Reformation & Puritan Bible Commentaries: Epistles & Revelation

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Reformation & Puritan Bible Commentaries

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Subsections

Reformation & Puritan Commentaries on:

The Whole Bible, the Whole OT & Whole NT

Commentaries in Latin:

Whole Bible Commentaries

Whole New Testament Commentaries

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Order of Contents

The Epistles  3
.       Romans  35
.       Corinthians  10+
     Galatians – Ephesians  12+
.       Philippians – Colossians  15
.       Thessalonians  20+
.       Timothy – Titus  8
.       Philemon – Hebrews  18
.       General Epistles  1
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     James  8
.                1-2 Peter  16
.                Letters of John  10
.                Jude  11
Revelation  72+

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On the Epistles

Dickson, David – An Exposition of all St. Paul’s Epistles together with an explanation of those other epistles of the apostles St. James, Peter, John & Jude, wherein the sense of every chapter and verse is analytically unfolded and the text enlightened  (Romans-Jude)  Buy  1659  

Dickson was a prominent Scottish covenanter.

*** – ‘Dickson is a writer after our own heart.  For preachers he is a great ally.  There is nothing brilliant or profound; but everything is clear and well arranged, and the unction runs down like the oil from Aaron’s head.  In this volume the observations are brief.’

Note that the Banner of Truth reprint contains Dickson’s commentary on less books than the original.

Fergusson, James – A Brief Exposition of Galatians, Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians and the Thessalonians  Buy  1656-74

Fergusson was a Scottish covenanter.

*** – ‘He who possesses this work is rich.  The author handles his matter in the same manner as Hutcheson and Dickson, and he is of their class–a grand, gracious, savory divine.’

Whitby, Daniel – A Paraphrase & Commentary upon all the Epistles of the New Testament  (London [1700])

Whitby (1638–1726) was a strongly Arminian, Anglican minister who later gave evidence of Unitarian tendencies.


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Romans

1500’s

Colet, John – An Exposition on Romans  d. 1519  rep. 1874  

Colet was a reforming, English, humanist, Roman Catholic priest who was critical of the Church and was a friend of Erasmus.

Luther, Martin – PrefaceCommentary on Romans

Luther’s Preface was historically foundational to the Reformation.  Luther is good, but he cannot be relied upon in every area of Romans. 

Specifically he does not affirm the 3rd Use of the Law (that the Law is a guide to the Christian’s path) and he interprets the motif of the flesh vs. the spirit as the sinful inclinations of a man’s body vs. his spirit, whereas the scriptural phraseology denotes by ‘flesh’ man’s sinful body and soul together and by ‘spirit’, the influence of the Holy Spirit. 

For the latter interpretation, why it is correct, and the flow of thought in the passages (Rom. 6-8 especially), see the commentary of John Calvin.

“This indispensable work contains lectures which were first delivered to his students in 1515-16, and shows the process through which Luther went as he grappled with the problems of Roman dogma versus justification by faith.” – Cyril J. Barber

Tyndale, William – A Compendious Introduction, Prologue or Preface unto the Epistle of Paul to the Romans  1526  45 pp.

Vermigli, Peter Martyr – A Most Learned and Fruitful Commentary upon the Epistle of St. Paul to the Romans wherein are diligently and most profitably entreated all such matters and chief common places of religion touched in the same Epistle  ToC  d. 1562

**  “Being in black letter, and very long, few will ever read it; but it contains much that will repay the laborious book-worm.” – Spurgeon

Corro, Antonio – A Theological Dialogue, wherein the Epistle of St. Paul the Apostle to the Romans is Expounded  1575

Corro (1527-1591) was originally a Spanish monk who converted to protestantism and became a reformed professor of divinity at Oxford.  He wrote the first Spanish grammar in English.

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1600’s

Wilson, Thomas – A Commentary on Romans  1614

Wilson (1563-1622) was a reformed Anglican. 

**  “Intended for the less-instructed among the preacher’s hearers, and put into the form of a dialogue.  It is very solid, but does not contain much which is very striking or original.” – Spurgeon

Ferme, Charles – A Logical Analysis of Romans  PoD  †1617  

Ferme (1565-1617) was a reformed Scottish divine.

Willet, Andrew – A Six-fold Commentary upon Romans  1620

Willet (1562–1621)

**‘This work is called by its author [1562-1621] a Hexapla, because he treats his subject under six heads, giving ‘a sixfold use of every chapter, showing:

1. The method of argument;
2. The diverse readings;
3. The explanation of difficult questions and doubtful places;  
4. The places of doctrine;  
5. Places of confutation;  
6. Moral observations.’

Willet is tedious reading; his method hampers him.  In all his Commentaries he lumbers along in his six-wheeled wagon.’ – Spurgeon

Day, William – A Paraphrase & Commentary upon the Epistle of St. Paul to the Romans  1666

Day (d. 1684) was an Anglican.

Brown, John, of Wamphray – An Exposition of Romans with Large Practical Observations, Delivered in Several Lectures  Buy  †1679

Brown (1610-1679) was a late Scottish covenanter, exiled in Holland.

** – ‘By a Calvinist of the old school.  Heavy, perhaps; but precious.’ – Spurgeon

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Chapters in Romans

Sclater, William

A Key to the Key of Scripture, or an Exposition with Notes upon the Romans chs. 1-3  d. 1626

Sclater (1575-1626) was a reformed puritan.

***  “An antique, but precious book.” – Spurgeon

An Exposition with Notes, on the Whole Fourth Chapter to the Romans. Wherein the Grand Question of Justification by Faith Alone Without Works, is Controverted Stated, Cleared, and Fully Resolved

Lightfoot, John – Hebrew and Talmudical Exercitations upon Some Few Chapters of the Epistle to the Romans  on chs. 3, 8, 11

Lightfoot was a mid-1600’s reformed divine who was invited to the Westminster Assembly.  He mined the Jewish writings for anything and everything that may be of help in understanding the New Testament.  Here are his results.  This is the only work of its kind in English.

Parr, Elnathan – A Short View of the Epistle to the Romans 1-2:2, also in The Works  Buy  4th ed. 1651

Parr (1577-1622) was reformed.

