On Reformed Orthodoxy & Reformed Scholasticism

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Order of Contents

Articles
Books
Doctrinal
On the Development of
On the Educational System
Method & Generas
On the Decline of

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Introductory Articles

Fesko, John – An Introduction to Reformed Scholasticism  The Counsel of Chalcedon (June/July 2000), pp. 10-15

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Books

‘Contemporary Perspectives on Reformed Orthodoxy: Reformed Confessions, Scholastic Thought and Puritan Divinity in Post-Reformation Protestantism’  being Perichoresis 14.3 (2016)  Perichoresis is the the theological journal of Emanuel University.  The whole issue is devoted to the topic

Muller, Richard – ‘Directions in the Study of Early Modern Reformed Thought’

Beck, Andreas – ‘Reformed Confessions and Scholasticism. Diversity and Harmony’

Abstract: “…the doctrine of the Reformed confessions was much in line with the scholastic theology of Reformed orthodoxy, this paper discusses, after having explained the terms ‘Reformed orthodoxy’ and ‘scholasticism’, the early Reformed scholastic theologians Beza, Zanchi, and Ursinus, who also have written confessional texts. The paper also includes a more detailed discussion of the Belgic Confession and the scholastic background of the Canons of Dordt and the Westminster Confession…”

Pederson, ,Randall J. – ‘Reformed Orthodoxy in Puritanism’

Fesko, John V. ‘- Reformed Orthodoxy on Imputation. Active and Passive Justification’

van den Brink, Gijsbert & Aza Goudriaan – ‘The Image of God in Reformed Orthodoxy. Soundings in the Development of an Anthropological Key Concept’

te Velde, Dolf – ‘The Relevance of Reformed Scholasticism for Contemporary Systematic Theology’

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Doctrinal

Systematic Theology

te Velde, Dolf – ‘The Relevance of Reformed Scholasticism for Contemporary Systematic Theology’  Perichoresis: The Theological Journal of Emanuel University, v14 n3 (2016): 97-115

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God

Merkle, Benjamin – Triune Elohim: the Heidelberg Antitrinitarians and Reformed Readings of Hebrew in the Confessional Age  (Univ. of Oxford, 2012)

Abstract: “In 1563, the publication of the Heidelberg Catechism marked the conversion of the Rhineland Palatinate to a stronghold for Reformed religion. Immediately thereafter, however, the Palatinate church experienced a deeply unsettling surge in the popularity of antitrinitarianism…  later, the displaced Italian theologian and Heidelberg professor, Girolamo Zanchi…  [wrote] his De Tribus Elohim (1572)…  [the] variety of responses to Zanchi’s argument demonstrates the diversity of assumptions about the nature of the biblical text within the Reformed church, contradicting the notion that the Reformed world in the age of “confessionalization” was becoming increasingly homogenous or that the works of John Calvin had become the authoritative touchstone of Reformed orthodoxy in this period.”

Lee, Hansang – Trinitarian Theology and Piety: The Attributes of God in the Thought of Stephen Charnock (1628-1680) and William Perkins (1558-1602)  (Univ. of Edinburgh, 2009)

Abstract:  “Stephen Charnock (1628-1680) is arguably remembered for his importance, at the zenith of Puritan or English Reformed scholastic divinity, in terms of the doctrine of God’s existence and attributes…  His work, with its eclectic acceptance of medieval scholastic intellectual tradition as a tool, plays a significant role in the development of an historical phase of trinitarian and federal theology.”

Gutierrez, Julian – The Lord Reigns Supreme: an investigation on Stephen Charnock’s exegetical, doctrinal, and practical theology concerning the existence and the attributes of God  (Univ. of St. Andrews, 2017)

Abstract: “The findings of this investigation indicate that Charnock’s discourses are theological sermons primarily intended for homiletical purposes and yet organised and reasoned per the scholastic method.”

te Velde, Dolf – ‘Eloquent Silence: The Doctrine of God in the “Synopsis of Purer Theology”‘  Church History and Religious Culture, Vol. 92, No. 4 (2012), pp. 581-608

Rehnman, Sebastian – ‘Theistic Metaphysics and Biblical Exegesis: Francis Turretin on the Concept of God’  Religious Studies, Vol. 38, No. 2 (Jun., 2002), pp. 167-186

Duby, Steven – Divine Simplicity: a Dogmatic Account  (Univ. of St. Andrews, 2014)

Abstract: “This thesis offers a constructive account of the doctrine of divine simplicity in Christian theology. In its methodology, the thesis aims to present this divine perfection as an implicate of the scriptural portrayal of God, to draw upon the insights and conceptual resources of Thomas Aquinas and various Reformed orthodox theologians, and to respond to some objections to divine simplicity…”

Barrett, Jordan P. – ch. 4. ‘Divine Simplicity from the Reformation to Karl Barth’  in Divine Simplicity: A Biblical and Trinitarian Account  Ref  (Augsburg, Fortress, 2017), pp. 93-132

te Velde, Roelf Theodoor – Paths Beyond Tracing Out: the Connection of Method and Content in the Doctrine of God, examined in Reformed Orthodoxy, Karl Barth, and the Utrecht School  (Theological Univ. of Kampen, 2010)

Abstract: “The first part joins the revived interest in Reformed scholastic theology, and attempts to discover the inner dynamics of this allegedly dry and rigid, Aristotelian theology…  In the third part, a first comprehensive description and analysis of the efforts of the so-called Utrecht School is provided.  The final chapter draws some lines for developing a Reformed doctrine of God in the 21st century.”

