Contra Socialism, Communism, etc.

Much more will be added in the future

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Order of Contents

Article
Quotes
On the Limits of Exercising the Fullness of Civil Power unto Public Good

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Article

Rutherford, Samuel – Question 16: “Whether or not a Despotical and Masterly Dominion of Men and Things Agree to the King Because he is the King”  in Lex Rex  1646

Replace the word ‘king’ with ‘civil magistrate’ and this chapter is a masterly delineation of how Socialism (and many political ideas close thereto, rampant in the modern political scene) is contrary to natural law and the Word of God.  More importantly, read to learn what the various positive relations are by Creation between individuals, property, the State, the family, Scripture, etc.

Rutherford’s original context was arguing against the divine-right of kings, which held that kings implicitly owned all of their subjects and all of their property.  Rutherford demonstrates otherwise and sets forth the grounds of natural and Biblical political theory.

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Quotes

Samuel Rutherford

A Free Disputation  (1649), ch. 4, p. 50

“We hold with Lactantius that religion cannot be compelled, nor can mercy and justice and love to our neighbor commanded in the Second Table [of the Law], be more compelled than faith in Christ.”

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A Peaceable and Temperate Plea (1642), ch. 19, p. 307

“4. …In the art of painting, ye may abstract that which is moral from that which is artificial; but in a King as a King, there is nothing artificial, or which is to be abstracted from justice and piety; for all the acts of kingly authority as kingly, are moral acts of justice, and of piety in preserving both the Tables of the Law (if a King command a stratagem of war, that which is merely artificial is not from the King as King, but from a principle of military art in him, as an expert soldier)…”

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On the Limits of Exercising the Fullness of Civil Power unto the Public Good

Samuel Rutherford

Lex Rex…  (1644), p. 197

“5. [Henning] Arnisaeus [d. 1636, a German, Lutheran political writer] desires that kings may use sparingly the plenitude of their power for public good; there must be, says he, necessity to make it lawful to use the plenitude of their power justly; therefore Ahab sinned, in that he unjustly possessed Naboth’s vineyard…

but this plenitude of power may be justly put forth in act, says he, if the public good may be regarded.”

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Related Pages

Contra Libertarianism