***  “The style is faulty, but the matter is rich and full of suggestions.  We regret that the work is not complete, and is seldom to be met with except in fragments.” – Spurgeon

Manton, Thomas – 24 Sermons on Romans 6  d. 1677

Elton, Edward – The Complaint of a Sanctified Sinner Answered: or An Explanation of the Seventh Chapter of the Epistle of Saint Paul to the Romans, Delivered in Diverse Sermons  1618

Elton (1569-1624) was reformed.

***  “The style is plain and homely, but the matter is of the choicest kin.  This old folio is like an old skin bottle, with a rough exterior, but filled within with the product of the rarest vintage.  Such books as this we never tire of reading.” – Spurgeon

Sutton, Thomas – Lectures upon the Eleventh Chapter to the Romans  (London, 1632)

Sutton (1585–1623) was an Oxford graduate, English minister and divine.

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Romans 8

The First Part of Romans 8

Jacomb, Thomas – Sermons on the 8th Chapter of the Epistle to the Romans, verses 1-4  d. 1687  This has been reprinted by Banner of Truth

Jacomb (1622–1687) was an English puritan.

Binning, Hugh – The Sinner’s Sanctuary, Forty sermons on Rom. 8:1-15  d. 1653

Binning (1627-1653) was a Scottish covenanter.

***  “The writer of Binning’s Memoir says: ‘There is a pure stream of piety and learning running through the whole, and a very peculiar turn of thought, which exceeds the common rate of writers on this choice part of the Holy Scriptures.'” – Spurgeon

Lightfoot, John – Hebrew and Talmudical Exercitations upon Some Few Chapters of the Epistle to the Romans  on Rom. 8:1-4

Lightfoot was a mid-1600’s reformed divine who was invited to the Westminster Assembly.  He mined the Jewish writings for anything and everything that may be of help in understanding the New Testament.  Here are his results.  This is the only work of its kind in English.

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On the Whole of Romans 8

1500’s

Hedlambe, John – An Exposition of the Whole Eighth Chapter to the Romans, Wherein is perfectly proved our Justification to be by faith only, to the beating down and overthrowing of all erroneous and false opinions to the contrary  1579  48 pp.

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1600’s

Cowper, William, of Galloway – Three Heavenly Treatises upon Romans 8, wherein the counsel of God concerning man’s salvation is so manifested that all men may see the Ancient of Days, the Judge of the World, in his general justice court absolving the Christian from sin and death, which is the first benefit we have by our Lord Jesus Christ  1609  457 pp.

Cowper (1568–1619) was a reformed Scottish bishop.

Parr, Elnathan – A Plain Exposition upon the Whole 8, 9, 10, 11 chapters of the Epistle of Saint Paul to the Romans. Wherein the text is diligently and methodically resolved, the sense given: and many doctrines thence gathered, are by lively uses applied, for the benefit of God’s children performed with much variety, and convenient brevity: being the substance of near four years weekdays’ Sermons  1618

Parr (1577-1622) was reformed.

***  “The style is faulty, but the matter is rich and full of suggestions.  We regret that the work is not complete, and is seldom to be met with except in fragments.” – Spurgeon

Elton, Edward – The Triumph of a True Christian Described: or An Explication of the Eighth Chapter of the Epistle of Saint Paul to the Romans, wherein the Sanctified Sinner’s Heaven upon Earth is Laid Open, with Explication of the Comfort of it to as many as are so Qualified. Delivered in Sundry Sermons  1623

Elton (1569-1624) was a reformed, English puritan.

Horton, Thomas – Forty Six Sermons upon the Whole Eighth Chapter of the Epistle of the apostle Paul to the Romans, lately preached  Buy  1674

Horton (d. 1673) was an English, reformed puritan.

***  “Full of matter, well, but rather too formally, arranged.  The sermons are very prim and orderly.” – Spurgeon

Manton, Thomas – 47 Sermons on Romans 8  383 pp.  d. 1677

Hamilton, Alexander – A Cordial for Christians Traveling Heavenward, being the Substance of some Sermons upon the Eighth chapter of Paul’s Epistle to the Romans  1696  232 pp.

Hamilton (d. 1696) was a Scot who preached these sermons in Edinburgh.

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Romans 9-16

Parr, Elnathan

A Plain Exposition upon the Whole 8, 9, 10, 11 chapters of the Epistle of Saint Paul to the Romans. Wherein the text is diligently and methodically resolved, the sense given: and many doctrines thence gathered, are by lively uses applied, for the benefit of God’s children performed with much variety, and convenient brevity: being the substance of near four years weekdays’ Sermons

A Plain Exposition upon the Whole Thirteenth, Fourteenth, Fifteenth, and Sixteenth Chapters of the Epistle of St. Paul to the Romans, wherein the text is diligently and methodically resolved, the sense given, and many doctrines thence gathered, are by lively uses applied for the benefit of God’s children. Performed with much variety, and convenient brevity  1622

Parr (1577-1622) was reformed.

***  “The style is faulty, but the matter is rich and full of suggestions.  We regret that the work is not complete, and is seldom to be met with except in fragments.” – Spurgeon

Elton, Edward – The Great Mystery of Godliness Opened being an Exposition upon the Whole Ninth Chapter of the Epistle of Saint Paul to the Romans  †1624

Elton (1569-1624) was reformed.

Goodwin, John – An Exposition of the Ninth chapter of the Epistle to the Romans: wherein by the tenor and carriage of the contents of the said chapter, from first to last, is plainly showed and proved that the Apostle’s scope therein is to assert and maintain his great doctrine of justification by faith and that here he discourses nothing at all concerning any personal election or reprobation of men, from Eternity  (London, 1653)

Goodwin (1594?-1665) was a notable Arminian, whom John Owen and others argued against.  Goodwin is nonetheless still often considered a puritan due to his emphasis on practical, godly living.

Draxe, Thomas –  The World’s Resurrection, or the General Calling of the Jews; A Familiar Commentary upon the Eleventh Chapter of St. Paul to the Romans, according to the sense of Scripture and the consent of the most judicious interpreters, wherein above fifty notable questions are soundly answered, and the particular doctrines, reasons and uses of every verse, are profitable and plainly delivered  1608

Draxe (d. 1608) was a reformed puritan.