 

2 Kingdoms & Providence & Politics

VanDrunen, David – ‘The Use of Natural Law in Early Calvinist Resistance Theory’
 Journal of Law and Religion, Vol. 21, No. 1 (2005/2006), pp. 143-167

Campbell, Ian W.S. – ‘Calvinist Absolutism: Archbishop James Ussher and Royal Power’  Journal of British Studies, vol. 53, No. 3 (July, 2014), pp. 588-610

van Nierop, Henk – The Life of Romeyn de Hooghe, 1645-1708: Prints, Pamphlets, and Politics in the Dutch Golden Age  (Amsterdam Univ. Press, 2018)  Table of Contents

VanDrunen, David – ‘The Two Kingdoms Doctrine and the Relationship of Church and State in the Early Reformed Tradition’, Journal of Church and State
Vol. 49, No. 4 (AUTUMN 2007), pp. 743-763

Beeke, Jonathon – The 9 Defended Propositions of his Duplex Regnum Christi: Christ’s Twofold Kingdom in Reformed Theology  (Univ. of Groningen, 2019)

Abstract: “…it does ask the question, “How was the doctrine of Christ’s twofold kingdom expressed in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries?” The research concentrates on select Reformers of the sixteenth century and representative intellectual centers of the seventeenth century (notably, Geneva, Leiden, and Edinburgh). A primary concern is to trace the development of this doctrine over the two centuries in question.”

Baylor, Timothy – A Great King Above All gods: Dominion and Divine Government in the Theology of John Owen  (Univ. of St. Andrews, 2016)

Abstract:  “Scholarship has tended to depict John Owen as a “Reformed catholic” attempting a synthesis of Reformed principles with a largely Thomist doctrine of God.  In this thesis, I argue that this depiction risks losing sight of those aspects of Owen’s doctrine of God that are intended to support a distinctly Protestant account of the economy of grace…  In chapter one, I argue against prevailing readings of Owen’s thought that his theology of the divine will is, in fact, “voluntarist” in nature, prioritizing God’s will over his intellect in the determination of the divine decree.”

Kirby, W. J. Torrance – The Doctrine of the Royal Supremacy in the Thought of Richard Hooker  (Univ. of Oxford, 1987)

Burton, Simon – ‘The Scholastic and Conciliar Roots of Samuel Rutherford’s Political Philosophy: the Influence of Jean Gerson, Jacques Almain, and John Mair’  in Alexander Broadie, Scottish Philosophy in the Seventeenth Century  Pre  (Oxford, 2020)

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Theology

ed. Denlinger – Reformed Orthodoxy in Scotland: Essays on Scottish Theology 1560-1775  Buy  (London: 2015)

Bangs, Carl – ‘Dutch Theology, Trade, and War: 1590-1610’  Church History, Vol. 39, No. 4 (Dec., 1970), pp. 470-482

Trueman, Carl – ‘Puritanism as Ecumenical Theology’  Nederlands archief voor kerkgeschiedenis / Dutch Review of Church History, Vol. 81, No. 3 (2001), pp. 326-336

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Anthropology

Pitkin, Barbara – ‘The Protestant Zeno: Calvin and the Development of Melanchthon’s Anthropology’  The Journal of Religion, Vol. 84, No. 3 (July 2004), pp. 345-378

Jones, Mark – Why Heaven Kissed Earth: the Christology of Thomas Goodwin (1600-1680)  (Leiden, 2009)

Donnelly, John Patrick – Calvinism and Scholasticism in Vermigli’s Doctrine of Man and Grace  (Leiden: Brill, 1976)

 

Grace

Donnelly, John Patrick – Calvinism and Scholasticism in Vermigli’s Doctrine of Man and Grace  (Leiden: Brill, 1976)

 

Atonement

Armstrong, Brian – Calvinism and the Amyraut heresy; Protestant scholasticism and humanism in seventeenth-century France  (Univ. of Wisconsin Press, 1969)

Kang Hyo Ju – The Extent of the Atonement in the thought of John Davenant (1572-1641) in the context of the Early Modern Era  (Univ. of Aberdeen, 2018)

Fraser of Brea

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Decrees

Voak, Nigel – ‘English Molinism in the Late 1590’s: Richard Hooker on Free Will, Predestination, and Divine Foreknowledge’  The Journal of Theological Studies
New Series, vol. 60, No. 1 (April, 2009), pp. 130-177

Venema, Cornelis – ‘Heinrich Bullinger’s Correspondence on Calvin’s Doctrine of Predestination, 1551-1553’  The Sixteenth Century Journal, Vol. 17, No. 4 (Winter, 1986), pp. 435-450

Kim, San-Deog – Time and Eternity: a Study in Samuel Rutherford’s theology, with reference to his use of scholastic method  Ref  (Univ. of Aberdeen, 2002)

Jones, Mark – Why Heaven Kissed Earth: the Christology of Thomas Goodwin (1600-1680)  (Leiden, 2009)

Fesko, J.V. – Diversity within the Reformed tradition: Supra- and Infralapsarianism in Calvin, Dort, and Westminster  (Univ. of Aberdeen, 1999)

Abstract: “Scholars argue that it was scholasticism and rationalism that turned Calvin’s biblical doctrine of predestination into an arid metaphysical system of decrees. This thesis argues contra the modern critics that post-Reformation Reformed theologians did not distort Calvin’s doctrine of predestination but rather modified it…  The thesis demonstrates that Calvin was a supralapsarian and that Dort and Westminster are infralapsarian.”

 

Assurance

Winship, Michael P. – ‘Weak Christians, Backsliders, and Carnal Gospelers: Assurance of Salvation and the Pastoral Origins of Puritan Practical Divinity in the 1580s’  Church History, Vol. 70, No. 3 (Sep., 2001), pp. 462-481

Master, Jonathan Lair – Anthony Burgess and the Westminster Doctrine of Assurance  (Univ. of Aberdeen, 2012)

Abstract: “Burgess’ writings are informed by three aspects of his personal background. The first of these is his status as part of the English Puritan movement in the 17th century; the second is his status as a pastor; the third is his scholastic training, which informed his method of argumentation on the assurance of faith.”

