Reformation & Puritan Bible Commentaries: the Poetic Books

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Reformation & Puritan Bible Commentaries

Bible Commentaries

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The Historical Books  ⇐  ⇒   The Prophets

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Subsections

Reformation & Puritan Commentaries on:

The Whole Bible, the Whole OT & Whole NT

Commentaries in Latin:

Whole Bible Commentaries

Whole Old Testament Commentaries

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Order of Contents

Job  15+
Psalms  20+
.       Individual Psalms  140+
Proverbs  12
Ecclesiastes  16+
Song of Solomon  30

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Job

1500’s

Calvin, John – Sermons on Job  d. 1564

***“Not the same as the commentary, but equally rich.” – Spurgeon

Beza, Theodore – Job Expounded, Partly in manner of a Commentary, partly in Manner of a Paraphrase  1589

** – “Beza was the great friend and assistant of Calvin.  As a commentator he lacked the profound insight and comprehensive grasp of Calvin, but as a critical scholar he is said to have been his equal if not his superior.  This work on Job is rare.” – Spurgeon

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1600’s

Caryl, Joseph

Exposition of Job  Buy

Ch. 1-3  EEBO
Ch. 4-7  EEBO
Ch. 8-10  EEBO
Ch. 11-14

Ch. 15-17  EEBO
Ch. 18-21
Ch. 22-26  EEBO
Ch. 27-31

Ch. 32-34  EEBO
Ch. 35-37  EEBO
Ch. 38-42  EEBO

Caryl was a Westminster divine.

*** – ‘Who can pretend to biblical learning who has not made himself familiar with the great writers who spent a life in explaining some one sacred book?  Caryl on Job will not exhaust the patience of a student who loves every letter of the Word.’  ‘Caryl must have inherited the patience of Job to have completed his stupendous task.  It would be a mistake to suppose that he is at all prolix or redundant; he is only full.  In the course of his expounding he has illustrated a very large portion of the whole Bible with great clearness and power.  He is deeply devotional and spiritual.  He gives us much, but none too much.  His work can scarcely be superseded or surpassed.’ – Spurgeon

An Exposition of Job: A one volume Abridgment  Buy

**“We do not believe in abridgments of a book which is good throughout.  think of twelve large volumes condensed into one small one!  An ox in a gallipot is nothing to it.” – Spurgeon

Hutcheson, George – An Exposition of the book of Job being the Sum of 316 Lectures  PoD  1657

*** – ‘Whenever the student sees a commentary by Hutcheson let him buy it, for we know of no author who is more thoroughly helpful to the minister of the Word.  He distills the text, and gives his readers the quintessence, ready for use.’ – Spurgeon

Leigh, Edward – Annotations upon the Book of Job  in Annotations on Five Poetical Books of the Old Testament: Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and Canticles  (1657)

**  ‘Good, brief notes.  Antique, but still prized.’ – Spurgeon

Durham, James – Job  HTML  Buy  †1658

*** – ‘This is a small book, and we have been unable to procure it.  [William] Orme [†1830] only mentions it upon the authority of Watt’s Bibliotheca.  It is certain to be good, for Durham is always admirable.’ – Surgeon

Jackson, Arthur – Annotations upon Job, the Psalms, the Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and the Song of Solomon  1658

“In 1653, Arthur Jackson, Preacher of God’s Word in Wood Street, London, issued four volumes upon the Old Testament, which appear to have been the result of his pulpit expositions to his people.  Valuable his works would be if there were no better, but they are not comparable to others already and afterwards mentioned.  You can do without him, but he is a reputable author.” – Spurgeon

Patrick, Simon – The Book of Job Paraphrased  (London [1679])

Patrick (1626-1707) was an Arminian, Latitudinarian Anglican bishop.

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Paraphrases & a Dialogue on Job

1600’s

Humfrey, Richard – The Conflict of Job, by Way of Dialogue.  Compiled for illustration, or opening of that great encounter: and may also serve as a paraphrase upon that heavenly work  (London, 1607)  235 pp.

We have been unable to find bio info on Humfrey, other than that he was English.

Abbot, George – The Whole Book of Job Paraphrased, or Made Easy for any to Understand 1640

Abbott (1604-1649) was an English, puritan, lay theologian and scholar who sat in the House of Commons. He was a friend of Richard Vines and Richard Baxter called Abbott “a dear friend”.

Senault, J.F. – Paraphrase on Job  1648  trans. from French

Senault (1599-1672) was a French, Romanist, Augustinian philosopher in Paris.

*  “Senault was a famous preacher of the Oratory in Paris, who, from the character of his works, would seem to have been almost a Protestant.  His writings were highly esteemed in their day, and translated into English.” – Spurgeon

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About Job

Humfrey, Richard – Job’s Piety, or, The Pattern of a Perfect Man, Containing an absolute history of all the excellencies which ought to be in a perfect man..Ref  (London, 1624)

We have been unable to find bio info on Humfrey, other than that he was English and wrote another work above on Job.

Anon. – The School of Patience, or the Benefit of Affliction to the People of God Set Forth in a Short Discourse of Two Great Examples of Patience: the one from the Example of Job the other from the Great Exemplar, Christ Jesus  (London, 1667)  28 pp.

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Chapters in Job

Chs. 1-2

Holland, Henry – An Exposition of Job 1-2  in The Christian Exercise of Fasting, private & public, plainly set forth by testimonies of Holy Scriptures, and also of old and late writers…  (London, 1596)

Holland (1556–1603) was a reformed, Anglican clergyman, known for his writing on witchcraft.

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Ch. 10

Dickson, David – An Exposition of the 10th Chapter of Job  d. 1662  75 pp.

Dickson was a leading Scottish covenanter.


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Psalms

1500’s

Luther, Martin 

Works  Buy

Vol. 10: First Lectures on the Psalms – 1-75
Vol. 11: First Lectures on the Psalms – 76-126
Vol. 12: Selected Psalms I
Vol. 13: Selected Psalms II
Vol. 14: Selected Psalms III

‘Commentary on Psalms 1-11’ & ‘Commentary on Psalms 12-22’ in Select Works of Luther, vol. 3  tr. Henry Cole, 1824

A Commentary upon the Fifteen Psalms, called ‘Psalms of Degrees’  d. 1546

A Manual of the Book of Psalms; or the Subject-contents of all the Psalms  tr. Henry Cole

**“Luther needs no trumpeter.”  “Fragmentary, a mere table of contents, but truly Lutheran.” – Spurgeon

Capito, Wolfgang – An Epitome of the Psalms, or Brief Meditations upon the same, with diverse other most Christian Prayers  1539

Strigel, Victor – Part of the Harmony of King David’s Harp, vol. 1 (1-21), 2 (22-35), 3 (45-61), 4 (62-67), 5 (68-72)  1582  tr. Richard Robinson.  Strigel only comments on the first half of the Psalms.

Strigel (1524-1569) was a Lutheran who later moved to Heidelberg and accepted the Reformed view of the Eucharist.

** “This volume the expositor is not at all likely to see, and there is, therefore, the less need for us to speak of it.  Strigellius was the friend of Luther and Melancthon, and a man of sound sense and vast learning.” – Spurgeon

Beza, Theodore – The Psalms of David Truly Opened and Explained by Paraphrasis according to the right sense of every psalm, with large and ample arguments before every psalm declaring the true sense thereof  1590  This also contains, at the end, an exposition, in the same manner, of 14 Bible songs from the Old and New Testaments

Wilcox, Thomas – A Very Godly and Learned Exposition upon the Whole Book of Psalms  1591  

Wilcox (c.1549-1608) was a reformed puritan.

**  ‘Very old.  the notes are brief, but furnish many hints for sermons.’  ‘Short spiritual remarks, followed by many doctrinal inferences, calculated to suggest topics to preachers.’ – Spurgeon

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1600’s

Bellarmine, Robert – Commentary on the Book of Psalms  Buy  1611

Bellarmine (1542-1621) was a prominent Roman Catholic divine and apologist.  For background to this work in English, see this dissertation.

**  “Popish, but marvelously good for a Cardinal.  He is frequently as evangelical as a Reformer.  He follows the [Latin] Vulgate text in this comment.” – Spurgeon

Ainsworth, Henry – Annotations upon the Five Books of Moses, the Book of the Psalms, and Song of Songs, or, Canticles, vol. 2, p. 408 ff.  d. 1622 

“Ainsworth was a celebrated scholar and an excellent divine.  His uncommon skill in Hebrew learning, and his excellent commentaries on the Scriptures are held in high reputation to this day.” – Brook’s Live of the Puritans

***“Thoroughly learned.  Though old, not out of date.” – Spurgeon

Dickson, David 

A Brief Explication of the Psalms 1-50, 51-100, 101-150  Buy  1653-4

Dickson was a prominent Scottish covenanter.

*** – ‘A rich volume, dropping fatness.  Invaluable to the preacher.  Having read and re-read it, we can speak of its holy savor and suggestiveness.  We commend it with much fervor.’ – Spurgeon

The Psalms of David in metre, with the annotations of the Rev. David Dickson  d. 1662

These are brief summary notes and applications prefixed to each psalm in the psalter.  Mainly for devotional use.  Note that the available print-on-demand versions of this work by Nabu Press are a spectacularly unreadable farce.  Do not waste your money on them.