Lightfoot, John – Hebrew and Talmudical Exercitations upon Some Few Chapters of the Epistle to the Romans  on chs. 3, 8, 11

Lightfoot was a mid-1600’s reformed divine who was invited to the Westminster Assembly.  He mined the Jewish writings for anything and everything that may be of help in understanding the New Testament.  Here are his results.  This is the only work of its kind in English.  

Leighton, Robert – An Expository Lecture on Rom. 12:3-12  1600’s

Hooper, John – Godly and Most Necessary Annotations on the 13th chapter to the Romans  1551


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1 Corinthians

Colet, John – An Exposition on 1 Corinthians  d. 1519  rep. 1874  

Colet was a reforming, English, humanist, Roman Catholic Priest who as critical of the Church and was a friend of Erasmus.

**  “A curiosity and nothing more.  This same ancient Dean Colet, the friend of Erasmus, wrote also on the Romans.” – Spurgeon

Lightfoot, John – Hebrew and Talmudical Exercitations upon 1 Corinthians, to which is added a discourse concerning what Bibles were used to be read in the religious assemblies of the Jews  See also the table of contents to the Addenda to 1 Cor. 14

Lightfoot was a mid-1600’s reformed divine who was invited to the Westminster Assembly.  He mined the Jewish writings for anything and everything that may be of help in understanding the New Testament.  Here are his results.  This is the only work of its kind in English.  

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Chapters in 1 Corinthians

1500’s

Erasmus, Desiderus – An Exhortation to the Diligent study of scripture: An Exposition of 1 Corinthians 7  1529

Luther, Martin – Works, vol. 28: 1 Corinthians 7, 1 Corinthians 15, Lectures on 1 Timothy  Buy

1600’s

Fuller, Thomas – Joseph’s Party-Colored Coat: a Commentary on 1 Corinthians 11  1640

Fuller was a reformed Anglican.

Burgess, Cornelius – The Scripture Directory for Church Officers and People, or, a Practical Commentary upon 1 Cor. 3  1659

Burgess (d. 1664) was one of the Westminster divines.

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2 Corinthians

None

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Chapters in 2 Corinthians

1500’s

Bird, Samuel – Lectures upon the 8th & 9th Chapters of 2 Corinthians  1598

Bird’s (d. 1604) theological persuasion is unknown.

Rollock, Robert – 5 Sermons on 2 Cor. 5:1-18  d. 1599

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1600’s

Sibbes, Richard

A Learned Commentary or Exposition upon 2 Corinthians 1  d. 1635

Exposition of 2 Cor. 4  d. 1635  180 pp.  in Works, 4:307-488

Manton, Thomas – 40 Sermons on 2 Cor. 5  d. 1677

Burgess, Cornelius – An Expository Commentary, Doctrinal, Controversial and Practical upon 2 Corinthians 1  d. 1677  being 147 sermons

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Galatians

1500’s

Luther, Martin – Commentary on Galatians  Reformer

One exception that may be taken to this work is Luther’s teaching that Christ Himself became sin (that is: sinful) on the cross in order to make the Atonement.  On the contrary the sacrifice must be pure, righteous and without sin in order to be effectual.  There is a legal imputation of sin, but not an infusing thereof.  See John Murray on “The Imputation of Adam’s Sin” for a corrective to Luther on this point.

***  “‘I prefer this book of Martin Luther’s (except the Bible) before all the books that I have ever seen, as most fit for a wounded conscience.’ – Bunyan.  This is a great historic work, and is beyond criticism, on account of its great usefulness.  As a comment its accuracy might be questioned; but for emphatic utterances and clear statements of the great doctrine of the Epistle it remains altogether by itself, and must be judged per se.” – Spurgeon

Prime, John – An Exposition & Observations upon St. Paul to the Galatians, Together with Incident Questions Debated & Motives Removed  1587

Prime (1550-1596) was reformed.

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1600’s

Perkins, William – A Commentary or Exposition upon Galatians 1-5  d. 1602

**  “Perkins was justly esteemed by his contemporaries as a master in theology.  This commentary is deeply theological, and reads like a body of divinity: truth compels us to confess that we find it dull.” – Spurgeon

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Chapters in Galatians

Torshell, Samuel – The Three Questions of Free Justification, Christian Liberty, The Use of the Law, Explicated in a Brief Comment on St. Paul to the Galatians, from 2:16 – 3:26  1632

Torshell (1604-1650) was English and reformed.

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Ephesians

1500’s

Ridley, Lancelot – A Commentary in English upon Saint Paul’s Epistle to the Ephesians for the instruction of them that be unlearned in tongues, gathered out of the holy Scriptures and of the old catholic doctors of the Church, and of the best authors that now a days do write  1540

Ridley was reformed.

**  “John Bale wrote in 1543: ‘The Commentary which that virtuous learned man, Master Lancelot Ridley, made upon St. Paul’s Epistle to the Ephesians, for the true erudition of his Christian brethren, hath my Lord Bonner here also condemned for heresy.  But what the cause is I cannot tell, unless it be for advancing the Gospel as the thing whereby we are made righteous.’  Our author is equally fierce against Anabaptists and Papists, but is not much of a commentator.” – Spurgeon

Hemmingsen, Niels – Ephesians Faithfully Expounded, both for the Benefit of the learned and unlearned.  Herein are handled the high mysteries of our Salvation, as may appear by the Table of Commonplaces…  1580

Hemmingsen (1513-1600) was a Lutheran.

**  “A Danish divine of high repute in his own day.  Some of his works were turned into English; but the translations, like the originals, are now left in undeserved oblivion.” – Spurgeon

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1600’s

Bayne, Paul – An Entire Commentary upon Ephesians  d. 1617

**  “Sibbes says of this work: ‘The greatest shall find matter to exercise themselves in; the meaner, matter of sweet comfort and holy instruction; and all confess that he hath brought some light to this Scripture.'” – Spurgeon

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Chapters in Ephesians

Goodwin, Thomas  †1680

An Exposition of Ephesians 1

An Exposition of 2:1-1114-16

An Exposition of Ephesians 3:16-21

Rollock, Robert – An Exposition of part of the Fifth and Sixth Chapters of St. Paul’s Epistle to the Ephesians   d. 1598  ‘In a volume containing sundry fragments of expositions.’ – Spurgeon  Here is the work in Latin.