 

Incarnation

Spencer, Stephen – Reformed Scholasticism in Medieval Perspective: Thomas Aquinas and Francois Turrettini on the Incarnation  (Michigan State Univ., 1988)

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Scripture

Nellen, Henk & Jan Bloemendal – ‘Erasmus’s Biblical Project: Some Thoughts and Observations on Its Scope, Its Impact in the Sixteenth Century and Reception in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries’  Church History and Religious Culture
Vol. 96, No. 4, Special Issue: Littera scripta manet: Erasmus and the 1516 Novum Instrumentum (2016), pp. 595-635

Voak, Nigel – ‘Richard Hooker and the Principle of ‘Sola Scriptura’  The Journal of Theological Studies, New Series, vol. 59, No. 1 (April, 2008), pp. 96-139

Stanglin, Keith – ‘The Rise and Fall of Biblical Perspicuity: Remonstrants and the Transition toward Modern Exegesis’  Church History, Vol. 83, No. 1 (March, 2014), pp. 38-59

ed. Holcomb, Justin – PART II: Reformation and Counter-Reformation, chs. 5-8  in Christian Theologies of Scripture: A Comparative Introduction  (NYU Press, 2006)  330 pp.  Table of contents

Leslie, Andrew Michael – “Glory of God in the Face of Jesus Christ”: Divine Authority, Scripture, and the Life of Faith in the Thought of John Owen (1616-1683)  (Univ. of Edin., 2013)

Schneider, J. R. – Melanchthon’s idea of biblical authority as it developed under the influence of his rhetorical theory to 1521  Ref  (Univ. of Cambridge, 1986)

Ward, Timothy – Word and Supplement: Reconstructing the doctrine of the Sufficiency of Scripture  (Univ. of Edinburgh, 1999)

Abstract: “The body of the thesis begins with an analytical overview of the history of the doctrine’s development and decline, focusing on its full articulation in the Protestant Reformation and in post-Reformation Protestant scholasticism, (chapter 2). Theologians of the latter type, particularly Francis Turretin, are defended against the charge that they departed significantly from the Reformation understanding of Scripture…  with a defence of the orthodox Protestant doctrine of biblical inspiration, as articulated by B.B. Warfield.  A conception of the canon of Scripture as ‘sufficient’ is offered.

van den Belt, Hendrik – Autopistia: the Self-Convincing Authority of Scripture in Reformed Theology  (Leiden Univ., 2006)

“Autopistia offers a historical survey and a theological evaluation of the self-convincing character of Scripture in Reformed theology.  Calvin adopted the term autopistos from ancient Greek philosophy and used it to express that faith does not rest on the human authority of the church but on Scripture as the living voice of God. After discussing the meaning of the term in Reformed Orthodoxy and analyzing the theological position of Benjamin B. Warfield and Herman Bavinck on this issue… Van den Belt draws his theological conclusions in this study, advocating a revitalization of the autopistia of Scripture…”

 

Worship & Images

Bridges, Timothy – ‘Down with it, even to the ground’ : William Dowsing’s reception of the iconoclastic rationale  (Univ. of Edinburgh, 2009)

Abstract:  “Caricatured as the Arch Vandal, William Dowsing (bap. 1596-1668) was a farmer and a soldier who entered into history as a radical figure in the English Civil War between Charles I and the Long Parliament. The Earl of Manchester commissioned Dowsing to tear down ‘pictures and superstitious images’ in the name of God and a parliamentary ordinance of 1643.  The commission grew out of a series of puritan reform measures which aimed to overthrow the ‘popish innovations’ implemented in part by Archbishop William Laud in the 1630s…  The objective [of this thesis] is to penetrate the puritan movement and to explore iconoclastic thought ‘from within’.”

 

Christ

Bell, Michael D. – ‘Maccovius (1588—1644) on the Son of God as ἀυτóϑεος’
Church History and Religious Culture, Vol. 91, No. 1/2, The Reception of John Calvin and His Theology in Reformed Orthodoxy (2011), pp. 105-119

 

Union with Christ

Carter, Jonathan Mark – ‘Partakers of his Divine Nature’: the Reality of Union with Christ in Thomas Goodwin’s Defence of Reformed Soteriology  (Univ. of Edin., 2017)

Abstract: “…the majority of Goodwin’s treatises were composed during the 1650s and intended to form a grand project defending Reformed soteriology against the new threats of Socinian and radical teachings as well as its traditional opponents, Catholics and Arminians. Goodwin considered this grand project to be his life’s work. It represents the longest exposition of Reformed soteriology composed by an English puritan. However, no modern critical study of the soteriology of his grand project has appeared to date. This thesis, therefore, offers a theological examination in light of his immediate historical context. The study focuses on union with Christ, because Goodwin assumed it occupied a fundamental role in salvation and, therefore, it allows identification of the architectonic structures of his soteriology. The immediate historical context is privileged, because union with Christ (and related loci) was a point of sharp dispute in the 1640s–1650s.”

Farthing, John L. – ‘De Coniugio Spirituali [On the Spiritual Marriage], Jerome Zanchi on Ephesians 5:22-33’  The Sixteenth Century Journal, Vol. 24, No. 3 (Autumn, 1993), pp. 621-652

 

Work of Christ

Tay, Edwin E.M. – Priesthood of Christ in the atonement theology of John Owen (1616-1683)  (Univ. of Edinburgh, 2010)

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The Gospel Call

van den Belt, Henk – ‘The Vocatio [Call] in the Leiden Disputations (1597—1631): The Influence of the Arminian Controversy on the Concept of the Divine Call to Salvation’  Church History and Religious Culture, Vol. 92, No. 4 (2012), pp. 539-559

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Lord’s Supper

Cameron, James K. – The Theory of Eucharistic Presence in the Early Caroline Divines, examined in its European theological setting  (Univ. of St. Andrews, 1985)

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Arminianism

Guibbory, Achsah – ‘Donne’s Religion: Montagu, Arminianism and Donne’s Sermons, 1624-1630’  English Literary Renaissance, Vol. 31, No. 3 (Autumn, 2001), pp. 412-439

Stanglin, Keith D. – ‘Johannes Kuchlinus, the ‘Faithful Teacher’: His Role in the Arminian Controversy and His Impact as a Theological Interpreter and Educator’  Church History and Religious Culture, Vol. 87, No. 3 (2007), pp. 305-326

Kuchlinus (1546-1606) was a reformed pastor in Amsterdam and the founding regent of the theological college at Leiden University, “who influenced a generation”, particularly during the boiling controversy between Arminius and Gomarus on the faculty at Leiden.

den Boer, William – ‘”Cum delectu”: Jacob Arminius’s (1559—1609) Praise for and Critique of Calvin and His Theology’  Church History and Religious Culture, Vol. 91, No. 1/2, The Reception of John Calvin and His Theology in Reformed Orthodoxy (2011), pp. 73-86

van den Belt, Henk – ‘The Vocatio [Call] in the Leiden Disputations (1597—1631): The Influence of the Arminian Controversy on the Concept of the Divine Call to Salvation’  Church History and Religious Culture, Vol. 92, No. 4 (2012), pp. 539-559

