temptation  †1672

Manton, Thomas – The Temptation of Christ in 7 Sermons  †1677  76 pp.  in Works, vol. 1, p. 259 ff.  †1677

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The Beatitudes

Babington, Gervase – A Brief Conference Betwixt Man’s Frailty and Faith wherein is declared the true use, and comfort of those blessings pronounced by Christ in the Fifth of Matthew, that every Christian man and woman ought to make and take hold of in their several tentations and conflicts: laid down in this plain order of dialogue  1584

Burroughs, Jeremiah – The Saints’ Happiness. Together with the several steps leading thereunto, delivered in divers Lectures on the Beatitudes; Being part of Christ’s Sermon in the Mount; contained in the fifth of Mathew  Buy  1660

Watson, Thomas – The Beatitudes: Or, a Discourse Upon Part of Christ’s Famous Sermon on the Mount  1671

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The Sermon on the Mount

1500’s

Luther, Martin – Works, vol. 21: The Sermon on the Mount and the Magnificat  Buy

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1600’s

Perkins, William  d. 1602

A Godly and Learned Exposition of Christ’s Sermon in the Mount [Matt 5-7]

The Reformation of Covetousness written upon Matt 6:19 to the end of the Chapter

White, Thomas – The Sum of Practical Divinity Practiced in the Wilderness and Delivered by our Savior in his Sermon on the Mount, being Observations upon the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Seventh chapters of St. Matthew  ToC  1653

Horneck, Anthony – Several Sermons upon the 5th of Matthew, being part of Christ’s Sermon on the Mount, vols. 1, 2  d. 1697

Horneck was a reformed Anglican. 

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Expositions of the Lord’s Prayer, Mt. 6

This page covers all of Church history, but see the numerous works under the sections on the 1500’s & 1600’s.

Expositions of the Lord’s Prayer  63+

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The Parables

Keach, Benjamin – An Exposition of the Parables  †1704

Keach (1640-1704) was a Calvinistic Baptist who ministered in the church that Spurgeon would later pastor.

**  “Although our honored predecessor makes metaphors run on as many legs as a centipede, he has been useful to thousands.  His work is old-fashioned, but it is not to be sneered at.” – Spurgeon

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The Prodigal Son

Cowper, William – A Mirror of Mercy or The Prodigal’s Conversion Briefly, and Learnedly Expounded, and full of comfortable consolations for all penitent sinners  1615  272 pp.

Cowper (1568–1619) was a Scottish bishop.

Rutherford, Samuel – On Luke 15:11-32, The Forlorn Son, Sermons 9-15  Buy  †1661  125 pp.

Sedgwick, Obadiah – The Parable of the Prodigal, containing The Riotous Prodigal, or, The Sinner’s Aversion from God; Returning Prodigal, or, The Penitent’s Conversion to God; Prodigal’s Acception, or, Favorable entertainment with God  1660  380 pp.

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The Transfiguration

Manton, Thomas – The Transfiguration of Christ in 7 sermons  77 pp.  in Works, vol. 1, p. 337 ff.

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The Passion to the Ascension

Coverdale, Miles – Fruitful Lessons upon the Passion, Burial, Resurrection, Ascension, and of the Sending of the Holy Ghost, gathered out of the Four Evangelists, with a plain exposition of the same  d. 1568

Rollock, Robert

25 Sermons upon the Last Sermon and Conference of our Lord Jesus Christ with his disciples immediately before his Passion, Contained in the 14th, 15th, and 16th Chapters of the Gospel of St. John, as also upon that most excellent prayer, contained in the 17th Chapter  d. 1599

Lectures on the Passion, Resurrection and Ascension of our Lord Jesus Christ from John 18-21, containing a perfect harmony of all the four Evangelists for the better understanding of all the circumstances of the Lord’s death and Resurrection  d. 1599

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All Four Gospels

Hall, Joseph – Contemplations on the Historical Parts of the New Testament  d. 1656

Hall (1574–1656) was an influential reformed Anglican bishop.  These devotional and practical contemplations savor of deep spirituality and are very insightful.  One of a kind and one of the best.

***  ‘Need I commend Bishop Hall’s Contemplations to your affectionate attention?  What wit!  What sound sense!  What concealed learning!  His style is as pithy and witty as that of Thomas Fuller, and it has a sacred unction about it to which Fuller has no pretension.’  ‘The work can be readily procured; but if its price were raised in proportion to its real value, it would become one of the most costly books extant.’ – Spurgeon

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Matthew

1500’s

Marlorat, Augustine – A Catholic and Ecclesiastical Exposition of the Holy Gospel after St. Mathew, gathered out of all the singular and approved divines (which the Lord has given to his Church)  ToC  1570

Marlorat (1506-1562) was reformed.  His commentaries are particularly valuable as they are compendiums of block quotes from some of the best reformed divines of his day on the passages of that particular Biblical book.  See here for an excerpt from his commentary on John. 

**“Marlorate was an eminent French reformer, preacher and martyr.  His commentaries contain the cream of the older writers, and are in much esteem, but are very rare.  He wrote on the whole New Testament, but we have in English only the Gospels [2-3 John] and Jude [and Revelation 1 & 13].” – Spurgeon

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1600’s

Ward, Richard – Theological questions, dogmatic observations, and evangelical essays upon the Gospel St. Matthew, wherein about two thousand six hundred and fifty necessary and profitable questions are discussed; and five hundred and eighty special points of doctrine noted; and five hundred and fifty errors confuted, or objections answered: together with diverse arguments, whereby divers truths, and true tenets are confirmed  ToC  1640

Ward (1601-1684) was educated at Cambridge, England and St. Andrews, Scotland, and was a reformed minister in London.

**  “A huge mass of comment, in which are thousands of good things mostly set forth by way of question and answer.  Few could ever read it through; but to a wise minister it would be a mine of wealth.” – Spurgeon

Dickson, David – Matthew  Buy  1651  394 pp.

Dickson (c.1583–1663) was a Scottish covenanter.  This has been reprinted by Banner of Truth in their Geneva Commentary Series.

*** – ‘A perfect gem.  The work is, to men of our school, more suggestive of sermons than almost any other we have met with.’ – Spurgeon

Lightfoot, John – A Commentary on Matthew from the Talmud and Hebraica  mid-1600’s

Lightfoot was a reformed divine and Hebraicist who was invited to the Westminster Assembly.  He mined the Jewish writings for anything and everything that may be of help in understanding the New Testament.  Here are his results.  

This is the only work of its kind in English; the scholarly, more complete work (vol. 1, Mt; vol. 2, Mk-Jn) that has improved, in some ways, upon Lightfoot, done in the early 1900’s by H. Strack and P. Billerbeck, has still not been translated out of the German.  

If one is interested in seeing the results of the use of the Jewish writings in relation to the gospel accounts, see Edersheim’s Life and Times of Jesus the Messiah, who thoroughly makes use of them from his encyclopedic knowledge of the Jewish writings from his orthodox Jewish upbringing his life’s work as a scholar. 

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Chapters in Matthew

Also see above on Various Parts of the Life of Christ.

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Leighton, Robert – Lectures on Matt 1-9  †1684  84 pp.

Leighton was a godly Scottish bishop whose writings are very spiritual and savory.

Blackwood, Christopher – Expositions and Sermons upon the Ten First Chapters of the Gospel of Jesus Christ, according to Matthew   ToC  1659

**  “This learned divine became a Baptist through studying the arguments against believers’ baptism.  This proves his candor.  His comment is somewhat out of date, but it is still good.” – Spurgeon

Burroughs, Jeremiah – Christ Inviting Sinners to come to Him for Rest; Four Books on the Eleventh of Matthew   1659

Burroughs was an English puritan.

Cameron, Richard – Lecture on Mt. 18:1-17  †1680  9 pp., from Sermons in Times of Persecution  Buy

Cameron was a Scottish covenanter, from where the name ‘Cameronians’ comes from.  He is to be distinguished from John Cameron who lived earlier in the century.

Shepherd, Thomas – The Parable of the Ten Virgins Opened and Applied, being the substance of diverse sermons on Mt. 25:1-13  GB

Manton, Thomas – 27 Sermons on Matt 25:30-46  d. 1677

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Mark

Marlorat, Augustin – A Catholic and Ecclesiastical Exposition of the Holy Gospel after St. Mark and Luke, gathered out of all the singular and approved divines, which the Lord has given to his church  ToC  1583

Marlorat (1506-1562) was reformed.  His commentaries are particularly valuable as they are compendiums of block quotes from some of the best reformed divines of his day on the passages of that particular Biblical book.  See here for an excerpt from his commentary on John. 

On his commentary on Matthew:  ** – “Marlorate was an eminent French reformer, preacher and martyr.  His commentaries contain the cream of the older writers, and are in much esteem, but are very rare.  He wrote on the whole New Testament, but we have in English only the Gospels [2-3 John] and Jude [and Revelation 1 & 13].” – Spurgeon

Lightfoot, John – A Commentary on Mark from the Talmud and Hebraica  mid-1600’s

Lightfoot was a reformed divine and Hebraicist who was invited to the Westminster Assembly.  He mined the Jewish writings for anything and everything that may be of help in understanding the New Testament.  Here are his results.  This is the only work of its kind in English; the scholarly, more complete work (vol. 1, Mt; vol. 2, Mk-Jn) that has improved, in some ways, upon Lightfoot, done in the early 1900’s by H. Strack and P. Billerbeck, has still not been translated out of the German.  

If one is interested in seeing the results of the use of the Jewish writings in relation to the gospel accounts, see Edersheim’s Life and Times of Jesus the Messiah, who thoroughly makes use of them from his encyclopedic knowledge of the Jewish writings from his orthodox Jewish upbringing his life’s work as a scholar. 

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Chapters in Mark

See also above on the Various Parts of the Life of Christ.

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Petter, George – A Learned, Pious, and Practical Commentary, upon the Gospel According to St. Mark, chs. 1-11  ToC  1661

**  “Mr. J.C. Ryle says of this work: ‘For laborious investigation of the meaning of every word, for patient discussion of every question bearing on the text, for fullness of matter, for real thoughtfulness, and for continued practical application, there is no work on St. Mark which, in my opinion, bears comparison with Petter’s.  Like Goliath’s sword, there is nothing like it.’  We have found far less fresh thought in it than we expected, and think it rather tedious reading.” – Spurgeon

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Luke

Marlorat, Augustin – A Catholic and Ecclesiastical Exposition of the Holy Gospel after St. Mark and Luke, gathered out of all the singular and approved divines, which the Lord has given to his church  ToC  1583

Marlorat (1506-1562) was reformed.  His commentaries are particularly valuable as they are compendiums of block quotes from some of the best reformed divines of his day on the passages of that particular Biblical book.  See here for an excerpt from his commentary on John. 

On his commentary on Matthew: ** – “Marlorate was an eminent French reformer, preacher and martyr.  His commentaries contain the cream of the older writers, and are in much esteem, but are very rare.  He wrote on the whole New Testament, but we have in English only the Gospels [2-3 John] and Jude [and Revelation 1 & 13].” – Spurgeon

Lightfoot, John – A Commentary on Luke from the Talmud and Hebraica

Lightfoot was a mid-1600’s reformed divine who was invited to the Westminster Assembly.  He mined the Jewish writings for anything and everything that may be of help in understanding the New Testament.  Here are his results.  This is the only work of its kind in English; the scholarly, more complete work (vol. 1, Mt; vol. 2, Mk-Jn) that has improved, in some ways, upon Lightfoot, done in the early 1900’s by H. Strack and P. Billerbeck, has still not been translated out of the German.  