**  “This renowned Scotchman’s writings generally come to us as translations from the Latin, and have been made preternaturally dull in the process of interpretation; but this appears to have been written in English by himself.  It is practical to a high degree, and goes into minute details of the married life, etc.  it will not be much appreciated in these days, though Dr. McCrie styles Rollock’s works ‘succinct and judicious.'” – Spurgeon

Goodwin, Thomas – An Exposition of Ephesians 5:30-32  d. 1680

Manton, Thomas – Sermons upon Eph. 5:1-27  325 pp.  in Works, vol. 19, p. 169 ff.

Gurnall, William – The Christian in Complete Armour; A Treatise of the Saints’ War against the Devil  on Eph. 6:10-20

“This exhaustive exposition by a Puritan writer ably treats the spiritual warfare of the saints and the equipment given them by God to assure the victory.” – Cyril J. Barber

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Latin Commentary on Ephesians

Boyd, Robert – Commentary on the Epistle of the Apostle Paul to the Ephesians  (London, 1652)  The end of the volume has indices of words and phrases, and of chief common places and theological questions.

Boyd (1578-1627) was a Scottish covenanter.  

“His posthumously published Latin commentary on Ephesians… is an enduring monument to his learning.  The work, however, is far more than a commentary and includes discussions of virtually every important locus of a systematic theology… his intention in this was to derive the chief heads of Christian doctrine from Scripture, Ephesians being deliberately chosen for the purpose…” – James Kirk (Dict. of Scot. CH&T)


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Philippians

Ridley, Lancelot – An Exposition in English upon the Epistle of St. Paul to the Philippians  1550

Ridley (1576) was a reformed Anglican.

Airay, Henry – Lectures upon the whole of Philippians  1618  EEBO

**  “Mr. Grosart says: ‘You will look in vain in this commentary for erudite criticism or subtle exegesis in the modern sense: but there seems to us to be an instructively true following up of the Apostolic thoughts, and a quick insight into their bearings and relative force.” – Spurgeon

Daille, John – An Exposition of Philippians  Buy  d. 1670

Daille was of the reformed tradition, though a hypothetical universalist.

**  “Written in a deliciously florid style.  Very sweet and evangelical: after the French manner.” – Spurgeon

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Philippians 3

Sibbes, Richard – An Exposition of Philippians 3  1639, This is not in Sibbes’ 7 volume set of Works

Manton, Thomas – Sermons upon Philippians 3:7-21  †1677  175 pp.  in Works, vol. 20

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Colossians

1500’s

Ridley, Lancelot – An Exposition in English upon the Epistle of St. Paul to the Colossians, wherein the letter is purely declared, with many good exhortations to flee vice and to take virtue  1548

Ridley (d. 1576) was a reformed Anglican.

Rollock, Robert – Lectures on Colossians  EEBO  †1599  41 Lectures

** – ‘It is said that when this great divine died the entire population of Edinburgh attended his funeral.  His Lectures on Colossians were once very popular, but are now extremely scarce.  The style is very simple and colloquial, and the matter far from profound.’ – Spurgeon

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1600’s

Cartwright, Thomas – An Exposition of Colossians in Sundry Sermons  d. 1603  EEBO

Cartwright (1534-1603) was an influential and leading English presbyterian.

**  “This is but a small affair, consisting of scanty and second rate ‘notes’ by a hearer.  Yet what there is of it has the true ring, and is rich in spirituality.” – Spurgeon

Elton, Edward – An Exposition of the Epistle of St Paul to the Colossians delivered in sundry sermons 1615  EEBO

Elton (d. 1624) was a reformed minister near London.

***  “A Puritan work; strongly Calvinistic, popular, and very full.” – Spurgeon

Byfield, Nicholas – An Exposition upon the Epistle to the Colossians  1615

***  “The author lived in intense pain, and died at 44, yet he produced quite a mountain of literature.  He writes like an earnest, faithful man, resolved to keep back nothing of the counsel of God; but he too little studies brevity, and consequently he wearies most readers.  He is always worth consulting.” – Spurgeon

Davenant, John – An Exposition of Colossians, vols. 1, 2  †1641

Davenant was of the reformed tradition, though a hypothetical universalist.

***  “I know no exposition upon a detached portion of Scripture (with the single exception of Owen on the Hebrews) that will compare with it in all points.  Leighton is superior in sweetness, but far inferior in depth, accuracy, and discursiveness.” – Charles Bridges, as quoted by Spurgeon

Daille, John – 49 Sermons upon the Whole Epistle of the Apostle St. Paul to the Colossians  Buy  d. 1670

Daillie (1594-1670) was of the reformed tradition, though a hypothetical-universalitst.

On his work on the Philippians:  **  “Written in a deliciously florid style.  Very sweet and evangelical: after the French manner.” – Spurgeon

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Chapters in Colossians

Bayne, Paul – Commentary on Colossians 1 & 2  1634

***  “…Edifying and very rare.” – Spurgeon

Lockyer, Nicholas – England faithfully watched with in her wounds: or, Christ as a Father Sitting up with his Children in their Swooning State, which is the sum of several lectures painfully preached upon Colossians 1  1646  Here are his sermons on Col. 1:11-12

***  “Rich, full, simple.  A fair specimen of plain Puritan preaching.” – Spurgeon

Manton, Thomas – Christ’s Eternal Existence and the Dignity of his Person Asserted and Proved, in Opposition to the Doctrine of the Socinians  8 sermons on Col. 1:14-20  89 pp.  in Works, vol. 1, p. 415 ff.


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1 Thessalonians

Jewel, John – An Exposition upon the Two Epistles of the apostle St. Paul to the Thessalonians  1571

**  “Hooker calls Jewel ‘the jewel of bishops’.  This work is in the usual style of the first Reformers, but rather more lively than most of them.  Many of the topics touched upon were peculiar to the times in which the exposition was written.  It will serve as a good specimen of the preaching of the Fathers of the English Church.” – Spurgeon

Rollock, Robert – Lectures upon 1 & 2 Thessalonians  d. 1599

**  “This renowned Scotchman’s writings generally come to us as translations from the Latin, and have been made preternaturally dull in the process of interpretation; but this appears to have been written in English by himself.  It is practical to a high degree, and goes into minute details of the married life, etc.  it will not be much appreciated in these days, though Dr. McCrie styles Rollock’s works ‘succinct and judicious.'” – Spurgeon

Sclater, William – An Exposition with Notes upon the First & Second Epistle to the Thessalonians  1619

Sclater (1575-1626) was a reformed puritan.