Yagi, Takayuki – A Gift from England: William Ames and his Polemical Discourse Against Dutch Arminianism  (Univ. of Edinburgh, 2020)

Abstract: “In the face of Remonstrant teaching which tended to compromise divine sovereignty at the cost of human freedom, Ames made serious efforts to maintain the supremacy of God in his works of predestination, redemption, conversion, and perseverance, while at the same time establishing human freedom.  Through these efforts, Ames vigorously defended the Reformed tradition…  To do this, he appropriated various medieval scholastic distinctions.  Some of these distinctions were already established in the Reformed tradition…  The use of other distinctions, such as those used for explaining the compatibility between the irresistibility of grace and human freedom, appear to have been pioneered in Reformed thought by Ames.”

 

Covenant Theology

Woolsey

Blacketer, Raymond A. – ‘Arminius’ Concept of Covenant in its Historical Context’  Dutch Review of Church History, Vol. 80, No. 2 (2000), pp. 193-220

Strehle, Stephen – Fides aut Foedus [Faith or Covenant]: Wittenberg and Zurich in Conflict over the Gospel’  The Sixteenth Century Journal, Vol. 23, No. 1 (Spring, 1992), pp. 3-20

Bierma, Lyle – ‘The Role of Covenant Theology in Early Reformed Orthodoxy  The Sixteenth Century Journal’  Vol. 21, No. 3 (Autumn, 1990), pp. 453-462

McGiffert, Michael – ‘Henry Hammond and Covenant Theology’  Church History
Vol. 74, No. 2 (Jun., 2005), pp. 255-285

Hammond was an English Arminian.

Lettinga, Neil – ‘Covenant Theology Turned Upside Down: Henry Hammond and Caroline Anglican Moralism: 1643-1660’  The Sixteenth Century Journal, Vol. 24, No. 3 (Autumn, 1993), pp. 653-669

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Natural Theology & Natural Law

Kirby, W.J. Torrance – ‘Richard Hooker’s Theory of Natural Law in the Context of Reformation Theology’  The Sixteenth Century Journal, Vol. 30, No. 3 (Autumn, 1999), pp. 681-703

VanDrunen, David – ‘The Use of Natural Law in Early Calvinist Resistance Theory’
 Journal of Law and Religion, Vol. 21, No. 1 (2005/2006), pp. 143-167

Woolford, Thomas – Natural Theology and Natural Philosophy in the Late Renaissance  (Univ. of Cambridge, 2012)

Mangold, Matthias – ‘Salomon van Til (1643—1713): His Appropriation of Cartesian Tenets in His Compendium of Natural Theology’  Church History and Religious Culture, Vol. 94, No. 3 (2014), pp. 337-357

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Eschatology

Clouse, Robert G. – Johann Heinrich Alsted and English Millennialism  The Harvard Theological Review, Vol. 62, No. 2 (Apr., 1969), pp. 189-207

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Antinomianism

Donato, Christopher John – ‘”Against the Law: Milton’s (Anti?) Nomianism in De Doctrina Christiana“‘  The Harvard Theological Review, Vol. 104, No. 1 (JANUARY 2011), pp. 69-91

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On the Development of Reformed Scholasticism

Articles

Regarding Calvin

den Boer, William – ‘”Cum delectu”: Jacob Arminius’s (1559—1609) Praise for and Critique of Calvin and His Theology’  Church History and Religious Culture, Vol. 91, No. 1/2, The Reception of John Calvin and His Theology in Reformed Orthodoxy (2011), pp. 73-86

Goudriaan, Aza – ‘Ulrik Huber (1636—1694) and John Calvin: The Franeker Debate on Human Reason and the Bible (1686—1687)’  Church History and Religious Culture, Vol. 91, No. 1/2, The Reception of John Calvin and His Theology in Reformed Orthodoxy (2011), pp. 165-178

Baschera, Luca – ‘Independent Yet Harmonious: Some Remarks on the Relationship between the Theology of Peter Martyr Vermigli (1499—1562) and John Calvin’  Church History and Religious Culture
Vol. 91, No. 1/2, The Reception of John Calvin and His Theology in Reformed Orthodoxy (2011), pp. 43-57

Neele, Adriaan C. – ‘The Reception of John Calvin’s Work by Petrus van Mastricht (1630—1706)’  Church History and Religious Culture, Vol. 91, No. 1/2, The Reception of John Calvin and His Theology in Reformed Orthodoxy (2011), pp. 149-163

Muller, Richard – ‘The “Reception of Calvin” in Later Reformed Theology: Concluding Thoughts’  Church History and Religious Culture
Vol. 91, No. 1/2, The Reception of John Calvin and His Theology in Reformed Orthodoxy (2011), pp. 255-274

Bell, Michael D. – ‘Maccovius (1588—1644) on the Son of God as ἀυτóϑεος’
Church History and Religious Culture, Vol. 91, No. 1/2, The Reception of John Calvin and His Theology in Reformed Orthodoxy (2011), pp. 105-119

Minkema, Kenneth – ‘A “Dordtian Philosophe”: Jonathan Edwards, Calvin, and Reformed Orthodoxy’  Church History and Religious Culture, Vol. 91, No. 1/2, The Reception of John Calvin and His Theology in Reformed Orthodoxy (2011), pp. 241-253

Vos, Antonie – ‘The Systematic Place of Reformed Scholasticism: Reflections Concerning the Reception of Calvin’s Thought’  Church History and Religious Culture, Vol. 91, No. 1/2, The Reception of John Calvin and His Theology in Reformed Orthodoxy (2011), pp. 29-41