If one is interested in seeing the results of the use of the Jewish writings in relation to the gospel accounts, see Edersheim’s Life and Times of Jesus the Messiah, who thoroughly makes use of them from his encyclopedic knowledge of the Jewish writings from his orthodox Jewish upbringing his life’s work as a scholar. 

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Luke 1

Wycliff, John – ‘The Magnificat’  in Select English Works of John Wycliff, vol. 3, part 1, p. 48-52  †1384

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Lk. 15, The Prodigal Son

See also our pages on The Parables and on the significant strand of historic, reformed Christianity that has taught that God is a Father to All People by Creation.

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1600’s

Cowper, William – A Mirror of Mercy or The Prodigal’s Conversion Briefly, and Learnedly Expounded, and full of comfortable consolations for all penitent sinners  1615  272 pp.

Cowper (1568–1619) was a Scottish bishop.

Rutherford, Samuel – On Luke 15:11-32, The Forlorn Son, Sermons 9-15  Buy  †1661  125 pp.

Sedgwick, Obadiah – The Parable of the Prodigal, containing The Riotous Prodigal, or, The Sinner’s Aversion from God; Returning Prodigal, or, The Penitent’s Conversion to God; Prodigal’s Acception, or, Favorable entertainment with God  1660  380 pp.

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John

Traheron, Bartholomew – An Exposition of a Part of St. John’s Gospel made in sundry readings in the English congregation… and now published against the wicked enterprises of new stirred up Arians in England  ToC  d. 1558

**  “A little quaint old book.  Not intrinsically worth the price, nor a tenth of it.” – Spurgeon

Marlorat, Augustin – A Catholic and Ecclesiastical Exposition of the Holy Gospel after St. John, gathered out of all the singular and approved divines (which the Lord has given unto his Church)  ToC  1575

Marlorat (1506-1562) was reformed.  His commentaries are particularly valuable as they are compendiums of block quotes from some of the best reformed divines of his day on the passages of that particular Biblical book.  See here for an excerpt from this work. 

On his commentary on Matthew: ** – “Marlorate was an eminent French reformer, preacher and martyr.  His commentaries contain the cream of the older writers, and are in much esteem, but are very rare.  He wrote on the whole New Testament, but we have in English only the Gospels [2-3 John] and Jude [and Revelation 1 & 13].” – Spurgeon

Lightfoot, John – Commentary on John from the Talmud and Hebraica

Lightfoot was a mid-1600’s reformed divine who was invited to the Westminster Assembly.  He mined the Jewish writings for anything and everything that may be of help in understanding the New Testament.  Here are his results.  This is the only work of its kind in English; the scholarly, more complete work (vol. 1, Mt; vol. 2, Mk-Jn) that has improved, in some ways, upon Lightfoot, done in the early 1900’s by H. Strack and P. Billerbeck, has still not been translated out of the German.  

If one is interested in seeing the results of the use of the Jewish writings in relation to the gospel accounts, see Edersheim’s Life and Times of Jesus the Messiah, who thoroughly makes use of them from his encyclopedic knowledge of the Jewish writings from his orthodox Jewish upbringing his life’s work as a scholar.

Hutcheson, George – An Exposition of John  Buy  1657

*** – ‘Excellent; beyond all praise.  It is a full-stored treasury of sound theology, holy thought, and marrowy doctrine.’ – Spurgeon

“Vast in scope, rich in background information, and warm in devotional emphasis. May well be described as a pastor’s commentary on this Gospel.” – Cyril J. Barber

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Chapters in John

Luther, Martin 

Works  Buy

Vol. 22: Sermons on the Gospel of St. John – Chapters 1-4
Vol. 23: Sermons on the Gospel of St. John – Chapters 6-8
Vol. 24: Sermons on the Gospel of St. John – Chapters 14-16

Arrowsmith, John – Theanthrōpos, or, God-Man: being an exposition upon the first eighteen verses of the first chapter of the Gospel according to St. John. Wherein, is most accurately and divinely handled, the divinity and humanity of Jesus Christ; proving Him to be God and man, co-equal and co-eternal with the Father: to the confutation of several heresies both ancient and modern  ToC  1660

Hildersham, Arthur – 108 Lectures upon John 4  1632

***  “A mass of godly teaching; but rather heavy reading.”

Gouge, William – An Exposition on the whole Fifth Chapter of John’s Gospel, also notes on other choice places of Scripture  1630, the other notes of scripture exposited are: John 3:29-34; Mark 1:25-2:14; Luke 3:19-20; James 4:7; Gen. 2:9,23; Ex. 12:8,11,14-16; Ps. 30:2; Eph. 5:22-33; 6:4-15

Brenz, Johannes – A Very Fruitful Exposition upon the Sixth Chapter of St. John divided into 10 Homilies, or Sermons  1550

Clagett, William – A Paraphrase with Notes, and a Preface upon the Sixth Chapter of St. John: showing that there is neither good reason, nor sufficient authority, to suppose that the Eucharist is discoursed of in that chapter, much less to infer the doctrine of transubstantiation from it  d. 1688

Clagett (1646-1688) was an Anglican.

Rollock, Robert

25 Sermons upon the Last Sermon and Conference of our Lord Jesus Christ with his Disciples Immediately before his Passion, contained in the 14th, 15th, and 16th chapters of the Gospel of St. John, as also upon that most excellent prayer, contained in the 17th Chapter  d. 1599

Lectures on the Passion, Resurrection and Ascension of our Lord Jesus Christ from John 18-21, containing a perfect harmony of all the four Evangelists for the better understanding of all the circumstances of the Lord’s death and Resurrection  d. 1599

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John 17

Rollock, Robert – 25 Sermons upon the Last Sermon and Conference of our Lord Jesus Christ with his Disciples Immediately before his Passion, contained in the 14th, 15th, and 16th chapters of the Gospel of St. John, as also upon that most excellent prayer, contained in the 17th Chapter  d. 1599

Willet, Andrew – The Treasure of the Church consisting of the Perpetual Intercession and most holy prayer of Christ, set forth in John 17, which in this treatise is plainly interpreted, with necessary doctrines enlarged and fit applications enforced  1604

Willet (1562–1621)

Burgess, Anthony – 145 Expository Sermons upon John 17, or, Christ’s Prayer Before his Passion Explicated, and Both Practically and Polemically Improved  1656

***  “A Standard work by a great Puritan.  Somewhat prolix.” – Spurgeon

Manton, Thomas – 45 Sermons on John 17  d. 1677

“A deep, rich and full exposition by a Puritan divine.” – Cyril J. Barber

Newton, George – John 17  ToC  Buy

Newton (1602–1681)

***  “If not one of the chief of the Puritans, Newton was but little behind the front rank in ability.  Joseph Alleine was his assistant minister at Taunton.  His writings are plain and profitable.” – Spurgeon

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Acts

1500’s

Gwalther, Rudolph – A 175 Homilies or Sermons upon Acts  1572

Gwalther was reformed and was the successor to Heinrich Bullinger in Zurich, Switzerland.

**  “Full of Protestantism.  The author judged that, as Luke who wrote the Acts, was a physician, his book was meant to be medicine to the Church.” – Spurgeon

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1600s

Lightfoot, John – Hebrew and Talmudical Exercitations upon the Acts of the Apostles  mid-1600’s

Lightfoot was a reformed divine and Hebraicist who was invited to the Westminster Assembly.  He mined the Jewish writings for anything and everything that may be of help in understanding the New Testament.  Here are his results. 

This is the only work of its kind in English; the scholarly, more complete work (vol. 1, Mt; vol. 2, Mk-Jn) that has improved, in some ways, upon Lightfoot, done in the early 1900’s by H. Strack and P. Billerbeck, has still not been translated out of the German.  

*  “Few now-a-days will care for this author, whose learning ran mostly in Talmudical channels.  He was profound, but not always discreet.” – Spurgeon

Du Veil, Charles-Marie – A Commentary on the Acts of the Apostles

Du Veil (1630-1685) was Reformed.

**  “Claude’s prefatory lettter highly commends this work.  The author defends the immersion of believers with earnestness.” – Spurgeon

“Reprinted from the first edition which appeared in 1685. Lengthy exposition by a man whose theological pilgrimage took him from Judaism to Roman Catholicism, to Anglicanism and finally to the Baptists. Supports all the cardinal doctrines of the faith. Argues for immersion.” – Cyril J. Barber

Pearson, John – Five Lectures on the Acts of the Apostles and Annals of St. Paul  The first half of the book covers Acts 2-9, the second half on the annals of St. Paul, covers much of the rest of the book.

Pearson (1613-1686) was an Anglican, known for his commentary on the Apostles’ Creed.

Cradock, Samuel – The Apostolical History, containing the Acts, Labors, Travels, Sermons, Discourses, Miracles, Successes and Sufferings of the Holy Apostles, from Christ’s Ascension, to the Destruction of Jerusalem, by Titus  d. 1706 

Cradock was a reformed puritan.

“Tillotson, Reynolds, Doddridge, and others highly commended the works of this Puritan writer.  The style in which the ‘Apostolical History’ is got up is most uninviting; the book is nearly all italics.  Many modern works far excel it.” – Spurgeon

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Chapters in Acts

Calvin, John – Sermons on the Acts of the Apostles: Chs. 1-7  Buy

Lightfoot, John – A Commentary on the Acts of the Apostles, chs. 1-12 in Works, vol. 8, pp. 1-295  Reformed

**  “Few now-a-days will care for this author, whose learning ran mostly in Talmudical channels.  He was profound, but not always discreet.” – Spurgeon

Tye, Christopher – The Acts of the Apostles [chs. 1-14], translated into English meter… for all Christians that cannot sing, to read the good and Godly stories of the lives of Christ’s Apostles  1553

 

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The Epistles

Dickson, David – An Exposition of all St. Paul’s Epistles together with an explanation of those other epistles of the apostles St. James, Peter, John & Jude, wherein the sense of every chapter and verse is analytically unfolded and the text enlightened  (Romans-Jude)  Buy  1659  

Dickson was a prominent Scottish covenanter.

*** – ‘Dickson is a writer after our own heart.  For preachers he is a great ally.  There is nothing brilliant or profound; but everything is clear and well arranged, and the unction runs down like the oil from Aaron’s head.  In this volume the observations are brief.’

Note that the Banner of Truth reprint contains Dickson’s commentary on less books than the original.

Fergusson, James – A Brief Exposition of Galatians, Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians and the Thessalonians  Buy  1656-74

Fergusson was a Scottish covenanter.

*** – ‘He who possesses this work is rich.  The author handles his matter in the same manner as Hutcheson and Dickson, and he is of their class–a grand, gracious, savory divine.’


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Romans

1500’s

Colet, John – An Exposition on Romans  d. 1519  rep. 1874  

Colet was a reforming, English, humanist, Roman Catholic priest who was critical of the Church and was a friend of Erasmus.

Luther, Martin – PrefaceCommentary on Romans

Luther’s Preface was historically foundational to the Reformation.  Luther is good, but he cannot be relied upon in every area of Romans. 

Specifically he does not affirm the 3rd Use of the Law (that the Law is a guide to the Christian’s path) and he interprets the motif of the flesh vs. the spirit as the sinful inclinations of a man’s body vs. his spirit, whereas the scriptural phraseology denotes by ‘flesh’ man’s sinful body and soul together and by ‘spirit’, the influence of the Holy Spirit. 