**  “Sclater is antique; but, in the usual Puritanic manner, he gives very instructive disquisitions upon a vast variety of topics suggested by the text.” – Spurgeon

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1 Thessalonians 4

Case, Thomas – Mount Pisgah, or, A Prospect of Heaven, being an Exposition of 1 Thess. 4:13 to the End of the Chapter, divided into Three Parts  Buy  1670

Case (d. 1682) was a reformed puritan and Westminster divine.

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2 Thessalonians

1500’s

Bullinger, Heinrich – A Commentary upon the Second Epistle of St. Paul to the Thessalonians, in the which, besides the sum of our faith, their is sincerely handled [and] set forth at large, not only first coming up [and] rising with the full property [and] dominion, but also the fall and utter confusion of the kingdom of Antichrist: that is to say of Mahomet [and] the Bishop of Rome (Southwark, 1538)

Jewel, John – An Exposition upon the Two Epistles of the Apostle St. Paul to the Thessalonians  1571

**  “Hooker calls Jewel ‘the jewel of bishops’.  This work is in the usual style of the first Reformers, but rather more lively than most of them.  Many of the topics touched upon were peculiar to the times in which the exposition was written.  It will serve as a good specimen of the preaching of the Fathers of the English Church.” – Spurgeon

Tymme, Thomas – The Figure of Antichrist, with the Tokens of the End of the World, most plainly deciphered by a Catholic and Divine Exposition of the Second Epistle of Paul to the Thessalonians, collected out of the Best and Most Approved Divines, both Old & New…  (London, 1586)

Tymme (d. 1620) was a reformed, Anglican, archbishop, translator and author.

Rollock, Robert – Lectures upon the First and Second Epistles of Paul to the Thessalonians  d. 1599

**  “This renowned Scotchman’s writings generally come to us as translations from the Latin, and have been made preternaturally dull in the process of interpretation; but this appears to have been written in English by himself.  It is practical to a high degree, and goes into minute details of the married life, etc.  it will not be much appreciated in these days, though Dr. McCrie styles Rollock’s works ‘succinct and judicious.'” – Spurgeon

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1600’s

Bradshaw, William – A Plain and Pithy Exposition of the 2 Thessalonians  d. 1618

**  “As we cannot get a sight of this, perhaps some reader will present us with a copy.” – Spurgeon

Sclater, William – An Exposition with Notes upon the Second Epistle to the Thessalonians  1619

Sclater (1575-1626) was a reformed puritan.

**  “Sclater is antique; but, in the usual Puritanic manner, he gives very instructive disquisitions upon a vast variety of topics suggested by the text.” – Spurgeon

Jackson, Timothy – A Brief & Plain, yet Orthodoxal & Methodical Exposition upon St. Paul’s Second Epistle written to the Thessalonians  (London, 1621)

Jackson (d. 1636) was an English minister and Cambridge scholar.

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2 Thessalonians 1

Manton, Thomas – Sermons upon 2 Thess. 1:4-12  16 sermons, 152 pp. in Works, vol. 20

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2 Thess. 2: the Antichrist

1500’s

Calvin, John – Commentary on 2 Thess. 2:3-10  †1564  14 pages

Carlile, Christopher – An Interpretation of 2 Thess. 2 which describes the Antichrist, I mean the Pope  1572

Carlile (ca. 1530-1588) was an Anglican, a student of Immanuel Tremellius and was a Hebrew scholar.

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1600’s

Du Moulin, Pierre – The Prophecy in 2 Thess. 2:3-11  1613

Squire, John – A Plain Exposition on 2 Thessalonians 2:1-13, Proving the Pope to be Antichrist, being [28] Lectures  1630

**  “Squire works out the point of the Pope’s being Antichrist with very great cogency of reasoning.  The exposition of the Epistle is lost in the point aimed at: but that point is of the utmost importance.” – Spurgeon

Hall, Edmund – The Apostasy, the Antichrist, or a Scriptural discourse of the Apostasy and the Antichrist, by way of comment upon the Twelve First Verses of 2 Thess. 2 under which are opened many of the dark prophecies of the Old Testament, which relate to the calling of the Jews, and the glorious things to be affected at the seventh trumpet through the world, together with a discourse of slaying the witnesses, and the immediate effects thereof    1653

Hall (1619-1687) was a reformed Anglican.

Guild, William – On 2 Thess. 2:3-9, Antichrist… the Popes of Rome proven to be that Man of Sin…  1655  see chs. 3, 7, 9-11 & 16-18

Guild was a Scottish covenanter.

Manton, Thomas – 18 Sermons on 2 Thess. 2  d. 1677  180 pages

***  “Here Manton smites heavily at Popery.  Richard Baxter wrote a commendatory preface to this valuable exposition.” – Spurgeon

Wilkinson, Henry – The Pope of Rome is Antichrist  on 2 Thess. 2:3-10  in Puritan Sermons, 6:1-25  †1690

Wilkinson was reformed.


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1 Timothy

1500’s

Luther, Martin – Works, vol. 28: 1 Corinthians 7, 1 Corinthians 15, Lectures on 1 Timothy  Buy

Calvin, John – Sermons on the Epistles of St. Paul to Timothy and Titus  Buy

***  “Quite a different work from Calvin’s Commentaries.” – Spurgeon

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1 Timothy 4

Du Moulin, Pierre – The Prophecy in 1 Tim. 4:1-4  1613

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2 Timothy

Calvin, John – Sermons on the Epistles of St. Paul to Timothy and Titus  Buy

***  “Quite a different work from Calvin’s Commentaries.” – Spurgeon

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Chapters in 2 Timothy

Barlow, John – An Exposition of 2 Timothy 1  1625

Barlow (b. 1580-1-1629/30) was an English protestant minister educated at Oxford.  He also wrote an exposition on 2 Tim. 2.

