Reformation & Puritan Bible Commentaries: Old Testament Historical Books

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Reformation & Puritan Bible Commentaries

Bible Commentaries

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⇒   The Poetic Books

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Subsections

Reformation & Puritan Commentaries on:

The Whole Bible, the Whole OT & Whole NT

Commentaries in Latin:

Whole Bible Commentaries

Whole Old Testament Commentaries

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Order of Contents

Pentateuch  8
.      Genesis  20+
.      Exodus  6
.              The 10 Commandments
.      Leviticus  8+
.      Numbers  2
.      Deuteronomy  2
Joshua – Ruth  7
Samuel – Kings  9
Ezra – Esther  4

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The Whole Pentateuch

1600’s

Babington, Gervase – Certain Plain, Brief and Comfortable Notes upon the 5 Books of Moses: Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy  also in Works, d. 1610

*  “Our copy is in the old Black Letter.  It contains little to repay the student for toiling through the old-fashioned expressions.” – Spurgeon

Ainsworth, Henry – Annotations upon the Five Books of Moses, the Book of the Psalms, and Song of Songs, or, Canticles, vols. 1, 2  d. 1622,  vol. 1 goes up through Num. 11

***  ‘Thoroughly learned.  Though old, not out of date.’ – Spurgeon

‘Ainsworth was a celebrated scholar and an excellent divine.  His uncommon skill in Hebrew learning, and his excellent commentaries on the Scripture are held in high reputation to this day.’ – Benjamin Brook, ‘Lives of the Puritans’

Jackson, Arthur – A Help for the Understanding of the Holy Scripture, containing certain short notes of Exposition upon the Five Books of Moses  1643

Jackson (1593-1666) was a reformed puritan.  

Wright, Abraham – A Practical Commentary or Exposition upon the Pentateuch  1662

** ‘An extremely rare old book.  The style and matter are after the manner of Christopher Ness [see here].  Wright [1611-1690] does not comment upon every verse, but after indicating the run of the chapter gives little sermons upon the more salient points.  He is very quaint and pithy.’ – Spurgeon

‘…which appear to have been the result of his pulpit expositions to his people.  Valuable his works would be if there were no better, but they are not comparable to others already and afterwards mentioned.  You can do without him, but he is a reputable author.’ – Spurgeon

Kidder, Richard – Commentary on the First Five Books of Moses, vol. 1 (Gen.-Ex.), 2 (Lev.-Dt.)  1694

Kidder (1634-1703) was an Anglican bishop.

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The Judicial Laws

Weemes, John – An Explication of the Judicial Laws of Moses  1632  260 pp.

Weemes (1579-1636) was an early Scottish covenanter and prolific Hebrew scholar.

“He was well acquainted with the original Scriptures, with Jewish manners and antiquities, and with the best mode of interpreting the Bible.  The style is quaint, but always intelligible.” – Orme

*  “This contains many useful and curious things, together with fancies and rabbinical trifles.  Weemse may generally be bought very cheap, and we should think his work is very little read or cared for.” – Spurgeon

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The Ceremonial Laws

Guild, William – Moses Unveiled: or Those Figures which Served unto the Pattern and shadow of heavenly things, pointing out the Messiah Christ Jesus, briefly explained; Whereunto is added the harmony of all the prophets, breathing with one mouth the mystery of his coming, and of that redemption which by his death He was to accomplish  1620  62 pp.

Guild was a Scottish covenanter.

Weemes, John – An Explanation of the Ceremonial Laws of Moses  1632  300 pp.

Weemes (1579-1636) was an early Scottish covenanter and prolific Hebrew scholar.

“He was well acquainted with the original Scriptures, with Jewish manners and antiquities, and with the best mode of interpreting the Bible.  The style is quaint, but always intelligible.” – Orme

*  “This contains many useful and curious things, together with fancies and rabbinical trifles.  Weemse may generally be bought very cheap, and we should think his work is very little read or cared for.” – Spurgeon


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Genesis

1600’s

Willet, Andrew – A Sixfold Commentary upon the Two First Books of Moses, being Genesis & Exodus  d. 1621

Willet (1562–1621)

**‘This work is called by its author a Hexapla, because he treats his subject under six heads, giving ‘a sixfold use of every chapter, showing:

1. The method of argument;
2. The diverse readings;
3. The explanation of difficult questions and doubtful places;  
4. The places of doctrine;  
5. Places of confutation;  
6. Moral observations.’