For the latter interpretation, why it is correct, and the flow of thought in the passages (Rom. 6-8 especially), see the commentary of John Calvin.

“This indispensable work contains lectures which were first delivered to his students in 1515-16, and shows the process through which Luther went as he grappled with the problems of Roman dogma versus justification by faith.” – Cyril J. Barber

Tyndale, William – A Compendious Introduction, Prologue or Preface unto the Epistle of Paul to the Romans  1526  45 pp.

Vermigli, Peter Martyr – A Most Learned and Fruitful Commentary upon the Epistle of St. Paul to the Romans wherein are diligently and most profitably entreated all such matters and chief common places of religion touched in the same Epistle  ToC  d. 1562

**  “Being in black letter, and very long, few will ever read it; but it contains much that will repay the laborious book-worm.” – Spurgeon

Corro, Antonio – A Theological Dialogue, wherein the Epistle of St. Paul the Apostle to the Romans is expounded  ToC  1575

Corro (1527-1591) was a reformed professor of divinity.

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1600’s

Wilson, Thomas – A Commentary on Romans  1614

Wilson (1563-1622) was a reformed Anglican. 

**  “Intended for the less-instructed among the preacher’s hearers, and put into the form of a dialogue.  It is very solid, but does not contain much which is very striking or original.” – Spurgeon

Ferme, Charles – A Logical Analysis of Romans  PoD  †1617  

Ferme (1565-1617) was a reformed Scottish divine.

Willet, Andrew – A Six-fold Commentary upon Romans  1620

Willet (1562–1621)

**‘This work is called by its author [1562-1621] a Hexapla, because he treats his subject under six heads, giving ‘a sixfold use of every chapter, showing:

1. The method of argument;
2. The diverse readings;
3. The explanation of difficult questions and doubtful places;  
4. The places of doctrine;  
5. Places of confutation;  
6. Moral observations.’

Willet is tedious reading; his method hampers him.  In all his Commentaries he lumbers along in his six-wheeled wagon.’ – Spurgeon

Day, William – A Paraphrase and Commentary upon the Epistle of St. Paul to the Romans  ToC  1666

Day (d. 1684) was an Anglican.

Brown, John, of Wamphray – An Exposition of Romans with Large Practical Observations, Delivered in Several Lectures  Buy  †1679

Brown (1610-1679) was a late Scottish covenanter, exiled in Holland.

** – ‘By a Calvinist of the old school.  Heavy, perhaps; but precious.’ – Spurgeon

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Chapters in Romans

Sclater, William

A Key to the Key of Scripture, or an Exposition with Notes upon the Romans chs. 1-3  ToC  d. 1626

Sclater (1575-1626) was a reformed puritan.

***  “An antique, but precious book.” – Spurgeon

An Exposition with Notes, on the Whole Fourth Chapter to the Romans. Wherein the Grand Question of Justification by Faith Alone Without Works, is Controverted Stated, Cleared, and Fully Resolved

Lightfoot, John – Hebrew and Talmudical Exercitations upon Some Few Chapters of the Epistle to the Romans  on chs. 3, 8, 11

Lightfoot was a mid-1600’s reformed divine who was invited to the Westminster Assembly.  He mined the Jewish writings for anything and everything that may be of help in understanding the New Testament.  Here are his results.  This is the only work of its kind in English.

Parr, Elnathan – A Short View of the Epistle to the Romans 1-2:2, also in The Works  Buy  4th ed. 1651

Parr (1577-1622) was reformed.

***  “The style is faulty, but the matter is rich and full of suggestions.  We regret that the work is not complete, and is seldom to be met with except in fragments.” – Spurgeon

Manton, Thomas – 24 Sermons on Romans 6  d. 1677

Elton, Edward – The Complaint of a Sanctified Sinner Answered: or An Explanation of the Seventh Chapter of the Epistle of Saint Paul to the Romans, delivered in diverse sermons  ToC  1618

Elton (1569-1624) was reformed.

***  “The style is plain and homely, but the matter is of the choicest kin.  This old folio is like an old skin bottle, with a rough exterior, but filled within with the product of the rarest vintage.  Such books as this we never tire of reading.” – Spurgeon

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Romans 8

The First Part of Romans 8

Jacomb, Thomas – Sermons on the 8th Chapter of the Epistle to the Romans, verses 1-4  d. 1687  This has been reprinted by Banner of Truth

Jacomb (1622–1687) was an English puritan.

Binning, Hugh – The Sinner’s Sanctuary, Forty sermons on Rom. 8:1-15  d. 1653

Binning (1627-1653) was a Scottish covenanter.

***  “The writer of Binning’s Memoir says: ‘There is a pure stream of piety and learning running through the whole, and a very peculiar turn of thought, which exceeds the common rate of writers on this choice part of the Holy Scriptures.'” – Spurgeon

Lightfoot, John – Hebrew and Talmudical Exercitations upon Some Few Chapters of the Epistle to the Romans  on Rom. 8:1-4

Lightfoot was a mid-1600’s reformed divine who was invited to the Westminster Assembly.  He mined the Jewish writings for anything and everything that may be of help in understanding the New Testament.  Here are his results.  This is the only work of its kind in English.

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The Whole of Romans 8

1500’s

Hedlambe, John – An Exposition of the Whole Eighth Chapter to the Romans, Wherein is perfectly proved our Justification to be by faith only, to the beating down and overthrowing of all erroneous and false opinions to the contrary  1579  48 pp.

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1600’s

Cowper, William, of Galloway – Three Heavenly Treatises upon Romans 8, wherein the counsel of God concerning man’s salvation is so manifested that all men may see the Ancient of Days, the Judge of the World, in his general justice court absolving the Christian from sin and death, which is the first benefit we have by our Lord Jesus Christ  1609  457 pp.

Cowper (1568–1619) was a reformed Scottish bishop.

Parr, Elnathan – A Plain Exposition upon the Whole 8, 9, 10, 11 chapters of the Epistle of Saint Paul to the Romans. Wherein the text is diligently and methodically resolved, the sense given: and many doctrines thence gathered, are by lively uses applied, for the benefit of God’s children performed with much variety, and convenient brevity: being the substance of near four years weekdays’ Sermons  1618

Parr (1577-1622) was reformed.

***  “The style is faulty, but the matter is rich and full of suggestions.  We regret that the work is not complete, and is seldom to be met with except in fragments.” – Spurgeon

Elton, Edward – The Triumph of a True Christian described: or An Explication of the Eighth Chapter of the Epistle of Saint Paul to the Romans, wherein the sanctified sinner’s heaven upon earth is laid open, with explication of the comfort of it to as many as are so qualified. delivered in sundry sermons  ToC  1623

Elton (1569-1624) was a reformed, English puritan.

Horton, Thomas – Forty Six Sermons upon the Whole Eighth Chapter of the Epistle of the apostle Paul to the Romans, lately preached  Buy  1674

Horton (d. 1673) was an English, reformed puritan.

***  “Full of matter, well, but rather too formally, arranged.  The sermons are very prim and orderly.” – Spurgeon

Manton, Thomas – 47 Sermons on Romans 8  383 pp.  d. 1677

Hamilton, Alexander – A Cordial for Christians Traveling Heavenward, being the Substance of some Sermons upon the Eighth chapter of Paul’s Epistle to the Romans  1696  232 pp.

Hamilton (d. 1696) was a Scot who preached these sermons in Edinburgh.

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Romans 9-16

Parr, Elnathan

A Plain Exposition upon the Whole 8, 9, 10, 11 chapters of the Epistle of Saint Paul to the Romans. Wherein the text is diligently and methodically resolved, the sense given: and many doctrines thence gathered, are by lively uses applied, for the benefit of God’s children performed with much variety, and convenient brevity: being the substance of near four years weekdays’ Sermons

A Plain Exposition upon the Whole Thirteenth, Fourteenth, Fifteenth, and Sixteenth Chapters of the Epistle of St. Paul to the Romans, wherein the text is diligently and methodically resolved, the sense given, and many doctrines thence gathered, are by lively uses applied for the benefit of God’s children. Performed with much variety, and convenient brevity  ToC  1622

Parr (1577-1622) was reformed.

***  “The style is faulty, but the matter is rich and full of suggestions.  We regret that the work is not complete, and is seldom to be met with except in fragments.” – Spurgeon

Elton, Edward – The Great Mystery of Godlinesse Opened being an Exposition upon the Whole Ninth Chapter of the Epistle of Saint Paul to the Romans  ToC  †1624

Elton (1569-1624) was reformed.

Draxe, Thomas –  The World’s Resurrection, or the General Calling of the Jews; A Familiar Commentary upon the Eleventh Chapter of St. Paul to the Romans, according to the sense of Scripture and the consent of the most judicious interpreters, wherein above fifty notable questions are soundly answered, and the particular doctrines, reasons and uses of every verse, are profitable and plainly delivered  1608

Draxe (d. 1608) was a reformed puritan.

Lightfoot, John – Hebrew and Talmudical Exercitations upon Some Few Chapters of the Epistle to the Romans  on chs. 3, 8, 11

Lightfoot was a mid-1600’s reformed divine who was invited to the Westminster Assembly.  He mined the Jewish writings for anything and everything that may be of help in understanding the New Testament.  Here are his results.  This is the only work of its kind in English.  

Leighton, Robert – An Expository Lecture on Rom. 12:3-12  1600’s

Hooper, John – Godly and Most Necessary Annotations on the 13th chapter to the Romans  1551

Parr, Elnathan –  A Plain Exposition upon the Whole thirteenth, fourteenth, fifteenth, and sixteenth chapters of the Epistle of St. Paul to the Romans, wherein the text is diligently and methodically resolved, the sense given, and many doctrines thence gathered, are by lively uses applied for the benefit of God’s children. Performed with much variety, and convenient brevity ToC  1622

Parr (1577-1622) was reformed.

***  “The style is faulty, but the matter is rich and full of suggestions.  We regret that the work is not complete, and is seldom to be met with except in fragments.” – Spurgeon

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1 Corinthians

Colet, John – An Exposition on 1 Corinthians  d. 1519  rep. 1874  

Colet was a reforming, English, humanist, Roman Catholic Priest who as critical of the Church and was a friend of Erasmus.

**  “A curiosity and nothing more.  This same ancient Dean Colet, the friend of Erasmus, wrote also on the Romans.” – Spurgeon

Lightfoot, John – Hebrew and Talmudical Exercitations upon 1 Corinthians, to which is added a discourse concerning what Bibles were used to be read in the religious assemblies of the Jews  See also the table of contents to the Addenda to 1 Cor. 14

Lightfoot was a mid-1600’s reformed divine who was invited to the Westminster Assembly.  He mined the Jewish writings for anything and everything that may be of help in understanding the New Testament.  Here are his results.  This is the only work of its kind in English.  

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Chapters in 1 Corinthians

1500’s

Erasmus, Desiderus – An Exhortation to the Diligent study of scripture: An Exposition of 1 Corinthians 7  1529

Luther, Martin – Works, vol. 28: 1 Corinthians 7, 1 Corinthians 15, Lectures on 1 Timothy  Buy

1600’s

Fuller, Thomas – Joseph’s Party-Colored Coat: a Commentary on 1 Corinthians 11  1640

Fuller was a reformed Anglican.