***  “By a master in Israel.  Thoroughly practical, deeply experimental, and soundly doctrinal.” – Spurgeon

Hall, Thomas – A Practical and Polemical Commentary on 2 Tim. 3-4  GB  1658

Hall (1632-58)

***  “Hall is often found in union with Barlow, completing the Commentary on 2 Timothy, as he completed Amos.  He is a masterly expositor, of the old-fashioned school.” – Spurgeon

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Titus

1500’s

Luther, Martin – Works, vol. 29: Lectures on Titus, Philemon, and Hebrews  Buy

Calvin, John – Sermons on the Epistles of St. Paul to Timothy and Titus  Buy

***  “Quite a different work from Calvin’s Commentaries.” – Spurgeon

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1600’s

Taylor, Thomas – A Commentary upon the Epistle of St. Paul written to Titus. Preached in Cambridge  1612

Taylor (1576-1632) was a reformed puritan.

***  “The title-page calls Thomas Taylor ‘a famous and most elaborate divine.’  He was a preacher at Paul’s Cross during the reigns of Elizabeth and James I, and a voluminous writer.  This Commentary will well repay the reader.”


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Philemon

1500’s

Luther, Martin – Works, vol. 29: Lectures on Titus, Philemon, and Hebrews  Buy

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1600’s

Attersoll, William – A Commentary upon the Epistle to Philemon  1612

***  “A long comment upon a short epistle.  The pious author labors to keep to his text, and succeeds in bringing out of it a mass of quaint practical teaching.” – Spurgeon

Dyke, Daniel – Two Treatises: The One a Most Fruitful Exposition upon Philemon; the other, the School of Affliction  1614

Dyke was a reformed puritan.

**  “Dyke’s remarks are memorably practical and full of common sense.  He abounds in proverbs.  The work is not very valuable as an exposition of the words, but excels in making use of them.” – Spurgeon

Jones, William – A Commentary upon the Epistles of St. Paul to Philemon and to the Hebrews, together with a compendious explication of the Second and Third Epistles of St. John  1635

Jones was reformed. 

***  “Very lively, sprightly, colloquial lectures, by a Suffolk divine, who thinks the Brownists and Dissenters were not persecuted.  “Christ was whipped, that was persecution; Christ whipped some out of the temple, that was no persecution.”  Despite his intolerance he says some uncommonly racy things.” – Spurgeon

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Hebrews

1500’s

Luther, Martin – Works, vol. 29: Lectures on Titus, Philemon, and Hebrews  Buy

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1600’s

Dickson, David – A Short Explanation of the Epistle of Paul to the Hebrews   Buy  1635  

Dickson was a prominent Scottish covenanter.  This work on Hebrews is different than his work on all the epistles.

*** – ‘We need say no more than–get it, and you will find abundance of suggestions for profitable trains of thought.’

Jones, William – A Commentary upon the Epistles of St. Paul to Philemon and to the Hebrews, together with a compendious explication of the Second and Third Epistles of St. John  1635

Jones (1561-1636) was reformed. 

**  “Very lively, sprightly, colloquial lectures, by a Suffolk divine, who thinks the Brownists and Dissenters were not persecuted.  “Christ was whipped, that was persecution; Christ whipped some out of the temple, that was no persecution.”  Despite his intolerance he says some uncommonly racy things.” – Spurgeon

Gouge, William – Commentary on Hebrews, vols. 1 (1-5), 2 (6-10), 3 (11-End)  Buy  1655

***  “We greatly prize Gouge.  Many will think his system of observations cumbrous, and so, perhaps, it is; but upon any topic which he touches he gives outlines which may supply sermons for months.”

Lawson, George – An Exposition of the Epistle to the Hebrews wherein the Text is cleared, Theopolitica [the city of God] improved, the Socinian comment Examined  1662

Lawson (c.1598-1678) was reformed.

**  “Richard Baxter says: ‘I must thankfully acknowledge that I learned more from Mr. Lawson than from any divine that ever I conversed with.”

Owen, John – Exposition of Hebrews, vols. 1 (Prefatory), 2 (chs. 1-4), 3 (5-8), 4 (9-13)  †1683  The volumes average about 800 pp.

***  “Out of scores of commendations of this colossal work we select but one.  Dr. [Thomas] Chalmers pronounced it ‘a work of gigantic strength as well as gigantic size; and he who hath mastered it is very little short, both in respect to the doctrinal and practical Christianity, of being an erudite and accomplished theologian.'” – Spurgeon

“…with the excercitations, it may be reckoned one of the most valuable systems of doctrinal, practical and experimental divinity, that is to be met with in the English language.” – Edward Williams

Abridgments of Owen (shortest to longest):

Epistle to the Hebrews  Preview  Buy  abridged in one volume by M.J. Tyron, Preface by H. Lockyer, Kregel Publications, 283 pp.

This inexpensive paperback book is NECESSARY.  The abridgment covers each verse in about half a page to 2 pages, whereas the original often spends 30-60 pages on each verse.  Introductory material to the whole book is not included in this abridgment.  The abridgment is great if you simply want to quickly open the volume and find out how Owen interpreted a given verse with some relevant comments.  Doing the same in the original may take you all day.  Read the abridgment straight through in several sittings and you will have a great view of Owen on the whole book.  See the Preview link.

Exposition of Hebrews: Revised and Abridged, vol. 1 (Intro), 2 (1-4), 3 (5-9), 4 (10-13) by Dr. Edward Williams  The volumes average about 450 pp., about half the number of the original.  The editor’s preface explains his, quite good, philosophy of abridgment.

Williams (1750–1813) was a Welsh nonconformist minister.

Williams: “The reader… may depend upon on it, that all the valuable, useful, and pertinent criticisms; the most forcible arguments in proof of any important point; the most evangelical and sublime sentiments and doctrines; the most close, convincing, and edifying improvements; the most animating and pathetic addresses and exhortations, contained in the other [original work], are preserved in this.”

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Chapters in Hebrews

Dering, Edward – 27 Lectures, or Readings, upon part of the Epistle written to the Hebrews  [Heb. 1-6:6]  1577

Dering was reformed and a puritan.