Willet is tedious reading; his method hampers him.  In all his Commentaries he lumbers along in his six-wheeled wagon.’ – Spurgeon

Whatley, William – Prototypes, or, The Primary Precedent Presidents out of the book of Genesis showing, the good and bad things they did and had practically applied to our Information and Reformation  1640

** ‘A queer old book.  The oddity of the title is born out by the singularity of the matter.  It does not expound each verse; but certain incidents are dwelt upon.’

Richardson, John – Annotations on Genesis  d. 1654  67 pp.

Richardson was reformed and printed this only a few years after the second edition of the English Annotations (which were nicknamed the Westminster Annotations as 6 of the 11 commentators were Westminster divines), to which it was designed as a supplement.

On Richardson’s brief commentary on the O.T.:  **  ‘Of secondary importance, and very short; yet good.  Frequently bound up with Leigh [as Edward Leigh wrote a commentary on the whole N.T.].’ – Spurgeon

Hughes, George – An Analytical Exposition of the Whole First Book of Moses, Called Genesis, and of 23 Chapters of his Second Book, called Exodus…  1672

Hughes (1603-1667) was a puritan.

*** – ‘The deductions which Hughes draws from the text are of the nature of homiletical hints, and for this reason he will be a treasure to the minister.  He belongs to the noble army of Puritans.’ – Spurgeon

Poole, Matthew – Critical Synopsis of the Bible: Genesis, 3 vols.  Buy  †1679

This is different and much larger than Poole’s Annotations on Scripture.  Here Poole gives something of a history of interpretation (from Jewish writers until Christian interpreters of Poole’s own day) on every verse of the Bible.

‘…you will find in Poole’s Synopsis a marvelous collection of all the wisdom and folly of the critics.  It is a large cyclopedia worthy of the days when theologians could be cyclopean, and had not shrunk from folios to octavos.  Query—a query for which I will not demand an answer—has one of you beaten the dust from the venerable copy of Poole which loads our library shelves?  Yet as Poole spent no less than ten years in compiling it, it should be worthy of your frequent notice—ten years, let me add, spent in Amsterdam in exile for the truth’s sake from his native land.  His work is based on an earlier compilation entitled Critic Sacri, containing the concentrated light of a constellation of learned men who have never been excelled in any age or country.’ – Spurgeon

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Sections of Genesis

Lightfoot, John – A Few and New Observations upon the Book of Genesis  8 pp. in two volume works, vol. 1, p. 691 ff.

Le Clerk, Jean – 12 Dissertations out of Monsieur Le Clerk’s Genesis  1696  360 pp.

The dissertations are: (1) Hebrew tongue, (2) Manner of interpreting the Bible, (3) Author of the Penteteuch, (4) Temptation of Eve by the Serpent, (5) Flood, (6) Confusion of languages, (7) Original of Circumcision, (8) Divine appearances in the O.T., (9) Subversion of Sodom, (10) Pillar of Salt, (11) Coming of Shiloh, (12) Several obscure texts explained.

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Chapters in Genesis

Chs. 1-22

Calvin, John

Sermons on Genesis, chs. 1-11, 12-22  Buy

These sermons are different from his commentary on Genesis.

Sermons on Melchizedek and Abraham  Buy  on Gen. 14, 15, 22

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Chs. 1-14

Gibbens, Nicholas – Questions & Disputations Concerning the Holy Scripture wherein are contained, brief, faithful and sound Expositions of the most difficult and hardest places…  1602

*‘In his own fashion this antique writer tries to answer curious questions which are suggested by Genesis.  His day is over.’

Luther, Martin – Lectures on Genesis, vols. 1 (ch. 1-5), 2 (6-14), 3 (15-20), 4 (21-25), 5 (26-30), 6 (31-37), 7 (38-44), 8 (45-50)  Buy  ed. Henry Cole

** ‘Cole made a choice selection.  Luther left four volumes upon Genesis in Latin.  How these Reformers worked!’ – Spurgeon

Clapham, Henoch – Commentary on the First Fourteen Chapters of Genesis  †1614  being entitled, Bibliotheca Theologica: or, a Library Theological...  (Amsterdam, 1597)

Clapham (fl.1585-1614) was a puritan and a pastor of an English-speaking congregation in Amsterdam.