Burgess, Cornelius – The Scripture Directory for Church Officers and People, or, a Practical Commentary upon 1 Cor. 3  1659

Burgess (d. 1664) was one of the Westminster divines.

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2 Corinthians

None

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Chapters in 2 Corinthians

1500’s

Bird, Samuel – Lectures upon the 8th and 9th chapters of 2 Corinthians  ToC  1598

Bird’s (d. 1604) theological persuasion is unknown.

Rollock, Robert – 5 Sermons on 2 Cor. 5:1-18  d. 1599

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1600’s

Sibbes, Richard – A Learned Commentary or Exposition upon 2 Corinthians 1  d. 1635

Sibbes, Richard – Exposition of 2 Cor. 4  d. 1635  180 pp.  in Works, 4:307-488

Manton, Thomas – 40 Sermons on 2 Cor. 5  d. 1677

Burgess, Cornelius – An Expository Commentary, Doctrinal, Controversial and Practical upon 2 Corinthians 1  d. 1677  being 147 sermons

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Galatians

1500’s

Luther, Martin – Commentary on Galatians  Reformer

One exception that may be taken to this work is Luther’s teaching that Christ Himself became sin (that is: sinful) on the cross in order to make the Atonement.  On the contrary the sacrifice must be pure, righteous and without sin in order to be effectual.  There is a legal imputation of sin, but not an infusing thereof.  See John Murray on “The Imputation of Adam’s Sin” for a corrective to Luther on this point.

***  “‘I prefer this book of Martin Luther’s (except the Bible) before all the books that I have ever seen, as most fit for a wounded conscience.’ – Bunyan.  This is a great historic work, and is beyond criticism, on account of its great usefulness.  As a comment its accuracy might be questioned; but for emphatic utterances and clear statements of the great doctrine of the Epistle it remains altogether by itself, and must be judged per se.” – Spurgeon

Prime, John – An Exposition and Observations upon St. Paul to the Galatians, together with incident questions debated, and motives removed  ToC  1587

Prime (1550-1596) was reformed.

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1600’s

Perkins, William – A Commentary or Exposition upon Galatians 1-5  d. 1602

**  “Perkins was justly esteemed by his contemporaries as a master in theology.  This commentary is deeply theological, and reads like a body of divinity: truth compels us to confess that we find it dull.” – Spurgeon

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Chapters in Galatians

Torshell, Samuel – The Three questions of Free Justification, Christian liberty, The use of the Law, Explicated in a Brief comment on St. Paul to the Galatians, from 2:16 – 3:26  ToC  1632

Torshell (1604-1650) was English and reformed.

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Ephesians

1500’s

Ridley, Lancelot – A Commentary in English upon Saint Paul’s Epistle to the Ephesians for the instruction of them that be unlearned in tongues, gathered out of the holy scriptures and of the old catholic doctors of the church, and of the best authors that now a days do write  ToC  1540

Ridley was reformed.

**  “John Bale wrote in 1543: ‘The Commentary which that virtuous learned man, Master Lancelot Ridley, made upon St. Paul’s Epistle to the Ephesians, for the true erudition of his Christian brethren, hath my Lord Bonner here also condemned for heresy.  But what the cause is I cannot tell, unless it be for advancing the Gospel as the thing whereby we are made righteous.’  Our author is equally fierce against Anabaptists and Papists, but is not much of a commentator.” – Spurgeon

Hemmingsen, Niels – Ephesians Faithfully Expounded, both for the Benefit of the learned and unlearned.  Herein are handled the high mysteries of our Salvation, as may appear by the Table of Commonplaces…  1580

Hemmingsen (1513-1600) was a Lutheran.

**  “A Danish divine of high repute in his own day.  Some of his works were turned into English; but the translations, like the originals, are now left in undeserved oblivion.” – Spurgeon

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1600’s

Bayne, Paul – An Entire Commentary upon Ephesians  d. 1617

**  “Sibbes says of this work: ‘The greatest shall find matter to exercise themselves in; the meaner, matter of sweet comfort and holy instruction; and all confess that he hath brought some light to this Scripture.'” – Spurgeon

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Chapters in Ephesians

Goodwin, Thomas  †1680

An Exposition of Ephesians 1

An Exposition of 2:1-1114-16

An Exposition of Ephesians 3:16-21

Rollock, Robert – An Exposition of part of the Fifth and Sixth Chapters of St. Paul’s Epistle to the Ephesians   d. 1598  ‘In a volume containing sundry fragments of expositions.’ – Spurgeon  Here is the work in Latin.

**  “This renowned Scotchman’s writings generally come to us as translations from the Latin, and have been made preternaturally dull in the process of interpretation; but this appears to have been written in English by himself.  It is practical to a high degree, and goes into minute details of the married life, etc.  it will not be much appreciated in these days, though Dr. McCrie styles Rollock’s works ‘succinct and judicious.'” – Spurgeon

Goodwin, Thomas – An Exposition of Ephesians 5:30-32  d. 1680

Manton, Thomas – Sermons upon Eph. 5:1-27  325 pp.  in Works, vol. 19, p. 169 ff.

Gurnall, William – The Christian in Complete Armour; A Treatise of the Saints’ War against the Devil  on Eph. 6:10-20

“This exhaustive exposition by a Puritan writer ably treats the spiritual warfare of the saints and the equipment given them by God to assure the victory.” – Cyril J. Barber

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Latin Commentary on Ephesians

Boyd, Robert – Commentary on the Epistle of the Apostle Paul to the Ephesians  (London, 1652)  The end of the volume has indices of words and phrases, and of chief common places and theological questions.

Boyd (1578-1627) was a Scottish covenanter.  

“His posthumously published Latin commentary on Ephesians… is an enduring monument to his learning.  The work, however, is far more than a commentary and includes discussions of virtually every important locus of a systematic theology… his intention in this was to derive the chief heads of Christian doctrine from Scripture, Ephesians being deliberately chosen for the purpose…” – James Kirk (Dict. of Scot. CH&T)

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Philippians

Ridley, Lancelot – An Exposition in English upon the Epistle of St. Paul to the Philippians  ToC  1550

Ridley (1576) was a reformed Anglican.

Airay, Henry – Lectures upon the whole of Philippians  1618

**  “Mr. Grosart says: ‘You will look in vain in this commentary for erudite criticism or subtle exegesis in the modern sense: but there seems to us to be an instructively true following up of the Apostolic thoughts, and a quick insight into their bearings and relative force.” – Spurgeon

Daille, John – An Exposition of Philippians  Buy  d. 1670

Daille was of the reformed tradition, though a hypothetical universalist.

**  “Written in a deliciously florid style.  Very sweet and evangelical: after the French manner.” – Spurgeon

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Philippians 3

Sibbes, Richard – An Exposition of Philippians 3  1639, This is not in Sibbes’ 7 volume set of Works

Manton, Thomas – Sermons upon Philippians 3:7-21  †1677  175 pp.  in Works, vol. 20

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Colossians

1500’s

Ridley, Lancelot – An Exposition in English upon the Epistle of St. Paul to the Colossians, wherein the letter is purely declared, with many good exhortations to flee vice and to take virtue  ToC  1548

Ridley (d. 1576) was a reformed Anglican.

Rollock, Robert – Lectures on Colossians  EEBO  †1599  41 Lectures

** – ‘It is said that when this great divine died the entire population of Edinburgh attended his funeral.  His Lectures on Colossians were once very popular, but are now extremely scarce.  The style is very simple and colloquial, and the matter far from profound.’ – Spurgeon

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1600’s

Cartwright, Thomas – An Exposition of Colossians in sundry sermons  d. 1603

Cartwright (1534-1603) was an influential and leading English presbyterian.

**  “This is but a small affair, consisting of scanty and second rate ‘notes’ by a hearer.  Yet what there is of it has the true ring, and is rich in spirituality.” – Spurgeon

Elton, Edward – An Exposition of the Epistle of St Paul to the Colossians delivered in sundry sermons 1615

Elton (d. 1624) was a reformed minister near London.

***  “A Puritan work; strongly Calvinistic, popular, and very full.” – Spurgeon

Byfield, Nicholas – An Exposition upon the Epistle to the Colossians  1615

***  “The author lived in intense pain, and died at 44, yet he produced quite a mountain of literature.  He writes like an earnest, faithful man, resolved to keep back nothing of the counsel of God; but he too little studies brevity, and consequently he wearies most readers.  He is always worth consulting.” – Spurgeon

Davenant, John – An Exposition of Colossians, vols. 1, 2  †1641

Davenant was of the reformed tradition, though a hypothetical universalist.

***  “I know no exposition upon a detached portion of Scripture (with the single exception of Owen on the Hebrews) that will compare with it in all points.  Leighton is superior in sweetness, but far inferior in depth, accuracy, and discursiveness.” – Charles Bridges, as quoted by Spurgeon

Daille, John – 49 Sermons upon the Whole Epistle of the Apostle St. Paul to the Colossians  ToC  Buy  d. 1670

Daillie (1594-1670) was of the reformed tradition, though a hypothetical-universalitst.

On his work on the Philippians:  **  “Written in a deliciously florid style.  Very sweet and evangelical: after the French manner.” – Spurgeon

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Chapters in Colossians

Bayne, Paul – Commentary on Colossians 1 & 2  ToC  1634

***  “…Edifying and very rare.” – Spurgeon

Lockyer, Nicholas – England faithfully watched with in her wounds: or, Christ as a Father Sitting up with his Children in their Swooning State, which is the sum of several lectures painfully preached upon Colossians 1  ToC  1646  Here are his sermons on Col. 1:11-12

***  “Rich, full, simple.  A fair specimen of plain Puritan preaching.” – Spurgeon

Manton, Thomas – Christ’s Eternal Existence and the Dignity of his Person Asserted and Proved, in Opposition to the Doctrine of the Socinians  8 sermons on Col. 1:14-20  89 pp.  in Works, vol. 1, p. 415 ff.


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1 Thessalonians

Jewel, John – An Exposition upon the Two Epistles of the apostle St. Paul to the Thessalonians  1571

**  “Hooker calls Jewel ‘the jewel of bishops’.  This work is in the usual style of the first Reformers, but rather more lively than most of them.  Many of the topics touched upon were peculiar to the times in which the exposition was written.  It will serve as a good specimen of the preaching of the Fathers of the English Church.” – Spurgeon

Rollock, Robert – Lectures upon 1 & 2 Thessalonians  d. 1599

**  “This renowned Scotchman’s writings generally come to us as translations from the Latin, and have been made preternaturally dull in the process of interpretation; but this appears to have been written in English by himself.  It is practical to a high degree, and goes into minute details of the married life, etc.  it will not be much appreciated in these days, though Dr. McCrie styles Rollock’s works ‘succinct and judicious.'” – Spurgeon

Sclater, William – An Exposition with Notes upon the First & Second Epistle to the Thessalonians  1619

Sclater (1575-1626) was a reformed puritan.

**  “Sclater is antique; but, in the usual Puritanic manner, he gives very instructive disquisitions upon a vast variety of topics suggested by the text.” – Spurgeon

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1 Thessalonians 4

Case, Thomas – Mount Pisgah, or, A Prospect of Heaven, being an exposition of 1 Thess. 4:13 to the end of the chapter, divided into three parts  Buy  1670

Case (d. 1682) was a reformed puritan.