***  “Mainly aimed at the errors of the Church of Rome, and at the practical questions of the Reformation period.  A learned but antiquated set of lectures.” – Spurgeon

Roberts, Huw – The Day of Hearing: or, Six Lectures upon the Latter Part of the Third Chapter of the Epistle to the Hebrews of the Time & Means that God has Appointed for man to come to the knowledge of his truth that they may be saved from his wrath  1600

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Hebrews 11-12

Manton, Thomas – 66 Sermons on Hebrews 11:1-4, 11:4-28, 11:29-31  704 pp.  in Works, vol. 13-15

***  “Exhaustive.  Manton piles up his matter heaps upon heaps.”

Perkins, William – A Cloud of Faithful Witnesses, leading to the heavenly Canaan, or, a Commentary upon Hebrews 11  d. 1602

**  “Good in its day, but now superseded.  Very many points are discussed which would now be regarded as ridiculous: as for instance, whether a man may travel in a foreign country.  It is terribly prosy.”

Shaw, John – The Catalogue of the Hebrew Saints Canonized by St. Paul [in] Heb. 11, further Explained & Applied  1659

Shaw (1614-1689) was a conforming puritan.

Burroughs, Jeremiah

Moses, his Self-Denial , Delivered in a Treatise upon Heb. 11:24  EEBO  Buy  1641

Moses his Choice, with his Eye Fixed upon Heaven: Discovering the Happy Condition of a Self-Denying Heart, a Treatise upon Hebrews 11:25-26  Buy  1650

The Excellency of Holy Courage in Evil Times  Buy  1661  on Heb. 11:27

Andrews, G. – Sermons upon the Twelfth Chapter of the Epistle of Paul the Apostle to the Hebrews 12  1711  published posthumously, Andrews was a minister in Edinburgh, Scotland

**  “Thoroughly Scotch.  Sound, but somewhat polix and commonplace.” – Spurgeon

Sylvester, Matthew – The Christian’s Race and Patience, Sermons on Hebrews 12, vol. 1, 2  Buy  1702-8

Sylvester (1636-1708)

**  “Not of the first class; yet respectable sermons.” – Spurgeon


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On the General Epistles

Luther, Martin – Works, vol. 30: The Catholic Epistles  Buy


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James

1500’s

Hemmingsen, Niels – A Learned and Fruitful Commentary upon James  1577

*  “The price which this book fetches is preposterous.  It is hard antique reading.” – Spurgeon

Turnbull, Richard – An Exposition upon the Canonical Epistle of St. James, Divided into 28 Lectures or Sermons  1592

Turnbull (d. 1593) was reformed. 

**  “Old and occupied with Popish controversies.  Good, solid, and tedious.” – Spurgeon

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1600’s

Mayer, John – Praxis Theologica: or the Epistle of James Resolved, Expounded and Preached upon  1629

On his whole Bible commentary:  **  ‘A rare and valuable author… The six volumes, folio, are a most judicious and able digest of former commentators, enriched with the author’s own notes, forming altogether one of the fullest and best of learned English commentaries; not meant for popular use, but invaluable to the student.  He is a link between the modern school, at the head of which I put Poole and Henry, and the older school who mostly wrote in Latin, and were tinctured with the conceits of those schoolmen who gathered like flies around the corpse of Aristotle.  He appears to have written before Diodati and Trapp, but lacked opportunity to publish.  I fear he will be forgotten, as there is but little prospect of the republication of so diffuse, and perhaps heavy, an author.  He is a very Alp of learning, but cold and lacking in spirituality, hence his lack of popularity.’ – Spurgeon

Manton, Thomas – A Practical Commentary, or, an Exposition with Notes on the Epistle of James; delivered in Sunday Weekly Lectures  d. 1677  460 pp.

***  “In Manton’s best style.  An exhaustive work, as far as the information of the period admitted.  Few such books are written now.” – Spurgeon

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James 1

Est, William – The Right Rule of a Religious Life: or, The Glass of Godliness, wherein every man may behold his imperfections, how far he is out of the way of true Godliness, and learn to reduce his wandering steps into the paths of true piety.  In certain lectures upon the First Chapter of the Epistle of St. James.  The First Part.  (London, 1616)

Est (1546 or 7-1625) was an English, protestant minister.

Goodwin, Thomas – A Exposition of James 1:1-5, Patience and her Perfect Work  d. 1680

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James 2

Gifford, George – A Godlie, Zealous, and Profitable Sermon upon the Second Chapter of Saint James. Preached at London…  (London, 1582)

** “We have several times met with this writer’s name coupled with that of Brightman as in his day regarded as a very learned writer, but we cannot procure his work [on the Song of Solomon].  Possibly some reader of this catalogue may yet present us with it.  We beg to assure him of the gratitude which we already feel, in the form of ‘a lively sense of favors to come’.” – Spurgeon

Morgan, John – A Short Analysis of a Part of the Second Chapter of St. James, from the 14th Verse to the end of the Same.  With a Brief Confutation of the Rhemists’ Annotations thereupon written  (London, 1588)


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1 Peter

1500’s

Luther, Martin – A Commentary or Exposition upon 1 Peter  d. 1546

***  “In Luther’s racy style.  One of his best productions.  Copies are scarce as white elephants, and consequently expensive.” – Spurgeon

Alley, William – The Poor Man’s Library Rapsodiæ: G.A. Bishop of Exceter upon the First Epistle of Saint Peter, read publicly in the cathedral church of saint Paul, within the city of London  1560

**  “A curious old Black Letter Folio.  The exposition on Peter is mainly occupied with the questions and controversies of the Reforming period.  Do not buy it.” – Spurgeon

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1600’s

Rogers, John – A Godly and Fruitful Exposition upon all the First Epistle of Peter  d. 1636

***  “Rogers was a true Boanerges [son of thunder].  His style is earnestly practical and wisely experimental.  This is one of the scarcest and liveliest of the Puritan expositions.” – Spurgeon

Ames, William – An Analytical Exposition of both the Epistles of the Apostle Peter  1641

**  “Too much divided and subdivided, chopped up and cut into dice pieces and laid in order; for after all, there is very little meat in it.  It is an analysis, and little more.” – Spurgeon

Nisbet, Alexander – A Brief Exposition of the First and Second Epistles General of Peter  Buy  1658

*** – ‘A judicious and gracious Scotch commentary, after the style of Dickson and Hutcheson.’ – Spurgeon

Leighton, Robert – A Practical Commentary on 1 Peter, vols. 12   Buy  d. 1684

Leighton (1611-84) was an evangelical Scottish bishop.  His commentary is very good and is full of heart religion.