Abbott, George – Brief Notes upon the Whole Book of Psalms  1651

Abbott (1604-1649) was a reformed Anglican.

**“An experimental exposition by a Member of Parliament under the Commonwealth.  Though not of the first order, many of his remarks are good.  Abbot was nephew to the Archbishop of the same name.” – Spurgeon

Ewart, J. – Lectures on the Psalms, vol. 1, 2, 3  mid-1600’s, published 1826

*  “The author was a Presbyterian Minister in the time of the Pretender [Charles II, in England, mid-1600’s], and we suspect that he was a high and dry Moderate.  His comments were given at the public reading of the Scriptures, and although destitute of spirituality and Gospel clearness, they are not without a measure of originality.” – Spurgeon

Leigh, Edward – Annotations on Five Poetical Books of the Old Testament: Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and Canticles  1657

**  ‘Good, brief notes.  Antique, but still prized.’ – Spurgeon

Jackson, Arthur – Annotations upon Job, the Psalms, the Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and the Song of Solomon  1658

“In 1653, Arthur Jackson, Preacher of God’s Word in Wood Street, London, issued four volumes upon the Old Testament, which appear to have been the result of his pulpit expositions to his people.  Valuable his works would be if there were no better, but they are not comparable to others already and afterwards mentioned.  You can do without him, but he is a reputable author.” – Spurgeon

Hammond, Henry – A Paraphrase and Annotations upon the Psalms, as also upon the Ten First Chapters of the) Proverbs  1684  d. 1660

Hammond was an Arminian, Latitudinarian Anglican.  Nonetheless Matthew Henry was able to quote from him often.

** “Much esteemed, and deservedly so.  Hammond’s weighty tome is somewhat dry, and many of his remarks are rather those of a linguist than of a divine, but he touches on many matters which others omit, and is, upon the whole, an expositor of singular merit.”  – Spurgeon

Wright, Abraham – A Practical Commentary, wherein the Text of every Psalm is practically expounded according to the Doctrine of the Catholic Church, in a way not usually trod by commentators  1661

**“Wright selects the more remarkable verses, and comments on them in a deeply spiritual, quaint and suggestive manner.  His work is extremely rare.” – Spurgeon

Nicholson, William – David’s Harp Strung and Tuned; or, an Easy Analysis of the Whole Book of Psalms  1662

Nicholson (1591-1672) was a reformed Anglican.

“Wholly practical and explanatory.  In his explication the author steers between the two extremes of literal and spiritual interpretation.  Dr. Adam Clark has inserted Bishop Nicholson’s Analysis in his commentary on the Psalms, omitting his prayers.” – Horne

** – “This book fetches a high price when complete, and we cannot advise a poor man to lay out so much money upon it, good as it is.” – Spurgeon

Bythner, Victor – The Lyre of David, or, an Analysis of the Psalms, Critical and Practical  Latin  d. 1670

Bythner (1605-1670) was reformed.  

*** – “We agree with the statement found in the Preface of this work: ‘Nearly two centuries have passed away, since Bythner, uncertain of its reception, first committed his Lyra to public light; during which time, instead of sinking, it has advanced in estimation; being admitted by all the learned to be the very best work on the Psalms in Hebrew.  The number of Hebrew radical words is 1867; of these, 1184 occur in the Psalms; it follows then, that a thorough knowledge of the language, and that Bythner’s Lyra, in being the best work on the Psalms, must be the best work on Hebrew in general.’  Our readers will scarcely need us to add that Bythner’s work is only useful to those who study the Hebrew.” – Spurgeon

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Prayers Based on the Psalms

Vermigli, Peter Martyr – Most Godly Prayers Compiled out of David’s Psalms  (London, 1569)


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On Numerous Individual Psalms

1500’s

Cope, Anthony – A Godly Meditation upon 20 Select and Chosen Psalms of the Prophet David  1547  On Psalms 1, 6, 13, 23, 32, 51, 73, 84, 90, 102, 103, 104, 116, 121, 130, 139 & 146.

Cope (c.1486–1551) was an English author.

*  “More curious than valuable.  The style is scholastic and pointless.” – Spurgeon

Rollock, Robert – An Exposition upon some Select Psalms of David  d. 1599

Including expositions of 15 Psalms: 3, 6, 16, 23, 32, 39, 42, 49, 51, 62, 65, 84, 116, 130, 137

** “Rollock’s works are rare.  He wrote in Latin, and his language is made more dull than need be by the translator.  All his writings are masterly.” – Spurgeon

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1600’s

Boys, John – An Exposition of the Proper Psalms used in our English liturgy, together with a reason why the Church did choose the same  1616

Boys (1571-1625) was a reformed Anglican, who was the Dean of Canterbury.  

*** – “One of the richest of writers.  From his golden pen flows condensed wisdom.  Many of his sentences are worthy to be quoted as gems of the Christian classics.” – Spurgeon

Baker, Richard – Meditations and Disquisitions upon the First Psalm; the Penitential Psalms; and the Seven Consolatory Psalms  1645

This work includes commentary on Psalm 1,6,23,27,30,32,34,38,51,84,102,103,116,130 & 143.

***  “O rare Sir Richard Baker!  Knight of the flowing pen.  His ‘Meditations and Disquisitions’ are altogether marrow and fatness.  We have often tried to quote from him and have found ourselves so embarrassed with riches that we have been inclined to copy the whole book.  Why it has not been reprinted, and made to pass through fifty editions, we cannot tell.  Poor man, he became a surety and smarted, dying in poverty in the Fleet.  Were there any Christians alive in those days?”  – Spurgeon

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Expositions of the Penitential Psalms:  6, (25), 32, 38, 51, 102, 130, 143

1500’s

Fisher, John – Commentary on the Seven Penitential Psalms, vol. 1 (6, 32, 38, 51), 2  (102, 130, 143)  1509  (the numbering of the psalms is one number different in the table of contents, due to a different counting)

Fisher (1469-1535) was a Roman Catholic.

* – “Dry and tedious: in the stiff antique style.” – Spurgeon

Beza, Theodore – Christian Meditations upon Eight Psalms of the Prophet David  1582

On Psalms 1, 6, 32, 38, 51, 102, 130, 143.

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1600’s

Hayward, John – David’s Tears  (on Ps. 6, 32, 130)  1623

** – “After the Puritanic method: full of point and pith.” – Spurgeon

Donne, John – ‘Sermons on the Penitential Psalms’, Works, vol. 2 (6, 32:1-6), 3 (32:7-11, 51)  d. 1631

*** “A right royal writer, whose every line is a pearl.” – Spurgeon

Simson, Archibald – Exposition on the Seven Psalms of Repentance  PoD  1638

Simson was a Scottish minister.  Includes expositions of: Ps. 6, 25, 32, 38, 51, 130, 143

*** – ‘A marrowy author, full of instruction.’ – Spurgeon

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Psalms 1-8

Day, John – Day’s Descant on David’s Psalms: or a Commentary upon the Psalter…  first, of the first Eight Psalms…  (Oxford, 1620)

Day (1566–1628) was a reformed Anglican minister and had a reputation at one point for being ‘the most frequent and noted preacher in the university’ of Oxford.

Anon. – A Discourse Presented to Those who Seek the Reformation of the Church of England, wherein is showed that the New Church Discipline [of Independency] is Dangerous both to Religion and also to the whole State: together with the opinions of certain reverend and learned divines concerning the fundamental points of the true Protestant Religion: with a short Exposition upon some of David’s Psalms pertinent to these times of Sedition  ([London] 1642)

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Psalm 1

1500’s

Beza, Theodore – Christian Meditations upon Eight Psalms of the Prophet David  Including a meditation on Psalm 1

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1600’s

Stoneham, Mathew – A Treatise on the First Psalm  1610

Stoneham was an English minister in Norwich.

** – “Somewhat dry, scholastic and out of date; but still an interesting and instructive piece of old divinity.” – Spurgeon

Fletcher, Phineas – The Way to Blessedness, a Treatise, or Commentary, on the First Psalm  1632

Smith, Samuel – David’s Blessed Man: a Short Exposition on the First Psalm, directing a man to True Happiness  9th ed. 1635

** “Very popular in its day, and worthily so.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 4

Horton, Thomas – Choice and Practical Expositions on Four Select Psalms: 4, 42, 51, 63  Buy  1675

***“A marvelous homiletical exposition.  Horton’s discourses are very full of divisions, but then he always has plenty of solid matter to divide.  Ministers will find teeming suggestions here.” – Spurgeon

Leighton, Robert – Meditations Practical and Critical on Ps. 4   Buy  †1684  in Works, vol. 2

***“Everything that fell from his pen is worth its weight in diamonds.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 6   (See also Expositions of the Penitential Psalms Above)

Knox, John – An Exposition upon the Sixth Psalm of David, Addressed to Mrs. Bowes  1554  in Works, 3:111-156

Du Vair, Guillaume – A Most Heavenly & Plentiful Treasure, or a Rich Mineral Full of Sweetest Comforts…  (London, 1609)  including meditations on Psalms 6, 15, 26, 31, 34, 37, 43, 46, 50, 73, 102, 129, 142

Du Vair (1556-1621) was a French Romanist and lawyer.