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2 Thessalonians

1500’s

Jewel, John – An Exposition upon the Two Epistles of the Apostle St. Paul to the Thessalonians  1571

**  “Hooker calls Jewel ‘the jewel of bishops’.  This work is in the usual style of the first Reformers, but rather more lively than most of them.  Many of the topics touched upon were peculiar to the times in which the exposition was written.  It will serve as a good specimen of the preaching of the Fathers of the English Church.” – Spurgeon

Rollock, Robert – Lectures upon the First and Second Epistles of Paul to the Thessalonians  d. 1599

**  “This renowned Scotchman’s writings generally come to us as translations from the Latin, and have been made preternaturally dull in the process of interpretation; but this appears to have been written in English by himself.  It is practical to a high degree, and goes into minute details of the married life, etc.  it will not be much appreciated in these days, though Dr. McCrie styles Rollock’s works ‘succinct and judicious.'” – Spurgeon

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1600’s

Bradshaw, William – A Plain and Pithy Exposition of the 2 Thessalonians  d. 1618

**  “As we cannot get a sight of this, perhaps some reader will present us with a copy.” – Spurgeon

Sclater, William – An Exposition with Notes upon the Second Epistle to the Thessalonians  1619

 

Sclater (1575-1626) was a reformed puritan.

**  “Sclater is antique; but, in the usual Puritanic manner, he gives very instructive disquisitions upon a vast variety of topics suggested by the text.” – Spurgeon

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2 Thessalonians 1

Manton, Thomas – Sermons upon 2 Thess. 1:4-12  16 sermons, 152 pp. in Works, vol. 20

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2 Thess. 2: the Antichrist

1500’s

Calvin, John – Commentary on 2 Thess. 2:3-10  †1564  14 pages

Carlile, Christopher – An Interpretation of 2 Thess. 2 which describes the Antichrist, I mean the Pope  1572

Carlile (ca. 1530-1588) was an Anglican, a student of Immanuel Tremellius and was a Hebrew scholar.

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1600’s

Du Moulin, Pierre – The Prophecy in 2 Thess. 2:3-11  1613

Squire, John – A Plain Exposition on 2 Thessalonians 2:1-13, proving the Pope to be Antichrist, being [28] Lectures  ToC  1630

**  “Squire works out the point of the Pope’s being Antichrist with very great cogency of reasoning.  The exposition of the Epistle is lost in the point aimed at: but that point is of the utmost importance.” – Spurgeon

Hall, Edmund – The Apostasy, the Antichrist, or a Scriptural discourse of the Apostasy and the Antichrist, by way of comment upon the Twelve First Verses of 2 Thess. 2 under which are opened many of the dark prophecies of the Old Testament, which relate to the calling of the Jews, and the glorious things to be affected at the seventh trumpet through the world, together with a discourse of slaying the witnesses, and the immediate effects thereof    1653

Hall (1619-1687) was a reformed Anglican.

Guild, William – On 2 Thess. 2:3-9, Antichrist… the Popes of Rome proven to be that Man of Sin…  1655  see chs. 3, 7, 9-11 & 16-18

Guild was a Scottish covenanter.

Manton, Thomas – 18 Sermons on 2 Thess. 2  d. 1677  180 pages

***  “Here Manton smites heavily at Popery.  Richard Baxter wrote a commendatory preface to this valuable exposition.” – Spurgeon

Wilkinson, Henry – The Pope of Rome is Antichrist  on 2 Thess. 2:3-10  in Puritan Sermons, 6:1-25  †1690

Wilkinson was reformed.

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1 Timothy

1500’s

Luther, Martin – Works, vol. 28: 1 Corinthians 7, 1 Corinthians 15, Lectures on 1 Timothy  Buy

Calvin, John – Sermons on the Epistles of St. Paul to Timothy and Titus  Buy

***  “Quite a different work from Calvin’s Commentaries.” – Spurgeon

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1 Timothy 4

Du Moulin, Pierre – The Prophecy in 1 Tim. 4:1-4  1613

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2 Timothy

Calvin, John – Sermons on the Epistles of St. Paul to Timothy and Titus  Buy

***  “Quite a different work from Calvin’s Commentaries.” – Spurgeon

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Chapters in 2 Timothy

Barlow, John – An Exposition of 2 Timothy 1  ToC  1625

Barlow (b. 1580-1)

***  “By a master in Israel.  Thoroughly practical, deeply experimental, and soundly doctrinal.” – Spurgeon

Hall, Thomas – A Practical and Polemical Commentary on 2 Tim. 3-4  GB  1658

Hall (1632-58)

***  “Hall is often found in union with Barlow, completing the Commentary on 2 Timothy, as he completed Amos.  He is a masterly expositor, of the old-fashioned school.” – Spurgeon


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Titus

1500’s

Luther, Martin – Works, vol. 29: Lectures on Titus, Philemon, and Hebrews  Buy

Calvin, John – Sermons on the Epistles of St. Paul to Timothy and Titus  Buy

***  “Quite a different work from Calvin’s Commentaries.” – Spurgeon

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1600’s

Taylor, Thomas – A Commentary upon the Epistle of St. Paul written to Titus. Preached in Cambridge  1612

Taylor (1576-1632) was a reformed puritan.

***  “The title-page calls Thomas Taylor ‘a famous and most elaborate divine.’  He was a preacher at Paul’s Cross during the reigns of Elizabeth and James I, and a voluminous writer.  This Commentary will well repay the reader.”

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Philemon

1500’s

Luther, Martin – Works, vol. 29: Lectures on Titus, Philemon, and Hebrews  Buy

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1600’s

Attersoll, William – A Commentary upon the Epistle to Philemon  Ref  1612

***  “A long comment upon a short epistle.  The pious author labors to keep to his text, and succeeds in bringing out of it a mass of quaint practical teaching.” – Spurgeon

Dyke, Daniel – Two Treatises: The One a Most Fruitful Exposition upon Philemon; the other, the School of Affliction  1614

Dyke was a reformed puritan.

**  “Dyke’s remarks are memorably practical and full of common sense.  He abounds in proverbs.  The work is not very valuable as an exposition of the words, but excels in making use of them.” – Spurgeon

Jones, William – A Commentary upon the Epistles of St. Paul to Philemon and to the Hebrews, together with a compendious explication of the Second and Third Epistles of St. John  1635

Jones was reformed. 

***  “Very lively, sprightly, colloquial lectures, by a Suffolk divine, who thinks the Brownists and Dissenters were not persecuted.  “Christ was whipped, that was persecution; Christ whipped some out of the temple, that was no persecution.”  Despite his intolerance he says some uncommonly racy things.” – Spurgeon

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Hebrews

1500’s

Luther, Martin – Works, vol. 29: Lectures on Titus, Philemon, and Hebrews  Buy

1600’s

Dickson, David – A Short Explanation of the Epistle of Paul to the Hebrews   Buy  1635  

Dickson was a prominent Scottish covenanter.  This work on Hebrews is different than his work on all the epistles.

*** – ‘We need say no more than–get it, and you will find abundance of suggestions for profitable trains of thought.’

Jones, William – A Commentary upon the Epistles of St. Paul to Philemon and to the Hebrews, together with a compendious explication of the Second and Third Epistles of St. John  1635

Jones (1561-1636) was reformed. 

**  “Very lively, sprightly, colloquial lectures, by a Suffolk divine, who thinks the Brownists and Dissenters were not persecuted.  “Christ was whipped, that was persecution; Christ whipped some out of the temple, that was no persecution.”  Despite his intolerance he says some uncommonly racy things.” – Spurgeon

Gouge, William – Commentary on Hebrews, vols. 1 (1-5), 2 (6-10), 3 (11-End)  Buy  1655

***  “We greatly prize Gouge.  Many will think his system of observations cumbrous, and so, perhaps, it is; but upon any topic which he touches he gives outlines which may supply sermons for months.”

Lawson, George – An Exposition of the Epistle to the Hebrews wherein the Text is cleared, Theopolitica [the city of God] improved, the Socinian comment Examined  1662

Lawson (c.1598-1678) was reformed.

**  “Richard Baxter says: ‘I must thankfully acknowledge that I learned more from Mr. Lawson than from any divine that ever I conversed with.”

Owen, John – Exposition of Hebrews, vols. 1 (Prefatory), 2 (chs. 1-4), 3 (5-8), 4 (9-13)  †1683  The volumes average about 800 pp.

***  “Out of scores of commendations of this colossal work we select but one.  Dr. [Thomas] Chalmers pronounced it ‘a work of gigantic strength as well as gigantic size; and he who hath mastered it is very little short, both in respect to the doctrinal and practical Christianity, of being an erudite and accomplished theologian.'” – Spurgeon

“…with the excercitations, it may be reckoned one of the most valuable systems of doctrinal, practical and experimental divinity, that is to be met with in the English language.” – Edward Williams

Abridgments of Owen (shortest to longest):

Epistle to the Hebrews  Preview  Buy  abridged in one volume by M.J. Tyron, Preface by H. Lockyer, Kregel Publications, 283 pp.

This inexpensive paperback book is NECESSARY.  The abridgment covers each verse in about half a page to 2 pages, whereas the original often spends 30-60 pages on each verse.  Introductory material to the whole book is not included in this abridgment.  The abridgment is great if you simply want to quickly open the volume and find out how Owen interpreted a given verse with some relevant comments.  Doing the same in the original may take you all day.  Read the abridgment straight through in several sittings and you will have a great view of Owen on the whole book.  See the Preview link.

Exposition of Hebrews: Revised and Abridged, vol. 1 (Intro), 2 (1-4), 3 (5-9), 4 (10-13) by Dr. Edward Williams  The volumes average about 450 pp., about half the number of the original.  The editor’s preface explains his, quite good, philosophy of abridgment.

Williams (1750–1813) was a Welsh nonconformist minister.

Williams: “The reader… may depend upon on it, that all the valuable, useful, and pertinent criticisms; the most forcible arguments in proof of any important point; the most evangelical and sublime sentiments and doctrines; the most close, convincing, and edifying improvements; the most animating and pathetic addresses and exhortations, contained in the other [original work], are preserved in this.”

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Chapters in Hebrews

Dering, Edward – 27 Lectures, or Readings, upon part of the Epistle written to the Hebrews  [Heb. 1-6:6]  1577

Dering was reformed and a puritan.

***  “Mainly aimed at the errors of the Church of Rome, and at the practical questions of the Reformation period.  A learned but antiquated set of lectures.” – Spurgeon

Roberts, Huw – The Day of Hearing: or, Six Lectures upon the latter part of the third chapter of the Epistle to the Hebrews of the time and means that God has appointed for man to come to the knowledge of his truth that they may be saved from his wrath  ToC  1600

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Hebrews 11-12

Manton, Thomas – 66 Sermons on Hebrews 11:1-4, 11:4-28, 11:29-31  704 pp.  in Works, vol. 13-15

***  “Exhaustive.  Manton piles up his matter heaps upon heaps.”

Perkins, William – A Cloud of Faithful Witnesses, leading to the heavenly Canaan, or, a Commentary upon Hebrews 11  d. 1602

**  “Good in its day, but now superseded.  Very many points are discussed which would now be regarded as ridiculous: as for instance, whether a man may travel in a foreign country.  It is terribly prosy.”

Shaw, John – The Catalogue of the Hebrew saints, canonized by St. Paul, Heb. 11, further explained and applied  ToC  1659

Shaw was a reformed puritan.