* “Clapham was a voluminous author of very remarkable attainments.  He wrote also on the first fourteen chapters of Genesis.  This work [on the Song of Solomon] is rare as angel’s visits.” – Spurgeon

Ross, Alexander – An Exposition on the Fourteen First Chapters of Genesis, by way of question and answer, Collected out of ancient and recent writers: both briefly and subtilly propounded and expounded  1626

* – “A very scarce catechism by that Scotch divine who is mentioned in Hudibras [p. 56] in the lines:

‘There was an ancient sound philosopher
That had read Alexander Ross over.’”

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Chs. 1-11

Bunyan, John – An Exposition of the First Ten Chapters of Genesis  in Works, vol. 2

*  “Allegorical and spiritual.  Bunyan’s characteristics are very prominently manifest.” – Spurgeon

Henry, Philip – An Exposition, with Practical Observations, upon the First Eleven Chapters of the Book of Genesis  d. 1696

**‘Interesting as the exposition of Matthew Henry’s father, taken down from his lips at family prayer by Matthew his son.  This probably suggested the famous Commentary [of Matthew Henry].’ – Spurgeon

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Chs. 1-5

Needler, Benjamin – Expository Notes, with Practical Observations, towards the opening of the Five First Chapters of the First Book of Moses  1655

* ‘Needler was one of the eminent divines who took part in the famous [puritan] Morning Exercises [at Cripplegate].  The little work is a curiosity, but nothing more.’ – Spurgeon

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Chs. 1-3

Oecolampadius, Johannes – An Exposition of Genesis  Buy  These are his lectures on Gen. 1-3

Oecolampadius (1482–1531) was a German/Swiss reformer, a co-worker with Erasmus and Zwingli, and as was influential upon Bullinger, Calvin and others.

White, John – A Commentary upon the Three First Chapters of the First Book of Moses called Genesis  1656  †1648

White (1575–1648) was a Westminster divine and was influential for the  Massachusetts Bay Company settling in America, though he never made the trip across to the New World.

** “A puritan divine, called ‘The Patriarch of Dorchester’”  “A folio upon three chapters!  There were giants in those days.  Manton says, ‘To speak of the worth of the author is needless, his praise being already in all of the churches,’ and he adds that he had been greatly refreshed by the perusal of this book.” – Spurgeon

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Chs. 16, 22, 28, 45

Shute, Josias – Sarah and Hagar, or Genesis the 16th chapter opened in Twenty Sermons  1649  248 pp.

Shute was a reformed Anglican.

** – ‘Above three and thirty years rector of St. Mary, Woolnoth.’  ‘In shape, the editor tells us, ‘this book is somewhat slender, like the encouragements of learning.’  He informs us that the author was ‘one of the five famous brother-preachers, somewhat like the five fingers on the right hand of fellowship;’ and that Chrysostom did so much lie in his bosom that he became like him in his flowing style and golden eloquence.  He writes like a learned man, and treats the Scriptures as if ‘each book were a course, each chapter a Benjamin’s mess, and every verse a morsel of the food of angels.”

Beza, Theodore – A Tragedy of Abraham’s Sacrifice  (Gen. 22)  1575  

Cowper, William – Jacob’s Wrestling with God  1608  148 pp.  on Gen. 28

Cowper was a Scottish bishop.

Rollinson, Francis – Twelve Prophetical Legacies; or, Twelve Sermons upon Jacob’s Last Will, recorded in the 45th chapter of Genesis  1612

* ‘Old-fashioned learning, and singular remarks; its rarity is no great calamity.’


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Exodus

1600’s

Babington, Gervase – Certain Plain, Brief and Comfortable Notes upon Exodus & Leviticus  also in Works, d. 1610

Willet, Andrew – A Sixfold Commentary upon the two first Books of Moses, being Genesis and Exodus  d. 1621

Willet (1562–1621)

** – ‘This work is called by its author [1562-1621] a Hexapla, because he treats his subject under six heads, giving ‘a sixfold use of every chapter, showing:

1. The method of argument;
2. The diverse readings;
3. The explanation of difficult questions and doubtful places;  
4. The places of doctrine;  
5. Places of confutation;  
6. Moral observations.’