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Psalm 8

Luther, Martin – A Sermon of Dr. Martin Luther, of the Kingdom of Christ, out of the Eighth Psalm, ‘Lord our Lord, etc.’, made at Marsburg the Sixth Day of Aug., Anno 1545  in A Fruitful & Godly Exposition and Declaration of the Kingdom of Christ and of the Christian Liberty...  ([London, 1548])

Leighton, Robert – Meditations Practical and Critical on Ps. 8   Buy  †1684  in Works, vol. 2

***“Everything that fell from his pen is worth its weight in diamonds.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 15

1500’s

Erasmus, Desiderus – An Exposition of Psalm 15 in which is full purely declared the pure and clean behavior that ought to be in the pure Church of Christ, which is the multitude of all true Christen people  d. 1536

Aepinus, Johann – A Very Fruitful & Godly Exposition upon the 15th Psalm of David called, ‘Lord, who shall dwell in thy tabernacle’  ([London, 1548])

Aepinus (1499-1553) was a German Lutheran theologian and a presiding spiritual leader over the Lutheran State Church of Hamburg.

Turnbull, Richard – An Exposition upon the 15th Psalm, divided into Four Sermons  1592

Turnbull (d. 1593) was a fellow of Oxford and a reformed minister in London.

** “By a popular and edifying preacher of the olden times.” – Spurgeon

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1600’s

Downame, George – Lectures on the 15th Psalm, wherein besides many other very profitable and necessary matters, the question of usury is plainly and fully decided  1604

** – “Lectures by one of the race of giant divines.” – Spurgeon

Du Vair, Guillaume – A Most Heavenly & Plentiful Treasure, or a Rich Mineral Full of Sweetest Comforts…  (London, 1609)  including meditations on Psalms 6, 15, 26, 31, 34, 37, 43, 46, 50, 73, 102, 129, 142

Du Vair (1556-1621) was a French Romanist and lawyer.

Cartwright, Christopher –A Practical and Polemical Commentary or Exposition on the Whole 15th Psalm  1658

** “A learned and weighty work; not readily met with.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 16

Greenham, Richard – A Godly Exposition of the 16th Psalm  d. 1591

See Spurgeon’s comments on his work on Ps. 119.

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Psalm 20

Bownd, Nicholas – Medicines for the Plague, that is, Godly and Fruitful Sermons upon part of the 20th Psalm, full of instructions and comfort: very fit generally for all times of affliction, but more particularly applied to this late visitation of the plague  Buy  1604  being 21 sermons on verses 1-6

** – “Racy, quaint, extremely rare.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 22

Luther, Martin – ‘A Very Excellent & Sweet Exposition upon the 22nd Psalm of David, Called in Latin, Dominus Regit Me, etc.’  trans. Miles Coverdale  ([Southwarke, 1538])

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Psalm 23

1500’s

Hooper, John – Certain Comfortable Expositions of Bishop Hooper written in the time of his Tribulation and Imprisonment, upon Psalms 23, 62, 73, and 77  d. 1555

Hooper was one of the English martyrs during the time of Bloody Mary.

* – “The cramped style and antiquated matter repel the reader.” – Spurgeon

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1600’s

Smith, Samuel – The Chief Shepherd; or an Exposition on the 23rd Psalm  1625

**“All the writings of Samuel Smith are good, but not so full of memorable sentences and pithy sayings as certain others of their date.” – Spurgeon

Sedgwick, Obadiah – The Shepherd of Israel, or God’s Pastoral Care over his People, delivered in diverse sermons on the whole Twenty-Third Psalm  1658

Sedgwick was an English puritan and Westminster divine.

** “Sedgwick was one of the most eminent preachers of the time of the Commonwealth.  His commenting is solid and lively.” – Spurgeon

Baker, Richard – ‘Psalm 23’ in Meditations and Disquisitions upon the First Psalm; the Penitential Psalms; and the Seven Consolatory Psalms, pp. 305-320  1645

***  “O rare Sir Richard Baker!  Knight of the flowing pen.  His ‘Meditations and Disquisitions’ are altogether marrow and fatness.  We have often tried to quote from him and have found ourselves so embarrassed with riches that we have been inclined to copy the whole book.  Why it has not been reprinted, and made to pass through fifty editions, we cannot tell.  Poor man, he became a surety and smarted, dying in poverty in the Fleet.  Were there any Christians alive in those days?”  – Spurgeon

Renwick, James – Lecture on Ps. 23  Buy  †1688  23 paragraphs

Renwick was the last Scottish covenanter martyr in Scotland.

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Psalm 24

Boys, John – Psalm 24  1629 in Works

Boys (1571-1625) was a reformed Anglican, who was the Dean of Canterbury.  

*** – “One of the richest of writers.  From his golden pen flows condensed wisdom.  Many of his sentences are worthy to be quoted as gems of the Christian classics.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 25   (See also Expositions of the Penitential Psalms Above)

Mossom, Robert – The Preacher’s Tripartite in Three Books: The First to Raise Devotion in Divine Meditations upon Psalm 25…  Buy  1657

*** “Thoroughly devotional, eminently consolatory, and deeply experimental.  Mossom is a fruitful writer.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 26

Du Vair, Guillaume – A Most Heavenly & Plentiful Treasure, or a Rich Mineral Full of Sweetest Comforts…  (London, 1609)  including meditations on Psalms 6, 15, 26, 31, 34, 37, 43, 46, 50, 73, 102, 129, 142

Du Vair (1556-1621) was a French Romanist and lawyer.

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Psalm 27

Pierson, Thomas – Excellent Encouragements Against Afflictions, containing David’s Triumph over Distress on Ps. 27  d. 1633

**“Pierson was not the richest or most overflowing of the old divines, but yet one who stood in the front rank.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 31

1400’s

Savonarola, Girolamo – ‘A Meditation upon the 31st Psalm’  in A Pithy Exposition upon the 51st Psalm entitled, Miserere Mei Deus, etc.  Also a godly meditation upon the 31st Psalm, entitled, In Te Domine Speraui…  ed. Abraham Fleming  (d. 1498; London, 1578)

Savonarola (1452-1498) was an Italian, Dominican Friar and preacher who was a reforming Romanist before the Reformation. 

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1600’s

Du Vair, Guillaume – A Most Heavenly & Plentiful Treasure, or a Rich Mineral Full of Sweetest Comforts…  (London, 1609)  including meditations on Psalms 6, 15, 26, 31, 34, 37, 43, 46, 50, 73, 102, 129, 142

Du Vair (1556-1621) was a French Romanist and lawyer.

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Psalm 32   (See also Expositions of the Penitential Psalms Above)

Blake, David – An Exposition upon the Thirty Two Psalm, Describing the True Manner of Humbling and Raising up of God’s Children  (Edinburgh, 1600)

Taylor, Thomas – David’s Learning, or The Way to True Happiness in a Commentary upon the 32nd Psalm  1617

**“On account of Taylor’s great knowledge of the Scriptures, he was commonly called ‘the illuminated Doctor.’  Fuller calls him ‘a grave divine, a painful preacher, and a profitable writer.’  He is one of the richest in matter of all the Puritans.” – Spurgeon

Leighton, Robert – Meditations Practical and Critical on Ps. 32   Buy  †1684  in Works, vol. 2

***“Everything that fell from his pen is worth its weight in diamonds.” – Spurgeon

Willard, Samuel – The Truly Blessed Man: or, The Way to be Happy Here, and Forever: being the Substance of Divers sermons preached on Psalm 32  1700

**“One of the first books printed in the United States.  An old-fashioned exposition.  The price is caused by its rarity rather than its value.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 34

Du Vair, Guillaume – A Most Heavenly & Plentiful Treasure, or a Rich Mineral Full of Sweetest Comforts…  (London, 1609)  including meditations on Psalms 6, 15, 26, 31, 34, 37, 43, 46, 50, 73, 102, 129, 142

Du Vair (1556-1621) was a French Romanist and lawyer.

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Psalm 37

Du Vair, Guillaume – A Most Heavenly & Plentiful Treasure, or a Rich Mineral Full of Sweetest Comforts…  (London, 1609)  including meditations on Psalms 6, 15, 26, 31, 34, 37, 43, 46, 50, 73, 102, 129, 142

Du Vair (1556-1621) was a French Romanist and lawyer.

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Psalm 38

  See the Expositions of the Penitential Psalms Above

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Psalm 39

Leighton, Robert – Meditations Practical and Critical on Ps. 39   Buy  †1684  in Works, vol. 2

***“Everything that fell from his pen is worth its weight in diamonds.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 40

Bruce, Robert – Sermon on Ps. 40  1617  from his The Way to True Peace and Rest

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Psalm 42

Bloyse, William – Meditations upon the 42nd Psalm  (London, 1632)

Bloyse was an esquire (lawyer).