Burroughs, Jeremiah

Moses, his Self-Denial , Delivered in a Treatise upon Heb. 11:24  EEBO  Buy  1641

Moses his Choice, with his Eye Fixed upon Heaven: Discovering the Happy Condition of a Self-Denying Heart, a Treatise upon Hebrews 11:25-26  Buy  1650

The Excellency of Holy Courage in Evil Times  Buy  1661  on Heb. 11:27

Andrews, G. – Sermons upon the Twelfth Chapter of the Epistle of Paul the Apostle to the Hebrews 12  1711  published posthumously, Andrews was a minister in Edinburgh, Scotland

**  “Thoroughly Scotch.  Sound, but somewhat polix and commonplace.” – Spurgeon

Sylvester, Matthew – The Christian’s Race and Patience, Sermons on Hebrews 12, vol. 1, 2  Buy  1702-8

Sylvester (1636-1708)

**  “Not of the first class; yet respectable sermons.” – Spurgeon


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The General Epistles

Luther, Martin – Works, vol. 30: The Catholic Epistles  Buy

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James

1500’s

Hemmingsen, Niels – A Learned and Fruitful Commentary upon James  1577

*  “The price which this book fetches is preposterous.  It is hard antique reading.” – Spurgeon

Turnbull, Richard – An Exposition upon the canonical Epistle of St. James, Divided into 28 lectures or sermons  1592

Turnbull (d. 1593) was reformed. 

**  “Old and occupied with Popish controversies.  Good, solid, and tedious.” – Spurgeon

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1600’s

Mayer, John – Praxis Theologica: or the Epistle of James Resolved, Expounded and Preached upon  1629

On his whole Bible commentary:  **  ‘A rare and valuable author… The six volumes, folio, are a most judicious and able digest of former commentators, enriched with the author’s own notes, forming altogether one of the fullest and best of learned English commentaries; not meant for popular use, but invaluable to the student.  He is a link between the modern school, at the head of which I put Poole and Henry, and the older school who mostly wrote in Latin, and were tinctured with the conceits of those schoolmen who gathered like flies around the corpse of Aristotle.  He appears to have written before Diodati and Trapp, but lacked opportunity to publish.  I fear he will be forgotten, as there is but little prospect of the republication of so diffuse, and perhaps heavy, an author.  He is a very Alp of learning, but cold and lacking in spirituality, hence his lack of popularity.’ – Spurgeon

Manton, Thomas – A Practical Commentary, or, an Exposition with Notes on the Epistle of James; delivered in Sunday Weekly Lectures  d. 1677  460 pp.

***  “In Manton’s best style.  An exhaustive work, as far as the information of the period admitted.  Few such books are written now.” – Spurgeon

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James 1

Goodwin, Thomas – A Exposition of James 1:1-5, Patience and her Perfect Work  d. 1680

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1 Peter

1500’s

Luther, Martin – A Commentary or Exposition upon 1 Peter  d. 1546

***  “In Luther’s racy style.  One of his best productions.  Copies are scarce as white elephants, and consequently expensive.” – Spurgeon

Alley, William – The Poor Man’s Library Rapsodiæ: G.A. Bishop of Exceter upon the First Epistle of Saint Peter, read publicly in the cathedral church of saint Paul, within the city of London  ToC  1560

**  “A curious old Black Letter Folio.  The exposition on Peter is mainly occupied with the questions and controversies of the Reforming period.  Do not buy it.” – Spurgeon

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1600’s

Rogers, John – A Godly and Fruitful Exposition upon all the First Epistle of Peter  d. 1636

***  “Rogers was a true Boanerges [son of thunder].  His style is earnestly practical and wisely experimental.  This is one of the scarcest and liveliest of the Puritan expositions.” – Spurgeon

Ames, William – An Analytical Exposition of both the Epistles of the Apostle Peter  1641

**  “Too much divided and subdivided, chopped up and cut into dice pieces and laid in order; for after all, there is very little meat in it.  It is an analysis, and little more.” – Spurgeon

Nisbet, Alexander – A Brief Exposition of the First and Second Epistles General of Peter  ToC  Buy  1658

*** – ‘A judicious and gracious Scotch commentary, after the style of Dickson and Hutcheson.’ – Spurgeon

Leighton, Robert – A Practical Commentary on 1 Peter, vols. 12   Buy  d. 1684

Leighton (1611-84) was an evangelical Scottish bishop.  His commentary is very good and is full of heart religion.

*** – “Dr. Henry Mills thus wrote of Leighton’s works: ‘There is a spirit in them I never met with in any other human writings, nor can I read many lines in them without being moved.’  We need scarcely commend this truly heavenly work.  It is a favorite with all spiritual men.” – Spurgeon

“One of the best expository works on I Peter. Leighton provides his reader with the results of his vast learning without ostentation; his theology is accurate and his eloquence unmatched. Devotional. Anglican.” – Cyril J. Barber

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Chapters in 1 Peter

Byfield, Nicholas – A Commentary upon 1 Pet. 1-3:11  d. 1622 

**  “Byfield is an able and pious divine, but he is not very vivacious, and neither in manner nor matter is he at all original.” – Spurgeon

Pigg, Oliver – A Comfortable Treatise upon 1 Pet. 4:12-19  1582  87 pp.

Pigg (b. 1551) was an English puritan.

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2 Peter

1500’s

Luther, Martin – A Commentary or Exposition upon 2 Peter  d. 1546

***  “In Luther’s racy style.  One of his best productions.  Copies are scarce as white elephants, and consequently expensive.” – Spurgeon

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1600’s

Symson, Archibald – Exposition upon the Second Epistle General of St. Peter  1632

Simson (1564-1628) was a pastor in Dalkeith, Scotland.

**  “Abundance of matter, pithily expressed.  Symson is among the oldest and rarest of the English divines.” – Spurgeon

Ames, William – An Analytical Exposition of both the Epistles of the Apostle Peter  1641

Ames was a New England puritan.

**  “Too much divided and subdivided, chopped up and cut into dice pieces and laid in order; for after all, there is very little meat in it.  It is an analysis, and little more.” – Spurgeon

Adams, Thomas – An Exposition upon 2 Peter  d. 1652

Adams was a puritan.

***  “Full of quaintnesses, holy wit, bright thought, and deep instruction.  We like Adams better in commenting than in preaching.  His great work is quite by itself, and in its own way remains unrivalled.  We know no richer and racier reading.” – Spurgeon

Nisbet, Alexander – A Brief Exposition of the First and Second Epistles General of Peter  ToC  Buy  1658

*** – ‘A judicious and gracious Scotch commentary, after the style of Dickson and Hutcheson.’

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Chapters in 2 Peter

Denison, Stephen – An Exposition upon 2 Peter 1, with the Principal Doctrines Naturally Arising from every Verse of the Same Chapter 1622

Denison (d. 1649) was a reformed minister in London.

Mede, Joseph – A Paraphrase and Exposition of the Prophesy of St. Peter concerning the Day of Christ’s Second Coming, Described in the Third Chapter of His Second Epistle.  As Also, how the Conflagration, Or Destruction of the World by Fire… is to be Understood  d. 1638

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The Letters of John

Poole, Matthew – Critical Synopsis of the Bible: 1 John – Jude  Buy

This is different and much larger than Poole’s Annotations on Scripture.  Here Poole gives something of a history of interpretation (from Jewish writers until Christian interpreters of Poole’s own day) on every verse of the Bible.

‘…you will find in Poole’s Synopsis a marvelous collection of all the wisdom and folly of the critics.  It is a large cyclopedia worthy of the days when theologians could be cyclopean, and had not shrunk from folios to octavos.  Query—a query for which I will not demand an answer—has one of you beaten the dust from the venerable copy of Poole which loads our library shelves? 

Yet as Poole spent no less than ten years in compiling it, it should be worthy of your frequent notice—ten years, let me add, spent in Amsterdam in exile for the truth’s sake from his native land.  His work is based on an earlier compilation entitled Critici Sacri, containing the concentrated light of a constellation of learned men who have never been excelled in any age or country.’ – Spurgeon

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1 John

Cotton, John – A Practical Commentary, or an Exposition with Observations, Reasons, and Uses upon the First Epistle General of John  Ref  PoD  1652

***  “Calamy puts his imprimatur upon this book, and speaks of the author’s name as ‘deservedly precious among the saints of God.’  In doctrine and experience he is a noble teacher.”

“A Puritan work first published in 1657. So extensive that the reader can virtually develop a systematic theology from its contents.” – Cyril J. Barber

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Chapters in 1 John

Binning, Hugh – Fellowship with God, or, 28 Sermons on 1 John 1 & 2:1-3, wherein the true ground and foundation of attaining, the spiritual way of entertaining fellowship with the Father and the Son and the blessed condition of such as attain to it, are most succinctly and dilucidly explained  1653, in Works, p. 271 ff.

Binning was a Scottish covenanter.

***  “Milk for babes, and meat for men; calls to backsliders, and comforts for mourners.  ‘There is no speaking,’ says Durham, ‘after Mr. Binning; truly he had the tongue of the learned, and knew how to speak a word in season.” – Spurgeon

Hardy, Nathanael – The First General Epistle of St. John Unfolded and Applied  d. 1670  385 pp.  This is only on the first two chapters only, being 59 sermons.

Hardy (1618-70) was reformed and was a puritan.

***  “The Editor of Nichol’s Edition says, ‘This Exposition is only a fragment.  It was intended to consist of five parts, corresponding generally with the five chapters of the Epistle; but only two of them were accomplished.  In matter, the sermons are purely evangelical; in spirit, they are earnest and affectionate; in manner, they are eloquent and impressive.’  This is rather too ardent a commendation.” – Spurgeon

Manton, Thomas – Sermons upon 1 John 3:1-4, 3:5-24  32 Sermons in Works, vols. 20-21

Cotton, John – Christ the Fountain of Life: or, Sundry choice sermons on part of the 5th chapter of the first Epistle of St. John  Ref  1651

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2 John

Marlorate, Augustine – An Exposition of 2 John  d. 1560

Marlorate was reformed.

Marlorat (1506-1562) was reformed.  His commentaries are particularly valuable as they are compendiums of block quotes from some of the best reformed divines of his day on the passages of that particular Biblical book.  See here for an excerpt from his commentary on John. 

On his commentary on Matthew:  ** – “Marlorate was an eminent French reformer, preacher and martyr.  His commentaries contain the cream of the older writers, and are in much esteem, but are very rare.  He wrote on the whole New Testament, but we have in English only the Gospels [2-3 John] and Jude [and Revelation 1 & 13].” – Spurgeon

Jones, William – A Commentary upon the Epistles of St. Paul to Philemon and to the Hebrews, together with a compendious explication of the second and third Epistles of St. John  1635

Jones was reformed. 

***  “Very lively, sprightly, colloquial lectures, by a Suffolk divine, who thinks the Brownists and Dissenters were not persecuted.  “Christ was whipped, that was persecution; Christ whipped some out of the temple, that was no persecution.”  Despite his intolerance he says some uncommonly racy things.” – Spurgeon

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3 John

1500’s

Marlorate, Augustine – An Exposition of 3 John  d. 1560  14 pp.

Marlorat (1506-1562) was reformed.

On his commentary on Matthew: ** – “Marlorate was an eminent French reformer, preacher and martyr.  His commentaries contain the cream of the older writers, and are in much esteem, but are very rare.  He wrote on the whole New Testament, but we have in English only the Gospels [2-3 John] and Jude [and Revelation 1 & 13].” – Spurgeon

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1600’s

Jones, William – A Commentary upon the Epistles of St. Paul to Philemon and to the Hebrews, together with a compendious explication of the second and third Epistles of St. John  1635

Jones was reformed. 