Hoek, Peter – ‘Melchior Leydecker (1642—1721): Reformed Scholasticism of a Catholic Character in Calvin’s Footsteps’  Church History and Religious Culture, Vol. 91, No. 1/2, The Reception of John Calvin and His Theology in Reformed Orthodoxy (2011), pp. 193-201

van der Pol, Frank – ‘The Profile and Use of John Calvin in the “Dissertatie” and the “Institutiones theologiae practicae” of Simon Oomius (1630—1706)’  Church History and Religious Culture, Vol. 91, No. 1/2, The Reception of John Calvin and His Theology in Reformed Orthodoxy (2011), pp. 179-192

te Velde, Dolf – “Soberly and Skillfully”: John Calvin and Jerome Zanchi (1516—1590) as Proponents of Reformed Doctrine’  Church History and Religious Culture, Vol. 91, No. 1/2, The Reception of John Calvin and His Theology in Reformed Orthodoxy (2011), pp. 59-71

Trueman, Carl R. – ‘The Reception of Calvin: Historical Considerations’  Church History and Religious Culture, Vol. 91, No. 1/2, The Reception of John Calvin and His Theology in Reformed Orthodoxy (2011), pp. 19-27

Gootjes, Albert – ‘Calvin and Saumur: The Case of Claude Pajon (1626—1685)’  Church History and Religious Culture, Vol. 91, No. 1/2, The Reception of John Calvin and His Theology in Reformed Orthodoxy (2011), pp. 203-214

Beck, Andreas – ‘”Expositio Reverentialis”: Gisbertus Voetius’s (1589—1676) Relationship with John Calvin’  Church History and Religious Culture, Vol. 91, No. 1/2, The Reception of John Calvin and His Theology in Reformed Orthodoxy (2011), pp. 121-133

Svensson, Manfred – ‘Fundamental Doctrines of the Faith, Fundamental Doctrines of Society: Seventeenth-Century Doctrinal Minimalism’  The Journal of Religion, Vol. 94, No. 2 (April 2014), pp. 161-181

Burnett, Amy Nelson – ‘Generational Conflict in the Late Reformation: The Basel Paroxysm’  The Journal of Interdisciplinary History, Vol. 32, No. 2 (Autumn, 2001), pp. 217-242

van ‘t Spijker, Willem – ‘Early Reformation and Scholasticism’  Nederlands archief voor kerkgeschiedenis / Dutch Review of Church History, Vol. 81, No. 3 (2001), pp. 290-305

van Asselt, Willem J. – ‘Protestant Scholasticism: Some Methodological Considerations in the Study of its Development’  Nederlands archief voor kerkgeschiedenis / Dutch Review of Church History, vol. 81, No. 3 (2001), pp. 265-274

van Asselt, W.J. – ‘Review: No Dordt Without Scholasticism: Willem Verboom on the Canons of Dordt’  Church History and Religious Culture, Vol. 87, No. 2 (2007), pp. 203-210

van Asselt, W.J. – ‘Scholasticism Revisited: Methodological Reflections on the Study of Seventeenth-Century Reformed Thought’  in Seeing things their way: intellectual history and the return of religion  (2009), pp. 154-174

van Asselt, W.J. – ‘Scholasticism Protestant and Catholic: Medieval Sources and Methods in Seventeenth Century Reformed Thought’  Jewish and Christian Perspectives Series, volume 8 (2004), pp. 457 – 470

van der Walt, B.J. – ‘Flagging Philosophical Minefields at the Synod of Dort (1618-1619) – Reformed Scholasticism Reconsidered’  Koers: Bulletin for Christian Scholarship, v. 76, no. 3 (2011)

Armstrong, Brian – ‘The Calvinism of Moïse Amyraut: The Warfare of Protestant Scholasticism and French Humanism’  Church History, Vol. 37, No. 2 (Jun., 1968), pp. 205-206

Donnelly, John – ‘Italian Influences on the Development of Calvinist Scholasticism’
 The Sixteenth Century Journal, Vol. 7, No. 1 (Apr., 1976), pp. 81-101

Ryken, Philip G. ‘Scottish Reformed Scholasticism’  in Protestant Scholasticism: Essays in Reassessment  Buy  ed. Trueman & Clark  (Paternoster, 1999)

van ’t Spijker, Willem – ‘Reformation and Scholasticism’  in ed. Boerke & Klok, Martin Bucer (1491-1551): Collected Studies on his Life, Work, Doctrine and Influence  (Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht)

van ’t Spijker, Willem – ‘Reformation between Patristics and Scholasticism. Bucers Theological Position’  in ed. Boerke & Klok, Martin Bucer (1491-1551): Collected Studies on his Life, Work, Doctrine and Influence  (Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht)

van Nierop, Henk – The Life of Romeyn de Hooghe, 1645-1708: Prints, Pamphlets, and Politics in the Dutch Golden Age  (Amsterdam Univ. Press, 2018)  Table of Contents

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Books

Taplin, Mark – The Italian Reformers and the Zurich Church, c.1540-1620  (Univ. of St. Andrews, 1999)

Pederson, Randall James – Unity in Diversity: English Puritans and the Puritan Reformation, 1603-1689  (Leiden Univ., 2013)

Abstract: “This work provides a historiographical and historical survey of current issues within Puritanism, critiques notions of Puritanisms, which tend to fragment the phenomenon, and introduces unitas within diversitas in three divergent Puritans, John Downame, Francis Rous, and Tobias Crisp.”

Hollewand, K.E. – The Banishment of Beverland: Sex, Scripture, and Scholarship in the Seventeenth-Century Dutch Republic  (Univ. of Oxford, 2016)

Abstract: “Hadriaan Beverland (1650-1716) was banished from Holland in 1679. Why did this humanist scholar get into so much trouble in the most tolerant part of Europe in the seventeenth century?…  By restricting sex to marriage, in compliance with Reformed doctrine, secular authorities upheld a sexual morality that was unattainable, Beverland argued…  His intervention came at the moment when the uneasy balance struck between Reformed orthodoxy, humanist scholarship, economic prosperity, and patrician politics, which had characterized the Golden Age of the Dutch Republic, was disintegrating, with unsettling consequences for all concerned.”