Sibbes, Richard – The Soul’s Conflict and Victory over itself by Faith  1635 in Works, vol. 1

*** “Mainly upon verses 5 and 11.  Sibbes never wastes the student’s time; he scatters pearls and diamonds with both hands.” – Spurgeon

Horton, Thomas – Choice and Practical Expositions on Four Select Psalms: 4, 42, 51, 63  Buy  1675

***“A marvelous homiletical exposition.  Horton’s discourses are very full of divisions, but then he always has plenty of solid matter to divide.  Ministers will find teeming suggestions here.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 43

Du Vair, Guillaume – A Most Heavenly & Plentiful Treasure, or a Rich Mineral Full of Sweetest Comforts…  (London, 1609)  including meditations on Psalms 6, 15, 26, 31, 34, 37, 43, 46, 50, 73, 102, 129, 142

Du Vair (1556-1621) was a French Romanist and lawyer.

Boys, John – An Exposition of the Proper Psalms used in our English liturgy, together with a reason why the Church did choose the same  1616

Boys (1571-1625) was a reformed Anglican, who was the Dean of Canterbury.  

*** – “One of the richest of writers.  From his golden pen flows condensed wisdom.  Many of his sentences are worthy to be quoted as gems of the Christian classics.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 45

Willet, Andrew – A Treatise of Solomon’s Marriage [Ps. 45:10-16]  1613

Boys, John – An Exposition of the Proper Psalms used in our English liturgy, together with a reason why the Church did choose the same  1616

Boys (1571-1625) was a reformed Anglican, who was the Dean of Canterbury.  

*** – “One of the richest of writers.  From his golden pen flows condensed wisdom.  Many of his sentences are worthy to be quoted as gems of the Christian classics.” – Spurgeon

Troughton, William – The Mystery of the Marriage Song  1656  

Troughton (c.1613-c.1686) was a reformed puritan.

*  “An old work with nothing new or striking in it.  Remarkably tame and meagre for a work of that exuberant period.  Let it alone.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 46

Du Vair, Guillaume – A Most Heavenly & Plentiful Treasure, or a Rich Mineral Full of Sweetest Comforts…  (London, 1609)  including meditations on Psalms 6, 15, 26, 31, 34, 37, 43, 46, 50, 73, 102, 129, 142

Du Vair (1556-1621) was a French Romanist and lawyer.

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Psalm 50

Du Vair, Guillaume – A Most Heavenly & Plentiful Treasure, or a Rich Mineral Full of Sweetest Comforts…  (London, 1609)  including meditations on Psalms 6, 15, 26, 31, 34, 37, 43, 46, 50, 73, 102, 129, 142

Du Vair (1556-1621) was a French Romanist and lawyer.

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Psalm 51

1500’s

Luther, Martin – ‘Commentary on Ps. 51’ in Select Works of Luther, vol. 3  tr. Henry Cole, 1824 

**“Luther needs no trumpeter.” – Spurgeon

Anonymous – Meditation of a Penitent Sinner, written in the manner of a paraphrase upon the 51st Psalm of David  d. 1564  In poetry

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1600’s

Estye, George – ‘An Exposition upon the Fifty & One Psalm’  in A Most Sweet & Comfortable Exposition upon the Ten Commandments and upon the 51st Psalm, as they were delivered in short notes…  (London, 1602)

Estye (c.1560-1601) was a reformed Anglican clergyman.

Page, Samuel – David’s Broken Heart, or, An Exposition upon the Whole Fifty-first Psalm  EEBO  d. 1603

Page was an Anglican.

***“Every page is like a bank note for value.  Here are homiletical materials in abundance.” – Spurgeon

Cowper, William – Good News from Canaan, Full of Heavenly Comfort and Consolation, for all those that are afflicted either in body or mind, with a proof of true repentance for the same  (London, 1613)  being a commentary on
Ps. 51

Cowper (1568-1619) was a reformed, Scottish bishop of Galloway.

Hieron, Samuel – David’s Penitential Psalm Opened in 30 Several Lectures Thereon  1617

** – “Hieron [1572-1617] was a conforming Puritan.  His works were once exceedingly popular and they are still esteemed.” – Spurgeon

Smith, Samuel – David’s Repentance, or, A Plain and Familiar Exposition of the 51st Psalm  GB  d. 1632

** – “It will be seen from the numerous editions that his work was well received in its author’s lifetime.  He tells us that he spent the spare hours of a long sickness in publishing this short exposition, and thus the world is all the healthier for his illness.” – Spurgeon

Hildersham, Arthur – One Hundred and Fifty-Two Lectures upon Psalm 51  (London, 1635)

*** “Hildersham was one of the most tried of the Nonconforming ministers, and at the same time one of the most able.  He is copious and discursive, we had almost said long-winded.  Both Willet and Preston speak of him in the highest terms.” – Spurgeon

Barford, John – Paraphrastical Meditations upon Isaiah 55 & Psalm 51…  (1649)

Horton, Thomas – Choice and Practical Expositions on Four Select Psalms: 4, 42, 51, 63  Buy  1675

***“A marvelous homiletical exposition.  Horton’s discourses are very full of divisions, but then he always has plenty of solid matter to divide.  Ministers will find teeming suggestions here.” – Spurgeon

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Romanists on Ps. 51

1400’s

Savonarola, Girolamo – ‘An Exposition, After the Manner of a Contemplation, upon the Psalm 51, called Miserere Mei Deus  in A Pithy Exposition upon the 51st Psalm entitled, Miserere Mei Deus, etc.  Also a godly meditation upon the 31st Psalm, entitled, In Te Domine Speraui…  ed. Abraham Fleming  (d. 1498; London, 1578)

Savonarola (1452-1498) was an Italian, Dominican Friar and preacher who was a reforming Romanist before the Reformation. 

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1600’s

Kellison, Matthew – Paraphrastical & Devout Discourses upon the Psalm, Miserere  (Douai, 1635)

Kellison (c.1560-1642) was an English, Romanist.

Cross, Nicholas – The Cynosura, or a Saving Star that Leads to Eternity Discovered amidst the celestial Orbs of David’s Psalms, by way of Paraphrase upon the Miserere  (London, 1670)

Cross (1616–1698) was an English Romanist and Franciscan friar.

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Psalm 62

Hooper, John – Certain Comfortable Expositions of Bishop Hooper written in the time of his Tribulation and Imprisonment, upon Psalms 23, 62, 73, and 77  d. 1555

Hooper was one of the English martyrs during the time of Bloody Mary.

* – “The cramped style and antiquated matter repel the reader.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 63

Horton, Thomas – Choice and Practical Expositions on Four Select Psalms: 4, 42, 51, 63  Buy  1675

***“A marvelous homiletical exposition.  Horton’s discourses are very full of divisions, but then he always has plenty of solid matter to divide.  Ministers will find teeming suggestions here.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 66

Larke, Nicholas – An Exposition of the Sixty-Six Psalm, by Doctrine & Exhortation  (London, 1622)

We do not have any bio info on Larke, but the exposition looks good.

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Psalm 67

Boys, John –Deus Misereatur [God be merciful], the 67th Psalm’   1629 in Works

Boys (1571-1625) was a reformed Anglican, who was the Dean of Canterbury.  

*** – “One of the richest of writers.  From his golden pen flows condensed wisdom.  Many of his sentences are worthy to be quoted as gems of the Christian classics.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 73

1500’s

Hooper, John – Certain comfortable expositions of Bishop Hooper written in the time of his Tribulation and Imprisonment, upon Psalms 23, 62, 73, and 77  d. 1555

Hooper was one of the English martyrs during the time of Bloody Mary.

* – “The cramped style and antiquated matter repel the reader.” – Spurgeon

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1600’s

Du Vair, Guillaume – A Most Heavenly & Plentiful Treasure, or a Rich Mineral Full of Sweetest Comforts…  (London, 1609)  including meditations on Psalms 6, 15, 26, 31, 34, 37, 43, 46, 50, 73, 102, 129, 142

Du Vair (1556-1621) was a French Romanist and lawyer.

Parry, Edward – David Restored; or an Antidote against the Prosperity of the Wicked and the Afflictions of the Just  1660

**“Not super-excellent, nor free from blemishes, but containing much of sterling value.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 76

Bruce, Robert – 2 Sermons on Ps. 76  1617  from his The Way to True Peace and Rest

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Psalm 77

Hooper, John – Certain comfortable expositions of Bishop Hooper written in the time of his Tribulation and Imprisonment, upon Psalms 23, 62, 73, and 77  d. 1555

Hooper was one of the English martyrs during the time of Bloody Mary.

* – “The cramped style and antiquated matter repel the reader.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 79

Dunster, John – Prodromus. Or The Literal Destruction of Jerusalem as it is Described in the 79th Psalm…  (London, 1613)

Dunster was an English protestant.  See the dedication at the front and the ‘To the Reader’ at the end for more context.