Willet is tedious reading; his method hampers him.  In all his Commentaries he lumbers along in his six-wheeled wagon.’  ‘Full, exhaustive, and exhausting.’ – Spurgeon

Lightfoot, John – An Handful of Gleanings out of the Book of Exodus  26 pp. in his two volume works, vol. 1, p. 699-725

Poole, Matthew – Critical Synopsis of the Bible: Exodus, 2 vols.  Buy  †1679

This is different and much larger than Poole’s Annotations on Scripture.  Here Poole gives something of a history of interpretation (from Jewish writers until Christian interpreters of Poole’s own day) on every verse of the Bible.

‘…you will find in Poole’s Synopsis a marvelous collection of all the wisdom and folly of the critics.  It is a large cyclopedia worthy of the days when theologians could be cyclopean, and had not shrunk from folios to octavos.  Query—a query for which I will not demand an answer—has one of you beaten the dust from the venerable copy of Poole which loads our library shelves?  Yet as Poole spent no less than ten years in compiling it, it should be worthy of your frequent notice—ten years, let me add, spent in Amsterdam in exile for the truth’s sake from his native land.  His work is based on an earlier compilation entitled Critic Sacri, containing the concentrated light of a constellation of learned men who have never been excelled in any age or country.’ – Spurgeon

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Parts of Exodus

Hughes, George – An Analytical Exposition of the Whole First Book of Moses, called Genesis, and of 23 chapters of his second book, called Exodus…  1672

Hughes (1603-1667) was a puritan.

** – ‘The deductions which Hughes draws from the text are of the nature of homiletical hints, and for this reason he will be a treasure to the minister.  He belongs to the noble army of Puritans.’ – Spurgeon

Jackson, Thomas – Paraphrase on the Eleven First Chapters of Exodus, with Annotations, etc. in Works, vol. 9, p. 384 ff. d. 1640  Thomas Jackson (to be distinguished from Arthur Jackson) was an Arminian Anglican.

– ‘George Herbert set great store by Dr. Jackson’s writings, for he said, ‘I bless God for the confirmation Dr. Jackson has given me in the Christian religion, against the Atheist, Jew and Socinian, and in the Protestant against Rome.’  It would hardly repay a student to purchase three folio volumes to obtain the small portion allotted to his Paraphrase.  So far as commenting is concerned it is not important.’ – Spurgeon

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Expositions of the 10 Commandments

The following page has works on it from throughout Church history.  See the works from the 1500’s & 1600’s sections under the lager sections of: Shorter Works, Medium Length Works & Longer Works.

Expositions of the 10 Commandments


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Leviticus

1600’s

Babington, Gervase – Certain Plain, Brief and Comfortable Notes upon Exodus & Leviticus  also in Works, d. 1610

Willet, Andrew – A Six-fold Commentary upon the Third Book of Moses, called Leviticus  d. 1621

Willet (1562–1621)

**  “Plodding along with his six-fold load, Willet gives us a comparison of ten versions, ‘handles well nigh two thousand theological questions,’ and quotes ‘above forty authors, old and new.’  He sums up all preceding commentaries, both Protestant and Romish.” – Spurgeon

Poole, Matthew – Critical Synopsis of the Bible: Leviticus  Buy  †1679

This is different and much larger than Poole’s Annotations on Scripture.  Here Poole gives something of a history of interpretation (from Jewish writers until Christian interpreters of Poole’s own day) on every verse of the Bible.

‘…you will find in Poole’s Synopsis a marvelous collection of all the wisdom and folly of the critics.  It is a large cyclopedia worthy of the days when theologians could be cyclopean, and had not shrunk from folios to octavos.  Query—a query for which I will not demand an answer—has one of you beaten the dust from the venerable copy of Poole which loads our library shelves?  Yet as Poole spent no less than ten years in compiling it, it should be worthy of your frequent notice—ten years, let me add, spent in Amsterdam in exile for the truth’s sake from his native land.  His work is based on an earlier compilation entitled Critic Sacri, containing the concentrated light of a constellation of learned men who have never been excelled in any age or country.’ – Spurgeon

Patrick, Simon – A Commentary upon the 3rd Book of Moses, called Leviticus  1698

Patrick (1626-1707) was an Arminian, Latitudinarian Anglican.