Merkle, Benjamin – Triune Elohim: the Heidelberg Antitrinitarians and Reformed Readings of Hebrew in the Confessional Age  (Univ. of Oxford, 2012)

Abstract: “In 1563, the publication of the Heidelberg Catechism marked the conversion of the Rhineland Palatinate to a stronghold for Reformed religion. Immediately thereafter, however, the Palatinate church experienced a deeply unsettling surge in the popularity of antitrinitarianism…  later, the displaced Italian theologian and Heidelberg professor, Girolamo Zanchi…  [wrote] his De Tribus Elohim (1572)…  [the] variety of responses to Zanchi’s argument demonstrates the diversity of assumptions about the nature of the biblical text within the Reformed church, contradicting the notion that the Reformed world in the age of “confessionalization” was becoming increasingly homogenous or that the works of John Calvin had become the authoritative touchstone of Reformed orthodoxy in this period.”

Hampton, Stephen William Peter – Reformed Scholasticism and the Battle for Orthodoxy in the later Stuart Church  Ref  (Univ. of Oxford, 2002)

Murdock, Graeme – International Calvinism and the Reformed church of Hungary and Transylvania, 1613-1658  (Univ. of Oxford, 1996)

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On the Educational System

Articles

Burnett, Amy – ‘The Educational Roots of Reformed Scholasticism: Dialectic and Scriptural Exegesis in the Sixteenth Century’  Nederlands archief voor kerkgeschiedenis / Dutch Review of Church History, Vol. 84 (2004), pp. 299-317

Martin, Dennis – ‘Schools of the Prophets: Shepherds and Scholars in New England Puritanism’  Historical Reflections / Réflexions Historiques, Vol. 5, No. 1 (Summer/Eté 1978), pp. 41-80

Maitland, David J. – ‘Puritans and University Reform’  Journal of Presbyterian History (1962-1985), Vol. 43, No. 2 (JUNE 1965), pp. 100-123

Scharlemann, Robert – ‘Theology in Church and University: The Post-Reformation Development’  Church History, Vol. 33, No. 1 (Mar., 1964), pp. 23-33

Grendler, Paul – ‘The Universities of the Renaissance and Reformation’  Renaissance Quarterly, Vol. 57, No. 1 (Spring, 2004), pp. 1-42

Broeyer, F.G.M. – ‘Theological Education at the Dutch Universities in the Seventeenth Century: Four Professors on their Ideal of the Curriculum’  Nederlands archief voor kerkgeschiedenis / Dutch Review of Church History, Vol. 85 (2005), pp. 115-132

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Books

Hoyle, David – Reformation and Religious Identity in Cambridge, 1590-1644  in History of the University of Cambridge  (Boydell Press, 2007)  266 pp.  Table of Contents

Scotland

Lindseth, Erik Lars – Evolution of Protestant Ideas and the Humanist Academic Tradition in Scotland: with special reference to Scandinavian/Lutheran Influences   (Univ. of Edinburgh, 1991)

Gellera, Giovanni – Natural Philosophy in the Graduation Theses of the Scottish Universities in the first half of the Seventeenth Century  (Univ. of Glasgow, 2012)

Abstract: “The graduation theses of the Scottish universities in the first half of the seventeenth century are at the crossroads of philosophical and historical events of fundamental importance: Renaissance and Humanist philosophy, Scholastic and modern philosophy, Reformation and Counter-reformation, the rise of modern science…  Graduation theses adhere[d] to the Scholastic tradition, especially Scotism, while being innovative in their opposition to Catholic forms of Scholasticism.”

Hannam, James – Teaching Natural Philosophy and Mathematics at Oxford and Cambridge 1500-1570  (Univ. of Cambridge, 2008)

Lindseth, Erik Lars – Evolution of Protestant ideas and the Humanist Academic Tradition in Scotland: with Special Reference to Scandinavian/Lutherian Influences  (Univ. of Edinburgh, 1991)

Macfarlane, Kirsten – Hugh Broughton (1549-1612): Scholarship, Controversy and the English Bible  Ref  (Univ. of Oxford, 2017)

Abstract: “There is still a broad assumption that Reformed beliefs about scripture were incompatible with the most advanced biblical scholarship. This thesis questions such assumptions…  By demonstrating that it was possible to produce innovative and influential work without challenging and indeed, while endorsing the principles of Reformed scripturalism, this thesis disputes current teleological presumptions about the development of modern, historical biblical criticism.”

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On the Method & Generas of Reformed Scholasticism

Willen, Diane – ‘Thomas Gataker and the Use of Print in the English Godly Community’  Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 70, No. 3 (September 2007), pp. 343-364

Goudriaan, Aza – ‘Athanasius in Reformed Protestantism: Some Aspects of Reception History (1527—1607)’  Church History and Religious Culture, Vol. 90, No. 2/3, Athanasius of Alexandria New Perspectives on his Theology and Asceticism (2010), pp. 257-276

Faber, Riemer – ‘The “Synopsis Purioris Theologiae (1625)”: Aspects of Composition, Content, and Context’  Church History and Religious Culture, Vol. 92, No. 4 (2012), pp. 499-501

Faber, Riemer – ‘Scholastic Continuities in the Reproduction of Classical Sources in the “Synopsis Purioris Theologiae”‘  Church History and Religious Culture, Vol. 92, No. 4 (2012), pp. 561-579

te Velde, Roelf Theodoor – Paths Beyond Tracing Out: the Connection of Method and Content in the Doctrine of God, examined in Reformed Orthodoxy, Karl Barth, and the Utrecht School  (Theological Univ. of Kampen, 2010)

Abstract: “The first part joins the revived interest in Reformed scholastic theology, and attempts to discover the inner dynamics of this allegedly dry and rigid, Aristotelian theology…  In the third part, a first comprehensive description and analysis of the efforts of the so-called Utrecht School is provided.  The final chapter draws some lines for developing a Reformed doctrine of God in the 21st century.”

Sinnema, Donald & Henk van den Belt – ‘The “Synopsis Purioris Theologiae (1625)” as a Disputation Cycle’  Church History and Religious Culture, Vol. 92, No. 4 (2012), pp. 505-537

Burton, Simon James Gowan – Hallowing of Logic: the Trinitarian method of Richard Baxter’s Methodus Theologiae  (Univ. of Edinburgh, 2011)

Abstract: “…there have been no major studies of him with respect to the renewed paradigm of Protestant Scholasticism and none at all of his Methodus Theologiae (1681), which represents the fruit of a lifetime of theological reflection and study and which is arguably, in both scope and vision, one of the last great Summas of English scholastic divinity…  Baxter‟s thought has pronounced Scotist and Nominalist accents.  His Scotism in particular runs deep and has strong ties with his Trinitarian thought, which is especially significant in light of the recent increasingly vocal discussions of the Scotist character of Protestant Scholasticism.”