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Psalm 80

Savonarola, Girolamo – Another Meditation of the Same Hieronimus Savanorola upon the 80th Psalm of David  ([Emden, 1555])

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Psalm 82

Hall, Thomas – The Beauty of Magistracy, and Exposition of Psalm 82 in Swinnock’s Works, vol. 4, pp. 147-300

**“This exposition has always nestled in the bosom of Swinnock’s works.  We agree with Dr. Jenkyn’s criticism: ‘The style is terse and clear, though grave and theological, and the matter is solid and judicious.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 83

Cradock, Walter – ‘Expositions & Observations on Psalm 83’  in Divine Drops Distilled from the Fountain of Holy Scriptures: delivered in several exercises before sermons, upon Twenty and Three Texts of Scripture  (London, 1650)

Cradock was an Independent, reformed minister.

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Psalm 84

1500’s

Hemmingsen, Neils – The Faith of the Church Militant, Most effectually described in this exposition of the 84th Psalm  1581

Hemmingsen was a Lutheran.

* “A Danish divine of high repute in his own day.  Some of his works were turned into English; but the translations, like the originals, are now left in undeserved oblivion.” – Spurgeon

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1600’s

Pierson, Thomas – Excellent Encouragements Against Afflictions, containing David’s Heart’s Desire on Ps. 84  d. 1633

**“Pierson was not the richest or most overflowing of the old divines, but yet one who stood in the front rank.” – Spurgeon

Freake, William – The Privileges of the Upright in Heart, Expressed in Brief Meditations upon the 84th Psalm: and More Particularly Upon the 11th Verse Thereof  (London, 1639)

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Psalm 85

Pierson, Thomas – Excellent Encouragements Against Afflictions, containing the Church’s Exercise under Affliction on Ps. 85  d. 1633

**“Pierson was not the richest or most overflowing of the old divines, but yet one who stood in the front rank.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 87

Rhegius, Urbanus – The Solace of Zion & Joy of Jerusalem. Or Consolation of God’s Church in the Latter Age, Redeemed by the preaching of the Gospel Universally.  Being a Godly and Learned Exposition of the 87th Psalm of the princely prophet David…  (London, 1587)

Rhegius (1489–1541)  was a Protestant Reformer who was active both in Northern and Southern Germany in order to promote Lutheran unity in the Holy Roman Empire.  He was also a popular poet.  Luther referred to him as the “Bishop of Lower Saxony”.

Rhegius began to support the Reform movement in 1521 (having succeeded Johannes Oecolampadius in Augsburg) and became an arbitor between the different views on the Eucharist expressed by Luther and Zwingli.  In 1530 he was one of the collaborators (along with Luther and others) who created the Augsburg Confession.

Pierson, Thomas – Excellent Encouragements Against Afflictions, containing the Great Charter of the Church on Ps. 87  d. 1633

**“Pierson was not the richest or most overflowing of the old divines, but yet one who stood in the front rank.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 90

Smith, Samuel – Moses, his Prayer, or an Exposition of the 90th Psalm…  1656

** See Spurgeon’s notes on his works on Ps. 1 & 51.

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Psalm 91

1500’s

Luther, Martin – ‘A Sermon Out of the Psalm, Qui habitat, etc. how and unto what place a Christen man ought to fly the horrible plague of the pestilence’  in A Very Excellent & Sweet Exposition upon the 22nd Psalm of David, Called in Latin, Dominus Regit Me, etc. trans. Miles Coverdale  ([Southwarke, 1538])

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1600’s

T.C. – A Godly & Learned Sermon upon the 91st Psalm, Declaring how, and to what place, a Christian man ought to fly in the Dangerous Time of the Pestilence, for his best Safety & Deliverance…  whereunto are joined certain fruitful prayers very necessary for the time of Infection  (1603)

Horne, Robert – The Shield of the Righteous: or the Ninety-First Psalm Expounded, with the addition of doctrines and uses. Very necessary and Comfortable in these Days of heaviness, wherein the pestilence rages so sore in London and other parts of this kingdom  (London, 1625)

Horne (1565–1640) was an Oxford scholar and an Anglican chaplain.

Bridge, William – The Refuge: Containing the Righteous Man’s Habitation in the Time of Plague & Pestilence, being a Brief Exposition of the 91st Psalm  d. 1671  EEBO

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Psalm 92

Cameron, Richard – Lecture on Ps. 92  Buy  †1680  6 pp., from Sermons in the Time of Persecution

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Psalm 95

Boys, John – Venite Exultemus Domino [‘Oh Come Let us Exult the Lord’ on Ps. 95]    1629 in Works

Boys (1571-1625) was a reformed Anglican, who was the Dean of Canterbury.  

*** – “One of the richest of writers.  From his golden pen flows condensed wisdom.  Many of his sentences are worthy to be quoted as gems of the Christian classics.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 98

Boys, John – Psalms in the Evening Office: Ps. 98    1629 in Works

Boys (1571-1625) was a reformed Anglican, who was the Dean of Canterbury.  

*** – “One of the richest of writers.  From his golden pen flows condensed wisdom.  Many of his sentences are worthy to be quoted as gems of the Christian classics.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 100

Boys, John – ‘Jubilate Deo, Ps. 100’    1629 in Works

Boys (1571-1625) was a reformed Anglican, who was the Dean of Canterbury.  

*** – “One of the richest of writers.  From his golden pen flows condensed wisdom.  Many of his sentences are worthy to be quoted as gems of the Christian classics.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 101

Pigg, Oliver – Sermons upon the 101st Psalm, containing profitable instruction for all, especially for such as have any government over others  (London, 1591)

Pigg (fl. 1580) was an English puritan clergyman in the Church of England.

de Mornay, Philippe – Meditations upon Ps. 101…  and by him dedicated to Henry the Fourth, the French King  (London, 1599)

Horne, Robert – The Christian governor in the commonwealth, and private families described by David, in his 101st Psalm, Guiding all men in a right course to heaven  1614

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Psalm 102

See the also Expositions of the Penitential Psalms Above

Du Vair, Guillaume – A Most Heavenly & Plentiful Treasure, or a Rich Mineral Full of Sweetest Comforts…  (London, 1609)  including meditations on Psalms 6, 15, 26, 31, 34, 37, 43, 46, 50, 73, 102, 129, 142

Du Vair (1556-1621) was a French Romanist and lawyer.

Fenwicke, John – Zion’s Joy in her King coming in his glory. Wherein, the estate of the poor distressed Church of the Gentiles (travailing in the wilderness towards the new Jerusalem of the Jews) in her utmost extremities, and height of her joys, is lively delineated; in some mediations upon that prophetical Psalm 102…  (London, 1643)

Fenwicke (c. 1570 – c. 1658) was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons and supported Parliament during the civil war, when this work was written.

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Psalm 103

Sterne, Richard – A Brief Commentary upon the 103rd Psalm with the Several Axioms or Doctrines Therein Contained, and Uses Thereupon Inferred  (London, 1649)

‘To the Reader’:  “These notes upon this entire Psalm were by a reverend divine of pious memory, left behind him, penned in the Latin tongue.  They were to him as the groundwork whereupon he built his larger discourses.”

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Psalm 107

Hyperius, Andreas – A Special Treatise of God’s Providence and of Comforts against all kind of crosses and calamities to be drawn from the same. With an exposition of the 107th Psalm  1588  d. 1564

PRDL lists Hyperius as Reformed.

** – “This author has written in Latin upon many subjects, but his works are now little known.  He was a learned Lutheran.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 110

Abbot, Robert – The Exaltation of the Kingdom & Priesthood of Christ. In certain Sermons upon the 110th Psalm…  (1596; London, 1601)

Abbot (1560-1617) was a reformed, Anglican clergyman and academic, known as a polemical writer. 

Reynolds, Edward – Explication of the 110th Psalm  1632

***“Surpassingly clear and elaborate.  Reynolds was a man of vast learning and thoroughly evangelical in spirit.” – Spurgeon

Gorton, Samuel – An Incorruptible Key Composed of the 110th Psalm, wherewith you may Open the Rest of the Holy Scriptures  (London, 1647)

Gorton (1593–1677) was an early settler and civic leader of the Colony of Rhode Island.  He had some strong, erroneous religious beliefs which differed from Puritan theology and was very outspoken, and he became the leader of a small sect of converts known as Gortonists or Gortonites.  As a result, he was frequently in trouble with the civil and church authorities in the New England colonies.

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Psalm 111

Travers, Robert – A Learned & a Very Profitable Exposition made upon the 111th Psalm  (London, 1579)  The work is dedicated to scholars at Cambridge.

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Psalm 112:1-2

Stint, Thomas – An Exposition upon the 112th Psalm [vv. 1-2], The Highway to Everlasting Blessedness…  (London, 1621)

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Psalm 116

Gibson, Thomas – Meditations upon the Hundred & Sixteen Psalm, very profitable for all Christians. With an application to the present times, showing the true use of our late deliverance  (London, 1607)

Gibson appears to have been English.

Gouge, William – The Saint’s Sacrifice, or, a Commentary on the 116th Psalm, which is a Gratulatory psalm for deliverance from deadly distress  IA  1632

** “Gouge’s method of cutting up his exposition into sections and discussing everything in proportions, is very tedious to the reader, but we judge it to be advantageous to the preacher.  At any rate Gouge has often given us a hint.  He was a man of great learning.” – Spurgeon

Sclater, William – Sermons Experimental: on Psalms 116 & 117.  Very Useful for a Wounded Spirit  (1638)

Sclater (1575-1626) was a reformed puritan.