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Chapters in Leviticus

Ch. 1

Clapham, Henoch – A Manual of the Bible’s Doctrine for Law & Gospel, Letter & Spirit, sign & thing signified, reduced to the First Chapter of Leviticus: Wherewith (occasionally) be plainly considered and briefly concluded, the most main questions wherewith the Christian churches be combied  (London, 1606)

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Ch. 14

Worden, Thomas – The Leper, and the Leper’s House, Cleansed, being an Exposition upon some part of the 14th Chapter of Leviticus; the Mystery of which is Explained and Applied to the state and condition of a Sinner’s Becoming a Saint, with profitable uses and applications, as also what chapter may be applied to, as to the cleansing or destroying of any particular church of Christ in and under the time of the Gospel…  (London, 1695)

We are unable to find any information about Worden.

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On Figures and Types

Guild, William – Moses Unveiled: or Those Figures which Served unto the Pattern and shadow of heavenly things, pointing out the Messiah Christ Jesus, briefly explained; Whereunto is added the harmony of all the prophets, breathing with one mouth the mystery of his coming, and of that redemption which by his death He was to accomplish  1620  62 pp.

Guild was a Scottish covenanter.

Mather, Samuel – The Figures or Types of the Old Testament, by which Christ and the Heavenly things of the gospel were preached and shadowed to the people of God of old, explained and improved in sundry sermons  1705  †1671  570 pp.

**‘Though this is a work upon all the types, it contains so much instructive matter upon the Levitical sacrifices that we cannot forbear mentioning it here.  It is one of the old standard books of our fathers.’ – Spurgeon

Keach, Benjamin – Tropologia, a Key to Open Scripture Metaphors… together with Types of the Old Testament  d. 1704  Keach was a Baptist at the same church as Spurgeon would later minister at.

**  “This is a vast cyclopedia of types and metaphors of all sorts, and was once very popular.  It is a capital book, though too often the figures not only run on all-fours but on as many legs as a centipede.  It is not strictly upon Leviticus, but we felt bound to insert it in this place.” – Spurgeon


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Numbers

Attersoll, William – A Commentary upon the Fourth Book of Moses, called Numbers  1618

** – ‘A stupendous work, well fitted to make a headstone for the author’s grave.  It is so huge that it might have been the work of a lifetime, and yet the same writer has also given us Philemon.  Think of 1271 folio pages on Numbers!’ – Spurgeon

Poole, Matthew – Critical Synopsis of the Bible: Numbers  Buy  †1679

This is different and much larger than Poole’s Annotations on Scripture.  Here Poole gives something of a history of interpretation (from Jewish writers until Christian interpreters of Poole’s own day) on every verse of the Bible.

‘…you will find in Poole’s Synopsis a marvelous collection of all the wisdom and folly of the critics.  It is a large cyclopedia worthy of the days when theologians could be cyclopean, and had not shrunk from folios to octavos.  Query—a query for which I will not demand an answer—has one of you beaten the dust from the venerable copy of Poole which loads our library shelves?  Yet as Poole spent no less than ten years in compiling it, it should be worthy of your frequent notice—ten years, let me add, spent in Amsterdam in exile for the truth’s sake from his native land.  His work is based on an earlier compilation entitled Critic Sacri, containing the concentrated light of a constellation of learned men who have never been excelled in any age or country.’ – Spurgeon


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Deuteronomy

Luther, Martin – Lectures on Deuteronomy  Buy  in Works, vol. 9

Calvin, John – Sermons on Deuteronomy  d. 1564

***‘This is not the same as that which is contained in the “Calvin Translation Society’s Commentaries.”  Everything that Calvin wrote by way of exposition is priceless; even those who differ from him in theology admit this.’ – Spurgeon


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The Historical Books

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Joshua

None

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Chapters in Joshua

Ch. 7

Burton, Henry – Israel’s Fast, or a Meditation upon the Seventh Chapter of Joshua, a fair precedent for these times  ([London, 1628])

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Judges

1500’s

Vermigli, Peter Martyr – A Most Fruitful and Learned Commentary on Judges  (London [1564])  under the title Most Fruitfull [and] learned co[m]mentaries of Doctor Peter Martir Vermil Florentine…

* ‘This would seem to be a profound work.  [Richard] Rogers says of Peter Martyr: ‘Few private men can understand his works, and few ministers who understand them can obtain them; nor if they can will they find in them much that will benefit their simple hearers.’  This has not been our experience with Peter Martyr’s works; on the contrary, we have read them with interest.’