***  “Very lively, sprightly, colloquial lectures, by a Suffolk divine, who thinks the Brownists and Dissenters were not persecuted.  “Christ was whipped, that was persecution; Christ whipped some out of the temple, that was no persecution.”  Despite his intolerance he says some uncommonly racy things.” – Spurgeon

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Jude

1500’s

Ridley, Lancelot – An Exposition in the Epistle of Jude the apostle of Christ wherein he setteth plainly before every man’s eyes false apostles, and their crafts, by ye which they have long deceived simple Christian people.  ToC  1538

On his work on Ephesians:  **  “John Bale wrote in 1543: ‘The Commentary which that virtuous learned man, Master Lancelot Ridley, made upon St. Paul’s Epistle to the Ephesians, for the true erudition of his Christian brethren, hath my Lord Bonner here also condemned for heresy.  But what the cause is I cannot tell, unless it be for advancing the Gospel as the thing whereby we are made righteous.’  Our author is equally fierce against Anabaptists and Papists, but is not much of a commentator.” – Spurgeon

Luther, Martin – A Commentary or Exposition upon Jude  d. 1546 

***  “In Luther’s racy style.  One of his best productions.  Copies are scarce as white elephants, and consequently expensive.” – Spurgeon

Marlorat, Augustine – Commentary on Jude  †1562

Marlorat (1506-1562) was reformed.  His commentaries are particularly valuable as they are compendiums of block quotes from some of the best reformed divines of his day on the passages of that particular Biblical book.  See here for an excerpt from his commentary on John. 

**“Marlorate was an eminent French reformer, preacher and martyr.  His commentaries contain the cream of the older writers, and are in much esteem, but are very rare.  He wrote on the whole New Testament, but we have in English only the Gospels [2-3 John] and Jude [and Revelation 1 & 13].” – Spurgeon

Turnbull, Richard – An Exposition upon the Canonical Epistle of St. Jude, Divided into Ten Sermons or Lectures  1592

Turnbull (1593) was reformed.

*  “Old and occupied with Popish controversies.  Good solid, and tedious.” – Spurgeon

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1600’s

Perkins, William – A Godly and Learned Exposition upon the Whole Epistle of Jude, containing 66 Sermons  d. 1602

**  “Perkins was regarded by his contemporaries as a paragon of learning, but his writings fail to interest the generality of readers.” – Spurgeon

Willet, Andrew – A Catholicon, that is, A General Preservative or Remedy Against the Pseudo-Catholic Religion gathered out of the catholic Epistle of St. Jude, briefly expounded and aptly, according to the time, applied to more than half a hundred of popish errors, and as many corruptions of manners  1602

***  “This book is in the [British] Museum, but we cannot procure a copy.” – Spurgeon

Otes, Samuel – An Explanation of the General Epistle of Saint Jude in 41 Sermons  1633  525 pp.

**  “Of the conforming Puritan style, full of quaintness and singularities of learning.  A book by no means to be despised.” – Spurgeon

Manton, Thomas – A Practical Commentary on Jude  ToC  1658

***  “Manton at first gave up all idea of printing this book on Jude, when he found that Jenkyn had taken up the subject; but he afterwards changed his mind.  He tells us: ‘I consulted with my reverend brother’s book, and when I found any point at large discussed by him, I either omitted it or mentioned it very briefly; so that his labors will be necessary to supply the weakness of mine.” – Spurgeon

Poole, Matthew – Critical Synopsis of the Bible: 1 John – Jude  Buy  †1679

This is different and much larger than Poole’s Annotations on Scripture.  Here Poole gives something of a history of interpretation (from Jewish writers until Christian interpreters of Poole’s own day) on every verse of the Bible.

‘…you will find in Poole’s Synopsis a marvelous collection of all the wisdom and folly of the critics.  It is a large cyclopedia worthy of the days when theologians could be cyclopean, and had not shrunk from folios to octavos.  Query—a query for which I will not demand an answer—has one of you beaten the dust from the venerable copy of Poole which loads our library shelves?  Yet as Poole spent no less than ten years in compiling it, it should be worthy of your frequent notice—ten years, let me add, spent in Amsterdam in exile for the truth’s sake from his native land.  His work is based on an earlier compilation entitled Critic Sacri, containing the concentrated light of a constellation of learned men who have never been excelled in any age or country.’ – Spurgeon

Jenkyn, William – An Exposition of Jude  †1685  850 pp.

***  “Earnest and popular, but very full, and profoundly learned.  A treasure-house of good things.” – Spurgeon

“This work preceded Manton’s monumental treatment. Manton regarded this exposition with such awe that he purposely avoided duplicating any of its material in his own work. Should be purchased if found.” – Cyril J. Barber


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Revelation 2-3: the Seven Letters

1500’s

Perkins, William – A Godly and Learned Exposition or Commentary upon the Three First Chapters of the Revelation. Preached in Cambridge  1595  220 pp.

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1600’s

More, Henry – An Exposition of the Seven Epistles to the Seven churches together with a brief discourse of Idolatry, with application to the Church of Rome  1669  140 pp.

More (1614-1687) was an Arminian, Latitudinarian Anglican. 

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Revelation: Partial Preterist Commentaries

1500’s

Roman Catholic, in Latin

Henten, John – Enarrationes vetustissimorum theologorum, in acta quidem apostolorum et in omnes D. Pauli ac catholicas epistolas ab Oecumenio : in apocalypsim vero  1545

Henten (1499-1566) was a Roman Catholic.

Salmeron, Alfonso – Disputationum in Epistolas Canonicas, et Apocalypsim: tomus quartus ac omnium operum postremus  1602

Salmeron (1515-1585) was a Roman Catholic, Jesuit.

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1600’s

Roman Catholic, in Latin

Alcazar, Luis – Vestigatio Arcani Sensus in Apocalypsi  1619

Alcazar (1554–1613) was a Roman Catholic,Spanish Jesuit.

“The praeterist view… is said to have been first promulgated in anything like completeness by the Jesuit Alcasar, in his “Vestigatio Arcani Sensus in Apocalypsi” (1604).  Very nearly, the same plan was adopted by Grotius. The next great name among this school of interpreters is that of Bossuet the great antagonist of Protestantism.” – Henry Alford, as quoted by Ron Cooke 

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Anglicans

Grotius, Hugo – Annotationes In Novum Testamentum, vol. 8: Continens Annotationes In Epistolas Catholicas Et Iohannis Apocalypsin

Grotius (1583-1645) was an Arminian, Latitudinarian, Erastian, Anglican, who wrote a commentary on the whole Bible.

Hammond, Henry – A Paraphrase of RevelationAnnotations on the Revelation  The first 12 pages of the Annotations is ‘A Premonition Concerning the Interpretation of the Apocalypse’

Hammond (1605–1660) was an Arminian Anglican.

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Roman Catholic, in French

Bousset, Jacques – L’Apocalypse avec une explication  1690

Bousset (1627-1704) was a Roman Catholic Bishop, supporter of the absolute Divine Right of kings and was an antagonist to Protestantism.

“In 1688, Jesuit-educated and Preterist, Bishop Bossuet dropped a bombshell on Protestants by publishing his scathing indictment of Protestantism, The History of the Variations of the Protestant Churches.  Bossuet’s purpose is so doing was to show the lack of unity and succession of Protestant doctrines through the ages (which the Calvinists claimed), unlike the unity and apostolic doctrines of the Catholic Church, thus fulfilling the promise of Jesus in Matt. 16:18. Using the Protestant belief (that there have always been believers who have held to their anti-Catholic doctrines) against them, he proposes arguments proving the unorthodox Christianity of all the groups Protestants claimed as forefathers.” – Rand Winburn

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Revelation:  Historicist Commentaries

1500’s

Bullinger, Henry – A Hundred Sermons upon the Apocalypse of Jesus Christ revealed indeed by the angel of the Lord, but seen or received and written by the apostle and Evangelist St. John  1561

Bullinger (1504-1575), the reformer of Zurich, was reformed.

Bale, John – The Image of both Churches after the most wonderful and heavenly Revelation of St. John the Evangelist, containing a very fruitful exposition or paraphrase upon the same.  Wherein it is conferred with the other scriptures, and most authorized histories  d. 1563

Fulke, William – Prælections upon the Sacred and Holy Revelation of St. John  1573

Fulke (1538-1589) was a reformed Anglican.

Daneau, Lambert – A Treatise Touching Antichrist, wherein the place, the time, the form, the workmen, the upholders, the proceeding, and lastly, the ruin and overthrow of the kingdom of Antichrist, is plainly laid open out of the Word of God: where also many dark, and hard places both of Daniel and the Revelation are made manifest.  ToC  1589

Napier, John – A Plain Discovery of the Whole Revelation of St. John set down in two treatises: the one searching and proving the true interpretation thereof: the other applying the same paraphrastically and historically to the text  1593

Napier (1550-1617) was reformed.  He was the mathematician who invented logarithms.

Gifford, George – Sermons upon the Whole Book of the Revelation  1599  

Gifford (1547-1600) was a Reformed puritan.

Junius, Francis 

Annotations on the Revelation of St. John  1599, in The New Testament of our Lord Jesus Christ: Translated out of Greek by Theodore Beza

The Apocalypse: A Brief and Learned Commentary upon the Revelation of St. John the apostle and evangelist, applied unto the history of the Catholic and Christian Church  1592

Junius was a major reformed figure of his day and a professor at the University of Heidelberg.

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1600’s

Cartwright, Thomas – A Plain Explanation of the Whole Revelation of St. John, very necessary and comfortable in these days of trouble and affliction in the church  ToC  d. 1603

Symonds, William – By the Method of the Revelation, presenting to public view those Cananites over whom our Lord Jesus Christ and his holy Church shall triumph after several battles. That which is past is showed in a brief Ecclesiastical history, containing most of the mutations which have befallen the Church, from the year of our Lord 97 unto the year 1603, as they have been showed unto St. John in Patmos, and recorded by such historiographers as are of least suspected faith  ToC  1605

Brightman, Thomas – The Revelation of St. John, illustrated with analysis and scholions, wherein the same is opened by the Scripture and the events of things foretold, showed by histories. Together with a most comfortable exposition of the last and most difficult part of the prophecy of Daniel.  Wherein the restoring of the Jews and their calling to the faith of Christ, after the utter overthrow of their three last enemies, is set forth in lively colors  d. 1607

Birghtman was a reformed puritan.

*  “Brightman’s admirers called him ‘the English Prophet,’ and this work they styled the ‘Apocalypse of the Apocalypse’; but it survives only as a noteworthy monument of the failure of the most learned to expound the mysteries of this book.  Elliott says ‘his Commentary is one of great vigor both in thought and language, and deservedly one of the most popular with the Protestant Churches of the time.'” – Spurgeon

Dent, Arthur – The Ruin of Rome: or, An Exposition upon the whole Revelation, wherein is plainly showed and proved that the popish religion, together with all the power and authority of Rome, shall ebb and decay more throughout all the churches of Europe…  d. 1607

Dent (1533-1607) was reformed and a puritan.

Broughton, Hugh – A Revelation of the Holy Apocalypse  1610

Broughton (1549-1612) was a reformed Anglican.