Cradock, Walter – ‘Expositions & Observations on Psalm 116’  in Divine Drops Distilled from the Fountain of Holy Scriptures: delivered in several exercises before sermons, upon Twenty and Three Texts of Scripture  (London, 1650)

Cradock was an Independent, reformed minister.

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Psalm 117

Sclater, William – Sermons Experimental: on Psalms 116 & 117.  Very Useful for a Wounded Spirit  (1638)

Sclater (1575-1626) was a reformed puritan.

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Psalm 118

Boys, John – Psalm 118   1629 in Works

Boys (1571-1625) was a reformed Anglican, who was the Dean of Canterbury.  

*** – “One of the richest of writers.  From his golden pen flows condensed wisdom.  Many of his sentences are worthy to be quoted as gems of the Christian classics.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 119

1500’s

Calvin, John – Sermons on Psalm 119  d. 1564  22 sermons, a sermon on each section

Greenham, Richard – An Exposition of the 119th Psalm  1612  d. 1591

** – “We regret that this comment is not published separately, and is only to be procured by purchasing the rest of Greenham’s works.  The style, however, is antique and cramped, and Manton and Bridges are quite enough.” – Spurgeon

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1600’s

Estye, George – An Exposition upon the 119th Psalm  in Certain Godly & Learned Expositions Upon Diverse Parts of Scripture, as they were Preached…  (London, 1603)

Estye (c.1560-1601) was a reformed Anglican clergyman.

Cowper, William – A Holy Alphabet for Sion’s Scholars. A Commentary upon the 119th Psalm  1613

Cowper (1566-1619) was the Anglican bishop of Galloway.

**“Dr. M’Crie gives a high character to all Cowper’s works, and says that a vein of practical piety runs through them, while the style is remarkable for ease and fluency.  This remark applies emphatically to the ‘Holy Alphabet’.  We have found it very delightful reading.” – Spurgeon

Manton, Thomas – 190 sermons on the 119th Psalm, vols. 1 (vv. 1-59), 2 (60-123), 3 (124-End)  d. 1677

*** “Fully up to Manton’s highest mark, and he is well known to have been one of the chief of the Puritan brotherhood.  The work is long, but that results only from the abundance of the matter.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 120-134  The Psalms of Degrees

Luther, Martin – A Commentary upon the Fifteen Psalms, called ‘Psalms of Degrees’  d. 1546

Loredano, Giovanni Francesco – The Ascents of the Soul, or, David’s Mount Towards God’s House, being Paraphrases on the Fifteen Psalms of Degrees  (London, 1681)

Loredano was an Itallian (likely Romanist) scholar, writer and politician.  These extended paraphrases are very devotional, pious, and appear to be very good.

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Psalm 122

Willet, Andrew – A Brief Exposition of Psalm 122  1603

* – “Willet ought to have known better than to twist a psalm to the honor and glory of James I.  As a learned man he says good things, and as a courtier foolish things.” – Spurgeon

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Psalms 124-125

Luther, Martin – A Word in Season: being the Commentary of Dr. Martin Luther on three selected Psalms: viz. the 124th, 125th & 129th, with his commentary on some part of the fourth and fifth chapters of the First Epistle of St. Peter. Being of special use for the present times.  (London, 1685)

Stint, Thomas – An Exposition on the 124th, 125th, 126th Psalms, called the Psalms of Degrees: or, the Church’s Deliverance…  (London, 1621)

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Psalm 126

Stint, Thomas – An Exposition on the 124th, 125th, 126th Psalms, called the Psalms of Degrees: or, the Church’s Deliverance…  (London, 1621)

Hume, John – The Jews’s Deliverance out of Babylon & the Mystery of our Redemption, Plainly Demonstrated in Ten Sermons upon the 126th Psalm  (London, 1628)

Hume was an English minister and made use of many classic expositions of the psalms before him throughout Church history.

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Psalm 129

Luther, Martin – A Word in Season: being the Commentary of Dr. Martin Luther on Three Selected Psalms: viz. the 124th, 125th & 129th, with his commentary on some part of the fourth and fifth chapters of the First Epistle of St. Peter. Being of special use for the present times.  (London, 1685)

Du Vair, Guillaume – A Most Heavenly & Plentiful Treasure, or a Rich Mineral Full of Sweetest Comforts…  (London, 1609)  including meditations on Psalms 6, 15, 26, 31, 34, 37, 43, 46, 50, 73, 102, 129, 142

Du Vair (1556-1621) was a French Romanist and lawyer.

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Psalm 130   (See also Expositions of the Penitential Psalms Above)

1500’s

Richardson, Robert – A Brief & Compendious Exposition upon the Psalm called De Profundis, which has been and presently is horrible and detestable abused in the Church of God. And now translated to the true sense…  (London, 1570)

Richardson was a minister in London.

Rollock, Robert – 2 Sermons on Ps. 130  23 pp., from his Select Works  Buy, vol. 1, pp. 457-481  †1599

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1600’s

Roberts, Alexander – An Exposition upon the Hundred & Thirty Psalm.  Gathered out of Some of the Ancient Fathers & Later Writers…  (London, 1610)

Roberts (d. 1620) was an English minister.  Here is the extensive list of other commentators through Church history that he made use of  in this exposition.

Sibbes, Richard – The Saint’s Comforts: an Exposition upon Ps. 130 in Works, vol. 6  1638

** – “Notes on five verses only.  Published without the author’s sanction, it is incomplete, but very full as far as it goes, and considering its brevity.” – Spurgeon

Owen, John – Practical Exposition on Ps. 130  1669  566 pages  

***“One of the best known and most esteemed of John Owen’s works.  It is unnecessary to say that he is the prince of divines.  to master his works is to be a profound theologian.  Owen is said to be prolix, but it would be truer to say that he is condensed.  His style is heavy because he gives notes of what he might have said, and passes on without fully developing the great thoughts of his capacious mind.  He requires hard study, and none of us ought to grudge it.” – Spurgeon

Hutcheson, George – 45 Sermons upon the 130th Psalm  †1674

***“We have already advised the purchase of anything and everything by Hutcheson.  Be sure not to confound this with [Anne] Hutchinson [the New England antinomian heretic].” – Spurgeon

Leighton, Robert – Meditations Practical and Critical on Ps 130   Buy  †1684  in Works, vol. 2

***“Everything that fell from his pen is worth its weight in diamonds.” – Spurgeon

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Psalm 131

Manton, Thomas – 5 Sermons upon Ps. 131  56 pp. in Works, vol. 21, p. 406 ff.

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Psalm 142

Du Vair, Guillaume – A Most Heavenly & Plentiful Treasure, or a Rich Mineral Full of Sweetest Comforts…  (London, 1609)  including meditations on Psalms 6, 15, 26, 31, 34, 37, 43, 46, 50, 73, 102, 129, 142

Du Vair (1556-1621) was a French Romanist and lawyer.

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Psalm 143

See the Expositions of the Penitential Psalms Above

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Psalm 148

Vines, Richard – The Saint’s Nearness to God, being a discourse upon part of the 148th Psalm  †1656

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Psalm 150

Boys, John – An Exposition of the Last Psalm delivered in a Sermon  1613

Boys (1571-1625) was a reformed Anglican, who was the Dean of Canterbury.

*** – “One of the richest of writers.  From his golden pen flows condensed wisdom.  Many of his sentences are worthy to be quoted as gems of the Christian classics.” – Spurgeon


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Proverbs

1500’s

Cope, Michael – A Godly and Learned Exposition upon the Proverbs of Solomon  1580

Cope was a minister in Geneva.

Wilcox, Thomas – A Short, yet Sound Commentary Written on that Worthy Work Called the Proverbs of Solomon  1589

Wilcox (c.1549-1608) was a reformed puritan.

**  ‘Very old.  the notes are brief, but furnish many hints for sermons.’  ‘Wilcocks briefly sums up the teaching of the verses, and so aids in suggesting topics; in other respects he is rather wearying.’ – Spurgeon

Moffett, Peter – A Commentary on the Whole Book of Proverbs  2nd ed. 1594

** “Homely, but not very striking.  Mr. Nichol’s choice of commentators for reprinting was not a wise one.”

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1600’s

Dod, John & Cleaver, Robert – A Brief Explanation of the Whole Book of the Proverbs of Solomon  (1616)  This is the same work as the commentaries on chapters of Proverbs listed at EEBO under John Dod.

**“Both Dod and Cleaver were popular as preachers, and their joint works were widely circulated.  This book can rarely be met with entire.” – Spurgeon

Jermin, Michael – Paraphrastical Meditations upon the Book of Proverbs  1638

Jermin (1590-1659) was a Reformed Anglican.