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Bios

Articles

Sellin, Paul – ‘Puritan and Anglican: A Dutch Perspective’  Studies in Philology,
Vol. 65, No. 5 (Oct., 1968), pp. 804-815  About Daniel Heinsius (1580-1655).

Hofmeyr, J.W. – ‘Johannes Hoornbeeck, a monumental 17th century Dutch theologian: continuities in his thinking on doctrine and life’  Acta Theologica, 2016, pp. 19-48, Vol. 36, Issue 2

Letham, Robert – ‘Amandus Polanus: A Neglected Theologian?’  The Sixteenth Century Journal, Vol. 21, No. 3 (Autumn, 1990), pp. 463-476

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Book

Coffey, John – John Goodwin and the Puritan Revolution  (Boydell Press, 2006)  350 pp.  Table of contents

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Personal / Identity

Muller, Johannes – Ch. 15, ‘Permeable Memories: Family History and the Diaspora of Southern Netherlandish Exiles in the Seventeenth Century’  in eds. Kuijpers, Pollmann, Muller & van der Steen, Memory before Modernity: Practices of Memory in Early Modern Europe  (Brill, 2013), pp. 283-296

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The Decline of Reformed Scholasticism

Articles

Switzerland

Klauber, Martin – ‘Between Protestant Orthodoxy and Rationalism: Fundamental Articles in the Early Career of Jean LeClerc’  Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 54, No. 4 (Oct., 1993), pp. 611-636

Klauber, Martin – ‘Reason, Revelation, and Cartesianism: Louis Tronchin and Enlightened Orthodoxy in Late Seventeenth-Century Geneva’  Church History,
Vol. 59, No. 3 (Sep., 1990), pp. 326-339

Klauber, Martin – ‘The Drive toward Protestant Union in Early Eighteenth-Century Geneva: Jean-Alphonse Turrettini on the “Fundamental Articles” of the Faith’  Church History, Vol. 61, No. 3 (Sep., 1992), pp. 334-349

Sorkin, David – ‘Geneva’s “Enlightened Orthodoxy”: The Middle Way of Jacob Vernet (1698-1789)’  Church History, Vol. 74, No. 2 (Jun., 2005), pp. 286-305

Krop, Henri Adrien – ‘”Fides et Ratio”: An Early Enlightenment Defence of Non-confessional Religion by Poiret and his Circle’  Church History and Religious Culture, Vol. 90, No. 1 (2010), pp. 47-67

Poiret (1646-1719) was a prominent 17th century French mystic and Christian philosopher.

Whelan, Ruth – ‘From Christian Apologetics to Enlightened Deism: The Case of Jacques Abbadie (1656-1727)’  The Modern Language Review, Vol. 87, No. 1 (Jan., 1992), pp. 32-40

Hunter, Ian – ‘Christian Thomasius and the Desacralization of Philosophy’  Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 61, No. 4 (Oct., 2000), pp. 595-616

Calinger, Ronald – ‘The Newtonian-Wolffian Controversy: 1740-1759’  Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 30, No. 3 (Jul. – Sep., 1969), pp. 319-330

Hamilton, Alastair – ”From a Closet at Utrecht’: Adriaan Reland and Islam’
Nederlands archief voor kerkgeschiedenis / Dutch Review of Church History,
Vol. 78, No. 2 (1998), pp. 243-250

Reland (1676-1718) was a professor of Oriental languages and sacred antiquities at Utrecht.

van den Berg, J. – ‘Between Platonism and Enlightenment: Simon Patrick (1625-1707) and his Place in the Latitudinarian Movement’  Dutch Review of Church History, Vol. 68, No. 2 (1988), pp. 164-179

van Eijnatten, Joris – ‘Gerard Noodt’s Standing in the Eighteenth-Century Dutch Debates on Religious Freedom’  Dutch Review of Church History, Vol. 79, No. 1 (1999), pp. 74-98

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Books

Griesel, Abraham Jacobus – John Edwards of Cambridge (1637-1716): A reassessment of his location within the later Stuart Church of England  (Univ. of Cambridge, 2020)

Abstract:  “Its central thesis is that, contrary to the claims of older scholarship, Edwards was not a marginalized figure in the Church of England on account of his ‘Calvinism’.  Instead, this study demonstrates that Edwards was recognized in his own day and in the immediately following generations as one of the preeminent conforming divines of the period, and that his theological and polemical works, despite some Arminian opposition, enjoyed a very positive reception among significant segments of the established Church’s clergy, many of whom shared his Reformed doctrinal convictions.  Finally, this study problematizes scholarly depictions of the later Stuart Church of England as having developed a fairly homogeneous ‘Anglican’ theological identity, and argues instead that the established Church in this period was rather variegated in terms of theological doctrine, churchmanship, and politics.”

Arnold, J.W. – The Reformed Theology of Benjamin Keach (1640-1704)  (Oxford Univ., 2010)

Abstract: “Benjamin Keach, the most prolific Particular Baptist theologian of the seventeenth century, described himself as a defender of ‘Reformed Orthodoxy’.  Despite this self-identification, modern scholarship has largely relegated Keach to a self-educated dissenting pastor whose major achievement could be found in his controversial support of hymn singing…  This work fills that void by reviewing Keach’s own understanding of the term ‘Reformed Orthodoxy’, reconstructing Keach’s connections both in the personal contacts available in dissenting London and Buckinghamshire and in the books at his disposal, examining the major aspects of his theology, and placing that theology within the spectrum of Reformed Orthodoxy.”

Whelan, Raymond M. – An Irish Scholastic?: the Public Identity of Archbishop William King (1650-1729) of Dublin  (Univ. of Aberdeen, 2015)

Abstract: “This thesis will situate King ecclesiastically, politically and philosophically to illustrate his tripartite identity. It will also argue that King was a late Scholastic thinker and not an early enlightenment philosopher, as has been previously assumed. The main methodological element present in his work was Scholasticism and throughout the thesis this will be proven to be correct.”