Forbes, Patrick – An Exquisite Commentary upon the Revelation of St. John, wherein both the course of the whole book, as also the more abstruse and hard places thereof not heretofore opened; are now at last most clearly and evidently explained  1613

Forbes (1564-1635) was reformed.

Bernard, Richard – A Key of Knowledge for the Opening of the Secret Mysteries of St. John’s Mystical Revelation  ToC  1617

Bernard was a reformed puritan.

Mason, Thomas – A Revelation of the Revelation, wherein is contained a most true, plain and brief manifestation of the meaning and scope of all the Revelation, and of every mystery of the same, whereby the Pope is most plainly declared and proved to be Antichrist  ToC  1619

Pareus, David – A Commentary upon the Divine Revelation of the Apostle and Evangelist John  d. 1622  

Guild, William – The Sealed Book Opened: or, a Clear Explication of the Prophecies of the Revelation. Together with the lessons that are to be observed from every chapter thereof, being clearly explained. Intended chiefly for the discovery to all of that Roman Antichrist, and that Rome’s final destruction is surely at hand, by that blessed work of reformation happily begun in the several churches and kingdoms of Europe  ToC  1656

Holland, Hezekiah – An Exposition, or short, but full, plain and perfect epitome of the most choice Commentaries upon the Revelation  1650

Holland was reformed.

Mede, Joseph

The Key of the Revelation, searched and demonstrated out of the natural and proper characters of the visions, with a comment thereupon, according to the rule of the same key, with a preface by Dr. Twisse  1643

This is Mede’s most famous work.

**  “There are several other works on the Apocalypse by this author, who, says Elliott, ‘was looked upon and written of as a man almost inspired for the solution of the Apocalyptic mysteries.  Yet I think his success was at first over-estimated as an Apocalyptic expositor.'” – Spurgeon

Remains on Some Passages in the Revelation  1650

Durham, James – A Learned and Complete Commentary upon the Book of the Revelation   EEBO  Buy  d. 1658

Durham (1622-58) was a Scottish covenanter and writes in the historicist school of interpretation, which was the nearly universal view of the Scottish covenanters, along with the Reformation and puritan era.

** – ‘After all that has been written, it would not be easy to find a more sensible and instructive work than this old-fashioned exposition.  We cannot accept its interpretations of the mysteries, but the mystery of the gospel fills it with sweet savor.’ – Spurgeon

Muggleton, Lodowick – A True Interpretation of all the chief texts and mysterious sayings and visions opened of the whole book of the Revelation of St. John whereby is unfolded and plainly declared those wonderful deep mysteries and visions interpreted concerning the true God, the alpha and omega, with variety of other heavenly secrets, which has never been opened nor revealed to any man since the creation of the world to this day, until now  ToC  1665

More, Henry – Apocalypsis Apocalypseos, or, The Revelation of St. John the Divine unveiled, containing a brief but perspicuous and continued exposition from chapter to chapter, and from verse to verse, of the whole book of the Apocalypse  1680

More (1614-1687) was an Arminian, Latitudinarian Anglican.

Poole, Matthew – Critical Synopsis of the Bible: Revelation, 3 vols.  Buy

This is different and much larger than Poole’s Annotations on Scripture.  Here Poole gives something of a history of interpretation (from Jewish writers until Christian interpreters of Poole’s own day) on every verse of the Bible.

‘…you will find in Poole’s Synopsis a marvelous collection of all the wisdom and folly of the critics.  It is a large cyclopedia worthy of the days when theologians could be cyclopean, and had not shrunk from folios to octavos.  Query—a query for which I will not demand an answer—has one of you beaten the dust from the venerable copy of Poole which loads our library shelves? 

Yet as Poole spent no less than ten years in compiling it, it should be worthy of your frequent notice—ten years, let me add, spent in Amsterdam in exile for the truth’s sake from his native land.  His work is based on an earlier compilation entitled Critic Sacri, containing the concentrated light of a constellation of learned men who have never been excelled in any age or country.’ – Spurgeon

A French Minister – A New System of the Apocalypse, or, Plain and Methodical Illustrations of all the visions in the Revelation of St. John written by a French minister in the year 1685 and finished but two days before the dragoons plundered him of all, except this treatise  1688

Knollys, Hanserd – An Exposition of the Whole Book of the Revelation  1689  255 pp.

Hanserd was a baptist.  The Great Whore of Revelation in ch. 17 is said to be the Papacy and all national Churches (Episcopal, presbyterian, etc.).

Cradock, Samuel – A Brief and Plain Exposition and Paraphrase of the Whole Book of the Revelation  1696

**  “Dr. Doddridge and Job Orton were very fond of this old author.  We are not.” – Spurgeon

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Revelation: Historicism – On the Major Prophetic Portions of Revelation

1600’s

Comenius, Johann – The Revelation Revealed, by Two Apocalyptical Treatises, showing: 1. How near the period of the time is wherein the mystery of God shall be fulfilled.  2. What things are already fulfilled, and what shall shortly follow thereupon, as they are foretold in the Revelation.  Translated out of High-Dutch  1651  Has introductory letters by Samuel Hartlib and John Dury.  This work especially treats of ch. 16.

Comenius was reformed, see Wiki.

Hayter, Richard – The Meaning of the Revelation, or, a Paraphrase with Questions on the Revelation of the Holy Apostle and Evangelist John the Divine in which the synchronisms of Mr. Joseph Mede, and the Expositions of other interpreters are called in question, and a new exposition given of the prophecies of the Revelation, never heard of before, nor extant in any author whatsoever, from the sixth chapter to the eighteenth, with variety of reasons for the exposition  1675

Hayter was a laymen of unknown theological persuasion.  See DNB.

Fleming, Robert – An Epistolary Discourse Concerning the Rise and Fall of Antichrist  1694  200 pp.

Fleming covers many of the chapters in Revelation and their interpretation in his Discourse.

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Revelation:  Historicism – Chapters in Revelation

Marlorate, Augustine – An Exposition of Revelation 1 & 13  d. 1560

Marlorat (1506-1562) was reformed.  His commentaries are particularly valuable as they are compendiums of block quotes from some of the best reformed divines of his day on the passages of that particular Biblical book.  See here for an excerpt from his commentary on John. 

**“Marlorate was an eminent French reformer, preacher and martyr.  His commentaries contain the cream of the older writers, and are in much esteem, but are very rare.  He wrote on the whole New Testament, but we have in English only the Gospels [2-3 John] and Jude [and Revelation 1 & 13].” – Spurgeon

Perkins, William – A Godly and Learned Exposition or Commentary upon the Three First chapters of the Revelation. Preached in Cambridge  1595

More, Henry – An Exposition of the Seven Epistles to the Seven churches together with a brief discourse of Idolatry, with application to the Church of Rome  1669

More (1614-1687) was an Arminian, Latitudinarian Anglican. 

Traheron, Bartholomew – An Exposition of the 4th Chapter of St. John’s Revelation… in sundry readings before his countrymen in Germany. Where in the providence of God is treated with an answer made to the objection of a gentle adversary  ToC  1558

Cowper, William – Patmos: A Commentary on the Revelation of St. John, chapters 4-7  1619

Cowper (1568-1619) was reformed.

**  “The simple piety and vigorous style of Cowper have preserved his old-fashioned work, and will preserve it.” – Spurgeon

Du Moulin, Pierre – The Prophecies contained in Rev. 1112, 13, 14, 17, 18and prophecies scattered throughout the Apocalypse speaking of the Pope and his seat  1613

Burton, Henry – The Sounding of the Two Last Trumpets, the sixth and seventh, or Meditations by way of Paraphrase upon the 9th, 10th, and 11th Chapters of the Revelation, as containing a prophecy of these last times  ToC  1641

Burton (1578-1648) was a reformed puritan. 

Guild, William – Antichrist… the Popes of Rome proven to be that Man of Sin…  1655  see chs. 4-6, 8, 11, 13-15 regarding Rev. 9, 13 & 17-18.

Herbert, William – A Letter Written by a True Christian Catholic, to a Roman pretended Catholic wherein upon occasion of controversy touching the Catholic Church the 12th, 13th, and 14th Chapters of the Revelation are briefly and truly expounded, which contain the true estate thereof, from the birth of Christ to the end of the world  1586

William Herbert (1553-1593).

Du Moulin, Pierre – The Prophecies contained in Rev. 1112, 13, 14, 17, 18and prophecies scattered throughout the Apocalypse speaking of the Pope and his seat  1613

Taylor, Thomas – Christ’s Victory over the Dragon: or Satan’s Downfall showing the glorious conquests of our Savior for his poor Church, against the greatest persecutors. In a plain and pithy exposition of the Twelfth chapter Revelation. Delivered in sundry lectures… Perfected and finished a little before his death  1632

Taylor (1576-1632) was a reformed puritan.

Marlorate, Augustine – An Exposition of Revelation 1 & 13  d. 1560

Marlorat (1506-1562) was reformed.  His commentaries are particularly valuable as they are compendiums of block quotes from some of the best reformed divines of his day on the passages of that particular Biblical book.  See here for an excerpt from his commentary on John. 

**“Marlorate was an eminent French reformer, preacher and martyr.  His commentaries contain the cream of the older writers, and are in much esteem, but are very rare.  He wrote on the whole New Testament, but we have in English only the Gospels [2-3 John] and Jude [and Revelation 1 & 13].” – Spurgeon

Wilkinson, John – An Exposition of the 13th chapter of the Revelation of Jesus Christ  ToC  1619

Cotton, John – An Exposition upon the 13th chapter of the Revelation  d. 1652

Cotton was one of the leading early New England puritans.  He was a historicist.

Guild, William – Antichrist… the Popes of Rome proven to be that Man of Sin…  1655  see chs. 4-6, 8, 11, 13-15 regarding Rev. 9, 13 & 17-18.

Burton, Henry – The Seven Vials or a Brief and Plain Exposition upon the 15th and 16th chapters of the Revelation, very pertinent and profitable for the Church of God in these last times  1628

Burton (1578-1648) was a reformed puritan. 

Cotton, John – The Pouring out of the Seven Vials, or, An Exposition, with Application of the 16th chapter of the Revelation  1642

Cotton was one of the leading early New England puritans.  He was a historicist.

Comenius, Johann – The Revelation Revealed, by Two Apocalyptical Treatises, showing: 1. How near the period of the time is wherein the mystery of God shall be fulfilled.  2. What things are already fulfilled, and what shall shortly follow thereupon, as they are foretold in the Revelation.  Translated out of High-Dutch  1651  Has introductory letters by Samuel Hartlib and John Dury.  This work especially treats of ch. 16.

Comenius was reformed, see Wiki.

Du Moulin, Pierre – The Prophecies contained in Rev. 1112, 13, 14, 17, 18, and prophecies scattered throughout the Apocalypse speaking of the Pope and his seat  1613

Guild, William – Antichrist… the Popes of Rome proven to be that Man of Sin…  1655  see chs. 4-6, 8, 11, 13-15 regarding Rev. 9, 13 & 17-18.

Baillie, Robert – On Rev. 20, ‘The Thousand Years of Christ’s Visible Reign
upon Earth, is Against Scripture’  1645  71 paragraphs, being ch. 11 of his Dissuasive from the Errors of the Time

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Related Pages

Bible Commentaries

Quotes on the Sincere Free Offer of the Gospel – 1500’s

Puritan Quotes on the Sincere Free Offer of the Gospel – 1600’s

The Westminster Assembly

The Westminster Assembly and Psalm Singing

The Puritans and Psalm Singing

Psalters Online