**“Very antique and full of Latin quotations.  Jermin does not err in excessive spirituality, but the reverse.  Those who can put up with his style will be repaid by his quaint learning.” – Spurgeon

Leigh, Edward – Annotations on Five Poetical Books of the Old Testament: Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and Canticles  1657

**  ‘Good, brief notes.  Antique, but still prized.’ – Spurgeon

Jackson, Arthur – Annotations upon Job, the Psalms, the Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and the Song of Solomon  1658

“In 1653, Arthur Jackson, Preacher of God’s Word in Wood Street, London, issued four volumes upon the Old Testament, which appear to have been the result of his pulpit expositions to his people.  Valuable his works would be if there were no better, but they are not comparable to others already and afterwards mentioned.  You can do without him, but he is a reputable author.” – Spurgeon

Blair, Robert – [On Proverbs, but Title Unknown]  †1666

This work was part of the Scottish divines’ project to produce popular commentaries on difficult books of the Bible, which series included the authors: David Dickson, Alexander Nisbet, George Hutcheson and James Fergusson.  Blair finished this work in manuscript, but it was never published.

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Chapters in Proverbs

Taylor, Francis – An Exposition with Practical Observations upon the Three First Chapters of the Proverbs  1645  An Exposition upon chs. 4-9  1657

Taylor was a Westminster divine.

*** “Two volumes (in one) of rich, old fashioned Puritan divinity.” – Spurgeon

Hammond, Henry – A Paraphrase and Annotations upon the Psalms, as also upon the Ten First Chapters of the) Proverbs  1684  d. 1660

Hammond was an Arminian, Latitudinarian Anglican.  Matthew Henry was able to quote from Hammond throughout his commentary.

** “Much esteemed, and deservedly so.  Hammond’s weighty tome is somewhat dry, and many of his remarks are rather those of a linguist than of a divine, but he touches on many matters which others omit, and is, upon the whole, an expositor of singular merit.”  – Spurgeon

Dod, John & William Hinde – Bathsheba’s Instructions to her Son Lemuel, containing a Fruitful and Plain Exposition of the Last Chapter of the Proverbs, Describing the Duties of a Great Man, and the Virtues of a Gracious Woman  (London, 1614)

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Topical Arrangement of the Proverbs

1600’s

Hall, Joseph – Salomon’s Divine Arts, of: 1. Ethics, 2. Politics, 3. Economics that is; the government of: 1. Behavior, 2. Commonwealth, 3. Family.  Drawn into method, out of his Proverbs & Ecclesiastes.  With an Open and Plain Paraphrase upon the Song of Songs  1609


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Ecclesiastes

1500’s

Luther, Martin – An Exposition of Solomon’s book called Ecclesiastes, or ‘The Preacher’  Buy  d. 1546

**“Even the British Museum authorities have been unable to find this octavo for us, though it is mentioned in their catalogue.” – Spurgeon

Serranus, John – A Godly & Learned Commentary upon Ecclesiastes  1585  d. 1552

*  “Serranus was a Protestant pastor at Nismes, of such moderate opinions, and such objectionable modes of stating them, that he was about equally abhorred by Romanists and Protestants.  He is said to have been very inaccurate in his learning.” – Spurgeon

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1600’s

Broughton, Hugh – A Commentary upon Coheleth, or Ecclesiastes  1605

Broughton was a reformed Anglican.

* “Broughton was a far-famed and rather pretentious Hebraist whom Dr. Gill quoted as an authority.  His work is nearly obsolete, but its loss is not a severe one.” – Spurgeon

Granger, Thomas – A Familiar Exposition, or Commentary, on Ecclesiastes, wherein the World’s Vanity and the True Felicity are Plainly Deciphered  1621  344 pp.

** – ” Very antique, containing many obsolete and coarse phrases; but pithy and quaint.” – Spurgeon

Pemble, William – Salomon’s Recantation and Repentance, or the Book of Ecclesiastes Briefly and Fully Explained  in Works, pp. 281-344  †1623  

Pemble was a Reformed puritan.

** – “Anthony a Wood calls Pemble ‘a famous preacher, a skillful linguist, a good orator, and an ornament to society.’  Moreover, he was a learned Calvinistic divine.  This ‘Recantation’ is a minor production.  The style is scholastic, with arrangements of the subjects such as render it hard to read.  We confess we are disappointed with it.” – Spurgeon

Cotton, John – A Brief Exposition with Practical Observations upon the Whole Book of Ecclesiastes  †1652  Cotton was the New England puritan.

** “By a great linguist and sound divine.  Ecclesiastes is not a book to be expounded verse by verse; but Cotton does it as well as anyone.” – Spurgeon

Leigh, Edward – Annotations on Five Poetical Books of the Old Testament: Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and Canticles  1657

**  ‘Good, brief notes.  Antique, but still prized.’ – Spurgeon

Jackson, Arthur – Annotations upon Job, the Psalms, the Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and the Song of Solomon  1658

“In 1653, Arthur Jackson, Preacher of God’s Word in Wood Street, London, issued four volumes upon the Old Testament, which appear to have been the result of his pulpit expositions to his people.  Valuable his works would be if there were no better, but they are not comparable to others already and afterwards mentioned.  You can do without him, but he is a reputable author.” – Spurgeon

Jermin, Michael – A Commentary upon the Whole Book of Ecclesiastes, or The Preacher  1659

Jermin (1590-1659) was a Reformed Anglican.

** – “The school to which Jermin belonged delighted to display their learning, of which they had no small share; they excelled in wise sayings, but not in unction.  the fruit is ripe, but lacks flavor.” – Spurgeon

Reynolds, Edward – A Commentary on the Book of Ecclesiastes  d. 1676

** – “See [the] Westminster Assembly’s Annotations, for which Reynolds wrote this.  He is always good.” – Spurgeon

Anonymous – Annotations on the Book of Ecclesiastes  London, printed by Streater  1669  This book is the same as that by Edward Reynolds.

*  “By no means remarkable, except for some extreme rarity.” – Spurgeon

Nisbet, Alexander – An Exposition with Practical Observations upon the Book of Ecclesiastes  Pod  †1669

** – ‘One of those solid works which learned Scotch divines of the seventeenth century have left us in considerable numbers.  In our judgment it is as heavy as it is weighty.’ – Surgeon

Sikes, George – An Exposition of Ecclesiastes, or, The Preacher  1680

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Commentary on Ecclesiastes in Latin

Beza, Theodore – Ecclesiastes: Solomon’s Sermon to the People about Life thus set forth, so that they may achieve True and Eternal Happiness, in Paraphrase and Opened by Theodore Beza  1588  88 pp.

** – “Sure to be weighty and instructive.  It is exceedingly rare.” – Spurgeon, on the English translation

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Ecclesiastes Arranged by Subject with a Commentary

Hall, Joseph – Salomon’s Divine Arts, of: 1. Ethics, 2. Politics, 3. Economics that is; the government of: 1. Behavior, 2. Commonwealth, 3. Family.  Drawn into method, out of his Proverbs & Ecclesiastes.  With an Open and Plain Paraphrase upon the Song of Songs  1609

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Chapters in Ecclesiastes

Gifford, George – Eight Sermons, upon the First Four Chapters, and part of the Fifth, of Ecclesiastes  1589

Gifford (1547-1600) was a Reformed puritan.

Smith, John – King Solomon’s Portraiture of Old Age, wherein is contained a Sacred Anatomy both of Soul and Body, with an account of all these Mystical and Enigmatical Symptoms, expressed in the six former verses of Eccl. 12, made plain and easy  1666

** – “A curious book by a physician, who brings his anatomical knoweldge to bear upon the 12th chapter of Ecclesiastes, and tries to show that Solomon understood the circulation of the blood, etc.  Matthew Poole introduced the substance of this treatise into his Synopsis, and in that huge compilation he speaks eulogistically of the author, with whom he resided.  We mention it because of its singularity.” – Spurgeon


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Song of Solomon

1500’s

Brucioli, Antonio – A Commentary upon the Canticle of Canticles  d. 1566

Brucioli (1498-1566) was an Italian humanist, religious thinker, publisher, and writer best known for his translation of the Bible into Italian.  He came to hold moderate Lutheran views.

Wilcox, Thomas – An Exposition upon the Book of the Canticles, otherwise called Solomon’s Song  1585  

Wilcox (1549-1608) was a reformed puritan.

** – “Very old.  the notes are brief, but furnish many hints for sermons.”  “Short, and somewhat in the manner of a paraphrase.  This venerable author gives a doctrinal summary of each verse, and from this we have frequently been directed to a subject of discourse.” – Spurgeon

Fenner, Dudley – The Song of Solomon, in Verse, with an Exposition  1587

Fenner was Reformed.

* “Moody Stuart says: ‘This is a faithful and excellent translation, accompanied by an admirable exposition.  There is no poetry in it, but the renderings are often good, and the comment valuable.’  We have not met with it.” – Spurgeon

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1600’s

Clapham, Henoch – The Song of Songs Expounded  1603 

Clapham (fl.1585-1614) was a puritan.

* “Clapham was a voluminous author of very remarkable attainments.  He wrote also on the first fourteen chapters of Genesis.  This work is rare as angel’s visits.” – Spurgeon

Hall, Joseph – An Open and Plain Paraphrase upon the Song of Songs  1609  in Salomon’s Divine Arts

Dove, John – The Conversion of Solomon, a Direction to Holiness of Life; handled by way of Commentary upon the Whole Book of Canticles  1613  †1618  Dove was a Reformed Anglican.