Wolfe, Stephen Michael – John Witherspoon and Reformed Orthodoxy: Reason, Revelation, and the American Founding  Masters thesis  (LSU, 2016)

Abstract: “The dominant view in the literature is that Witherspoon’s view and use of natural theology, natural law, reason and philosophy indicate a compromise or inconsistency with his otherwise theological Reformed orthodoxy—a move towards a type of “enlightened orthodoxy” or “Christian rationalism.”  After reviewing the primary and secondary sources, I contend that the literature is in need of significant correction. I provide here both a corrective and contribute to the literature by showing that Witherspoon’s thought on these subjects—which, broadly speaking, concerns the relationship of reason to revelation—is consistent with Reformed orthodoxy.”

Park, Hong-Gyu – Grace and Nature in the Theology of John Gill (1697-1771)  (Univ. of Aberdeen, 2001)

The conclusion of this dissertation has since been challenged by Dr. Richard Muller, that Gill manifested a shift away from reformed scholasticism.

Abstract: “In this process, we seek to prove that Gill maintained the typical Reformed balance between the sovereign grace of God and human responsibility, or between grace and nature, throughout his whole theological system. Finally, it identifies Gill as a Reformed orthodox theologian rather than as a High or Hyper-Calvinist.”

Spaans, Joke & Jetze Touber – Enlightened Religion: From Confessional Churches to Polite Piety in the Dutch Republic  (Brill, 2019)  Table of Contents

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Anglicanism

Miller, Charles – Richard Hooker and the Vision of God: Exploring the Origins of ‘Anglicanism’  (James Clarke & Co Ltd, 2013)  350 pp.  Table of contents

Shuger, Debora – ‘A Protesting Catholic Puritan in Elizabethan England’  Journal of British Studies, Vol. 48, No. 3 (Jul., 2009), pp. 587-630

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Pastoral

Hildersham

Pfister, Ulrich – ‘Pastors and Priests in the Early Modern Grisons [Switzerland]: Organized Profession or Side Activity’  Central European History, Vol. 33, No. 1 (2000), pp. 41-65

Winship, Michael P. – ‘Weak Christians, Backsliders, and Carnal Gospelers: Assurance of Salvation and the Pastoral Origins of Puritan Practical Divinity in the 1580s’  Church History, Vol. 70, No. 3 (Sep., 2001), pp. 462-481

O’Banion, Patrick – ‘Jerome Zanchi, the Application of Theology, and the Rise of the English Practical Divinity Tradition’  Renaissance and Reformation, New Series, vol. 29, No. 2/3, Special issue, Early Modern God (Spring/Summer, 2005), pp. 97-120

Roberts, S. Bryn – Puritanism and the Pursuit of Happiness: The Ministry and Theology of Ralph Venning, c.1621-1674  (Boydell Press, 2015)  224 pp.

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Missions

Noorlander, D.L. – ‘”For the Maintenance of the True Religion”: Calvinism and the Directors of the Dutch West India Company’  The Sixteenth Century Journal,
Vol. 44, No. 1 (Spring 2013), pp. 73-95

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Islam

Loop, Jan – ‘Johann Heinrich Hottinger (1620—1667) and the “Historia Orientalis [History of the Orient]”‘  Church History and Religious Culture, Vol. 88, No. 2 (2008), pp. 169-203

“…Hottinger’s Historia Orientalis (1651, 2nd ed. 1660) is one of the most significant contributions to the history of Islam to have been published in the seventeenth century.”

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Philosophy

Sytsma, David S. – ‘Calvin, Daneau, and “Physica Mosaica [Mosaic Physics]”: Neglected Continuities at the Origins of an Early Modern Tradition’  Church History and Religious Culture, Vol. 95, No. 4 (2015), pp. 457-476

Mangold, Matthias – ‘Salomon van Til (1643—1713): His Appropriation of Cartesian Tenets in His Compendium of Natural Theology’  Church History and Religious Culture, Vol. 94, No. 3 (2014), pp. 337-357

Rehnman, Sebastian – ‘Theistic Metaphysics and Biblical Exegesis: Francis Turretin on the Concept of God’  Religious Studies, Vol. 38, No. 2 (Jun., 2002), pp. 167-186

Gellera, Giovanni – ‘Reformed Scholasticism in 17th Century Scottish philosophy’  in Alexander Broadie, Scottish Philosophy in the Seventeenth Century  (2020)

Gellera, Giovanni – ‘The Philosophy of Robert Forbes: A Scottish Scholastic Response to Cartesianism’  Journal of Scottish Philosophy 11(2) (Sept., 2013): 191-211

Abstract: “In the second half of the seventeenth century, philosophy teaching in the Scottish universities gradually moved from scholasticism to Cartesianism.  Robert Forbes, regent at Marischal College and King’s College, Aberdeen, was a strenuous opponent of Descartes.  The analysis of the philosophy of Forbes and of his teacher Patrick Gordon sheds light on the relationship between Scottish Reformed scholasticism and the reception of Descartes in Scotland.”

Gellera, Giovanni – ‘Natural Philosophy in Spanish Scholasticism’  in ed. Braun H.E., De Bom E., Companion to the Spanish Scholastics

Gellera, Giovanni – ‘Robertson’s Philosophical Theses (1596): between late Renaissance and early Modern Scholasticism’  eds. Alexander Broadie & J.S. Reid, Philosophical Discourse in Seventeenth-Century Scotland: Key Texts  (The Scottish History Society)

Woolford, Thomas – Natural Theology and Natural Philosophy in the Late Renaissance  (Univ. of Cambridge, 2012)

Levitin, Dmitri – ‘Rethinking English Physico-Theology: Samuel Parker’s “Tentamina de Deo” (1665)’  Early Science and Medicine, Vol. 19, No. 1 (2014), pp. 28-75

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“The mixture of those things by speech which by nature are divided, is the mother of all error. To take away therefore that error which confusion breedeth, distinction is requisite. Rightly to distinguish is by conceit of mind to sever things different in nature, and to discern wherein they differ.”

Richard Hooker
Lawes of Ecclesiasticall Politie III.3.1

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