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1600’s

Rogers, Richard – A Commentary upon the Whole Book of Judges, preached first and delivered in sundry lectures  EEBO  1615

***‘This for the puritan period is THE work upon Judges.  It is thoroughly plain and eminently practical.’ – Spurgeon

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Ruth

1500’s

Lavater, Ludwig – The Book of Ruth, Expounded in 28 Sermons  1586

Lavater was a Swiss reformed theologian.

* ‘Lavater was a reformer of high repute, son-in-law of Bullinger.  He wrote a curious work on spectres, and made a catalog of comets, thus showing himself to be both a philosopher and divine.  His book is seldom met with.’ – Spurgeon

Topsell, Edward – The Reward of Religion, Delivered in Sundry Lectures upon the Book of Ruth  GB  1596  304 pp.

Topsell (1572-1625) was an Anglican.

*** “A very choice old work.  [William] Attersol in his rhyming preface says of it:

‘Go little Book, display thy golden title,
(And yet not little though thou little be);
Little for price and yet in price not little,
Thine was the pain, the gain is ours I see:
(Although our gain thou deem’st no pain to thee).
If then, O reader, little pain thou take,
Thou greatest gain with smallest pain shall make.’” -Spurgeon

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1600’s

Bernard, Richard – Ruth’s Recompense, or a Commentary upon the Book of Ruth  1628  120 pp.

Bernard (1568-1641) was a puritan minister in England, and the predecessor of Richard Alleine. 

** – ‘Mr. Grosart is enthusiastic in his praise of this work, and says ‘that it abounds with apophthegms [concise sayings or maxims] and compressed thoughts.’  We defer to so high an authority, but we are not much fascinated by the book.’ – Spurgeon

Fuller, Thomas – A Commentary on Ruth; and, Notes upon Jonah  1650, † 1661

Fuller was a reformed Anglican.

** – ‘Not one of Fuller’s best; but still quaint and pithy, and lit up with flashes of his irrepressible wit.  The above works of Bernard and Fuller have been reprinted in Nichol’s Series of Commentaries, in one volume.’


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1 Samuel

Willet, Andrew – An Harmony upon the First Book of Samuel  1607

Willet (1562–1621)

*** – ‘The work continues the Hexapla to which we have referred…  It is unusually brief for the age of its composition, and full of variety.  Under every verse, and often clause of a verse, the learned author proposes a question, and proceeds to answer it.  These are such as the following: ‘What a daughter of Belial is?’  ‘Whether any may be said to sin with the will of God?’  ‘What doors of the house of Jehovah Samuel opened?’  ‘What is to be thought of Eli’s state before God?” – Spurgeon

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David

Marbeck, John – The Holy History of King David, wherein is chiefly learned these godly and wholesome lessons, that is, to have sure patience in persecution, due obedience to our prince without rebellion and also the true and most faithful dealings of friends. Drawn into English Meter for the Youth to Read  1579

*  “This is in English metre, and was written by the famous organist of the Royal Chapel in Windsor, in the reign of Henry VIII.  He narrowly escaped martyrdom.  His work entitled ‘Booke of Common Praier noted’, is the groundwork of the plain song used in our Cathedrals from the Reformation to the present day.  Marbeck’s History of David is very rare.  We cannot therefore set a price [at which it sells for].” – Spurgeon

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2 Samuel

1500’s

Calvin, John – Sermons on Second Samuel: Chapters 1-13  Buy

These sermons are different from his commentary.

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1600’s

Willet, Andrew – A Harmony upon the 2nd Book of Samuel  1614

Willet (1562–1621)

*** – ‘The work continues the Hexapla to which we have referred…  It is unusually brief for the age of its composition, and full of variety.  Under every verse, and often clause of a verse, the learned author proposes a question, and proceeds to answer it.  These are such as the following: ‘What a daughter of Belial is?’  ‘Whether any may be said to sin with the will of God?’  ‘What doors of the house of Jehovah Samuel opened?’  ‘What is to be thought of Eli’s state before God?” – Spurgeon

Guild, William – 2 Samuel  †1657

Guild (1586–1657) was a Scottish covenanter.