*“A quaint old work.  The student will do better with the moderns.  Moreover, this Dove is rare, and seldom lights on poor men’s shelves.” – Spurgeon

Finch, Henry – An Exposition of the Song of Solomon: called Canticles, together with profitable observations collected out of the same  1615

This commentary was published by the Westminster divine, William Gouge.

Ainsworth, Henry – Annotations upon the Five Books of Moses, the Book of the Psalms, and Song of Songs, or, Canticles, vol. 2, p. 681 ff.  d. 1622

***  ‘Thoroughly learned.  Though old, not out of date.’ – Spurgeon

‘Ainsworth was a celebrated scholar and an excellent divine.  His uncommon skill in Hebrew learning, and his excellent commentaries on the Scripture are held in high reputation to this day.’ – Benjamin Brook, ‘Lives of the Puritans’

Hildersham, Arthur – The Canticles, or Song of Solomon Paraphrased and Explained by Diverse Other Texts of Scriptures, Very Useful  GB  †1632  99 pp. with an edition of the Song in verse appended

Homes, Nathaniel – A Commentary on the Canticles  1652  

Homes (1599-1678) was a puritan.

** – “This goes to the very marrow of spiritual teaching, and uses every word and syllable in a deeply experimental manner with great unction and power.  Homes, however, spiritualizes too much, and is both too luscious in expression and too prolix for these degenerate days.” – Spurgeon

Robotham, John – An Exposition on the Whole Book of Solomon’s Song; commonly called the Canticles  1652

**“Very solid; but not to be compared with Durham.  It is just a little dull and common place.”

Leigh, Edward – Annotations on Five Poetical Books of the Old Testament: Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and Canticles  1657

**  ‘Good, brief notes.  Antique, but still prized.’ – Spurgeon

Guild, William – Love’s Intercourse Between the Lamb and his Bride, Christ and his Church.  Or, A clear Explication & Application of the Song of Solomon  1657

** – ‘A rare old work: but we prefer Durham.  The author was one of the better sort of the Scotch Episcopalians.’  – Spurgeon

Durham, James – The Key of the Canticles: an Exposition of the Song of Solomon  EEBO  Buy  †1658

Durham was an influential Scottish covenanter, friends with Samuel Rutherford and George Gillespie.  This commentary has been reprinted by the Banner of Truth.

*** – ‘Durham is always good, and he is at his best upon the Canticles.  He gives us the essence of the good matter.  For practical use this work is perhaps more valuable than any other Key to the Song.’  – Spurgeon

Jackson, Arthur – Annotations upon Job, the Psalms, the Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and the Song of Solomon  1658

“In 1653, Arthur Jackson, Preacher of God’s Word in Wood Street, London, issued four volumes upon the Old Testament, which appear to have been the result of his pulpit expositions to his people.  Valuable his works would be if there were no better, but they are not comparable to others already and afterwards mentioned.  You can do without him, but he is a reputable author.” – Spurgeon

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Paraphrases on the Song

More paraphrases, with expositions, are above.

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Whole Book

Ager, Thomas – A Paraphrase on the Canticles, or Song of Solomon, by the late learned and pious Protestant, Thomas Ager  (London, 1680)

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Chs. 1-3

Jordan, Joshua – The Church’s Ardent Love to Christ, being a Paraphrase on Cant. 1, 2, 3  (London, 1687)

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Portions Throughout the Song of Solomon

1600’s

Gifford, George – Fifteen Sermons upon the Song of Solomon  †1600  

Gifford was a Reformed puritan.

** “We have several times met with this writer’s name coupled with that of Brightman as in his day regarded as a very learned writer, but we cannot procure his work.  Possibly some reader of this catalogue may yet present us with it.  We beg to assure him of the gratitude which we already feel, in the form of ‘a lively sense of favors to come’.” – Spurgeon

Rutherford, Samuel – Communion Sermons (see sermons 9, 11-12 & 14 on Song 2:8-12,14-17; 5:1-2)  Buy, ‘The Spouse’s Longing for Christ’ & ‘The Church Seeking her Lord’ (Song 5:3-10)  Buy  †1661

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Chapters in the Song

Chs. 1-3

Beza, Theodore – Sermons upon the Three First chapters of the Canticle of Canticles: wherein are handled the chiefest points of religion controversed and debated between us and the adversary at this day, especially touching the true Jesus Christ and the true church, and the certain and infallible marks both of the one and of the other  EEBO  1587

*** “These thirty-one sermons are a well of instruction, very precious and refreshing.  The unabbreviated title indicates a controversial use of the Song, and we were therefore prepared to lament the invasion of the dove’s nest of the Canticles by the eagle of debate; but we were agreeably disappointed, for we found much less of argument, and much more of the Well-Beloved than we looked for.” – Spurgeon

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Ch. 1

Knollys, Hanserd – An Exposition of the First Chapter of the Song of Solomon. Wherein the text is analysed, the allegories are explained, and the hidden mysteries are unveiled according to the proportion of faith: With spiritual Meditations upon Every Verse  (London, 1656)

Knollys (1599?-1691) was a baptist.

Collinges, John – The Intercourses of Divine Love Betwixt Christ and his Church, or, The Particular Believing Soul Metaphorically Expressed by Solomon in the First Chapter of the Canticles  63 sermons, 1683  909 pp.  Collinges also had a similar commentary on ch. 2 of the Song, but it does not appear to be online.

*** – ‘Who can pretend to biblical learning who has not made himself familiar with the great writers who spent a life in explaining some one sacred book?… Collinges, with his nine hundred and nine pages upon one chapter of the Song, will not be too full for the preacher’s use.’  

‘Nine hundred and nine quarto pages upon one chapter is more than enough.  The materials are gathered from many sources and make up a mass of wealth.  On the second chapter there are five hundred and thirty pages.  It would try the constitutions of many modern divines to read what these Puritans found it a pleasure to write.  When shall we see their like?’ – Spurgeon

Pack, Samuel – An Exposition upon the First Chapter of the Song of Songs, Handled by Way of Question & Answer for the Information of the Weakest Understanding  (London, 1691)

Pack was an English minister in Kent.

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Chs. 4-6

Sibbes, Richard – Bowels Opened; or a Discovery of the Near and Dear Love, Union and Communion betwixt Christ and the Church.  Sermons on Canticles chs. 4:16-6:3  EEBO  1639

“Nowhere was the epithet ‘mellifluous’ more appropriate than in Sibbes’s series of twenty sermons on the fourth, fifth, and sixth chapters of the Song of Solomon.” – Hughes Oliphant Old

[‘Mellifluous’: a voice or words that are sweet or musical; pleasant to hear.  From the Latin ‘mel’: honey; ‘fluere’: to flow.]

*** – “Sibbes never writes ill.  His repute is such that we need only mention him.  His title is most unfortunate, but in all else his ‘Discovery’ is worthy of our commendation.” – Spurgeon

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Ch. 5

Andrewes, Bartimaeus – Certain Very Worthy, Godly & Profitable Sermons upon the Fifth Chapter of the Songs of Solomon [& 6:1-2]  (London, 1583)

Bartimaeus (c.1550-1616) was a puritan.

Bradshaw, James – The Sleepy Spouse of Christ Alarmed, or a warning to beware of drowsiness when Christ calls lest He withdraw in a discontent, being the sum of some sermons upon Cant. 5th, and the beginning  (London, 1667)  Preface by Nathaniel Vincent

Bradshaw (1636?-1702) was an ejected English puritan who later accepted the 2nd Indulgence.  On occasion he would have a neighboring clergyman preach in his chapel, who would read the Anglican Prayer Book.  When the episcopal visitations made their rounds to his chapel and asked him, ‘Have you common prayer read yearly in your chapel?’, he would hence say ‘yes’.  John Pearson, the bishop of Chester, would not sustain informations against peaceable ministers, so Bradshaw was not disturbed.

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Prophetic-Historical Interpretations of the Song  (not recommended)

1600’s

Brightman, Thomas – A Commentary on the Canticles or the Song of Solomon  d. 1607

*“Brightman was a writer of high renown among the prophetic students of the seventeenth century.  With singular strength of the visionary faculties he sees in the Canticles ‘the whole condition of the church from the time of David, till time shall be no more.’  Expounding on this theory needs an acrobatic imagination.” – Spurgeon

Cotton, John A Brief Exposition of Canticles, or, lively describing the estate of the Church in all the ages thereof, both Jewish and Christian, to this day  1642

* – “Cotton explains the sacred love-song historically, and misses much of its sweetness by so doing.  We should never care to read his exposition while Durham, and Gill, and Moody Stuart are to be had.” – Spurgeon

Brayne, John – An Exposition upon the Canticles  1651

Beverley, Thomas –  An Exposition of the Divinely Prophetic Song of Songs which is Solomon’s, beginning with the reign of David and Solomon, ending in the glorious kingdom of our Lord Jesus Christ, adjusted to the expositor’s line of time, and illustrating it and composed into Verse  1687

* – “This maundering author finds in Canticles the history of the church from David to our Lord, and rhymes no end of rubbish thereon.  truly there is no end to the foolishness of expositors.  We suppose there must be a public for which they cater, and a very foolish public it must be.” – Spurgeon

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Related Pages