** – ‘The manuscript of this rare book was sent to Dr. John Owen by the widow of the author, with a letter of her own, informing him that her dying husband desired it to be so forwarded.  Dr. Owen says, that he found the treatise ‘written with perspicuity and clearness, handling a subject of great and delightful variety, with a choice mixture of spiritual, moral, and political observations, tempered by a good and sound judgment unto common capacities.’  We do not presume to criticize where Owen commends, but we should not have originated such a commendation.’ – Spurgeon

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1 Kings

None

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2 Kings

None

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Chapters in 2 Kings

Ch. 5

Rogers, Daniel – Naaman the Syrian, his Disease & Cure Discovering lively to the Reader the Spiritual Leprosy of Sin and Self-Love, together with the Remedies, viz. Self-Denial & Faith  1642

Rogers (1573-1652) was a reformed puritan.

*** – ‘A huge volume of 898 folio pages, almost large enough to have loaded one of Naaman’s mules.  It is a work which exhausts the subject and turns it to earnest evangelical uses.’ – Spurgeon

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Chs. 9-10

Lane, Edward – An Image of our Reforming Times: or, Jehu in his Proper Colors, Displayed in Some Exercitations on 2 Kings 9 & 10 chapters: setting forth the opportunity was given him to do his work in cause he had committed to him to manage. Also, his policy, zeal, profession, hypocrisy: with his sins, and their aggravations, reason for all this. In all which he is proved to be a particular character of our times: by which, as in a glass, we may see the state and condition we have brought ourselves into by our deviations.  Concluding with a word to Jehu, Jehonadah, his counselor, and the despised persecuted People of God  (London, 1654)

Lane (1605-1685) was a reformed, Anglican clergyman, who ‘seems to have been an exemplary parish clergyman’.

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1 Chronicles

None

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The Temple

Lee, Samuel – Orbis Miraculum, or, The Temple of Solomon Portrayed by Scripture-Light wherein all its famous buildings, the pompous worship of the Jews, with its attending rites and ceremonies, the several officers employed in that work, with their ample revenues, and the spiritual mysteries of the Gospel veiled under all, are treated at large  1659

Lee (1625–1691) was an English puritan academic and minister.

** ‘Of course, as will be inferred from its date, this work is of the antique order, but it is profoundly learned, and goes into architectural and ritualistic details, explaining them spiritually with much sweetness and suggestiveness.’ – Spurgeon

Bunyan, John – Solomon’s Temple Spiritualized, or Gospel Light Fetched out of the Temple at Jerusalem, to let us more easily into the Glory of New Testament Truths  †1688  140 pp.

** ‘A marvelous display of allegorizing genius: full of Gospel truth.  Bunyan hammers away at each type, but no one may call it tinkering.’ – Spurgeon

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2 Chronicles

None


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Ezra

None

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Chapters in Ezra

Leighton, Robert – A Fragment on Ezra 9  Buy  †1684  2 pp., in Works, vol. 4

Leighton was a very godly Scottish bishop.

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Nehemiah

Pilkington, James

A Godly Exposition of Nehemiah 1-5  d. 1576

Against the Gross Sin of Oppression, Taken out of the Exposition of Mr. James Pilkington upon the 5th Chapter of Nehemiah  in Two Godly and Fruitful Treatises of the Foul and Gross Sin of Oppression...  (Cambridge, 1585)  This is different than the work above.

Bishop Pilkington was one of the English reformers.

** – “Very old fashioned and singular, somewhat in the style of Latimer and perhaps a little coarser.  Pilington’s downright onslaughts upon the vices and follies of his times are fine instances of personal, faithful preaching; they are, however, so minutely descriptive of the manners which then prevailed that they are less useful now.  The style is cramped, and even grotesque, yet Pilkington is a grand old author.  He has only written upon five chapters.” – Spurgeon

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Esther

1500’s

Merlin, Pierre – A Most Plain and profitable Exposition of the book of Esther delivered in 26 Sermons  1599

Merlin (1533-1603) was reformed.

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1600’s

Cooper, Thomas – The Church’s Deliverance, containing Meditations and Short Notes upon the Book of Esther, in remembrance of the wonderful deliverance from the Gunpowder-Treason [Plot]  GB  1609

Cooper’s (fl.1609-1626) theological persuasion is unknown.

*“We have not been able to meet with this work.” – Spurgeon

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