*** – “Dr. Henry Mills thus wrote of Leighton’s works: ‘There is a spirit in them I never met with in any other human writings, nor can I read many lines in them without being moved.’  We need scarcely commend this truly heavenly work.  It is a favorite with all spiritual men.” – Spurgeon

“One of the best expository works on I Peter. Leighton provides his reader with the results of his vast learning without ostentation; his theology is accurate and his eloquence unmatched. Devotional. Anglican.” – Cyril J. Barber

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Chapters in 1 Peter

Byfield, Nicholas – A Commentary upon 1 Pet. 1-3:11  d. 1622 

**  “Byfield is an able and pious divine, but he is not very vivacious, and neither in manner nor matter is he at all original.” – Spurgeon

Pigg, Oliver – A Comfortable Treatise upon 1 Pet. 4:12-19  1582  87 pp.

Pigg (b. 1551) was an English puritan.

Luther, Martin – A Word in Season: being the Commentary of Dr. Martin Luther on three selected Psalms: viz. the 124th, 125th & 129th, with his commentary on some part of the Fourth & Fifth chapters of the First Epistle of St. Peter. Being of special use for the present times.  (London, 1685)

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2 Peter

1500’s

Luther, Martin – A Commentary or Exposition upon 2 Peter  d. 1546

***  “In Luther’s racy style.  One of his best productions.  Copies are scarce as white elephants, and consequently expensive.” – Spurgeon

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1600’s

Symson, Archibald – Exposition upon the Second Epistle General of St. Peter  1632

Simson (1564-1628) was a pastor in Dalkeith, Scotland.

**  “Abundance of matter, pithily expressed.  Symson is among the oldest and rarest of the English divines.” – Spurgeon

Ames, William – An Analytical Exposition of both the Epistles of the Apostle Peter  1641

Ames was a New England puritan.

**  “Too much divided and subdivided, chopped up and cut into dice pieces and laid in order; for after all, there is very little meat in it.  It is an analysis, and little more.” – Spurgeon

Adams, Thomas – An Exposition upon 2 Peter  d. 1652  EEBO

Adams was a puritan.

***  “Full of quaintnesses, holy wit, bright thought, and deep instruction.  We like Adams better in commenting than in preaching.  His great work is quite by itself, and in its own way remains unrivalled.  We know no richer and racier reading.” – Spurgeon

Nisbet, Alexander – A Brief Exposition of the First & Second Epistles General of Peter  Buy  1658

*** – ‘A judicious and gracious Scotch commentary, after the style of Dickson and Hutcheson.’

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Chapters in 2 Peter

Denison, Stephen – An Exposition upon 2 Peter 1, with the Principal Doctrines Naturally Arising from every Verse of the Same Chapter  1622  EEBO

Denison (d. 1649) was a reformed minister in London.

Mede, Joseph – A Paraphrase and Exposition of the Prophesy of St. Peter concerning the Day of Christ’s Second Coming, Described in the Third Chapter of His Second Epistle.  As Also, how the Conflagration, Or Destruction of the World by Fire… is to be Understood  d. 1638


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The Letters of John

Poole, Matthew – Critical Synopsis of the Bible: 1 John – Jude  Buy

This is different and much larger than Poole’s Annotations on Scripture.  Here Poole gives something of a history of interpretation (from Jewish writers until Christian interpreters of Poole’s own day) on every verse of the Bible.

‘…you will find in Poole’s Synopsis a marvelous collection of all the wisdom and folly of the critics.  It is a large cyclopedia worthy of the days when theologians could be cyclopean, and had not shrunk from folios to octavos.  Query—a query for which I will not demand an answer—has one of you beaten the dust from the venerable copy of Poole which loads our library shelves? 

Yet as Poole spent no less than ten years in compiling it, it should be worthy of your frequent notice—ten years, let me add, spent in Amsterdam in exile for the truth’s sake from his native land.  His work is based on an earlier compilation entitled Critici Sacri, containing the concentrated light of a constellation of learned men who have never been excelled in any age or country.’ – Spurgeon

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1 John

Cotton, John – A Practical Commentary, or an Exposition with Observations, Reasons, and Uses upon the First Epistle General of John  PoD  1652

***  “Calamy puts his imprimatur upon this book, and speaks of the author’s name as ‘deservedly precious among the saints of God.’  In doctrine and experience he is a noble teacher.”

“A Puritan work first published in 1657. So extensive that the reader can virtually develop a systematic theology from its contents.” – Cyril J. Barber

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Chapters in 1 John

Binning, Hugh – Fellowship with God, or, 28 Sermons on 1 John 1 & 2:1-3, wherein the true ground and foundation of attaining, the spiritual way of entertaining fellowship with the Father and the Son and the blessed condition of such as attain to it, are most succinctly and dilucidly explained  1653, in Works, p. 271 ff.

Binning was a Scottish covenanter.

***  “Milk for babes, and meat for men; calls to backsliders, and comforts for mourners.  ‘There is no speaking,’ says Durham, ‘after Mr. Binning; truly he had the tongue of the learned, and knew how to speak a word in season.” – Spurgeon

Hardy, Nathanael – The First General Epistle of St. John Unfolded and Applied  d. 1670  385 pp.  This is only on the first two chapters only, being 59 sermons.

Hardy (1618-70) was reformed and was a puritan.

***  “The Editor of Nichol’s Edition says, ‘This Exposition is only a fragment.  It was intended to consist of five parts, corresponding generally with the five chapters of the Epistle; but only two of them were accomplished.  In matter, the sermons are purely evangelical; in spirit, they are earnest and affectionate; in manner, they are eloquent and impressive.’  This is rather too ardent a commendation.” – Spurgeon

Manton, Thomas – Sermons upon 1 John 3:1-4, 3:5-24  32 Sermons in Works, vols. 20-21

Cotton, John – Christ the Fountain of Life: or, Sundry choice sermons on part of the 5th chapter of the First Epistle of St. John  1651

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2 John

Marlorate, Augustine – An Exposition of 2 John  d. 1560

Marlorate was reformed.

Marlorat (1506-1562) was reformed.  His commentaries are particularly valuable as they are compendiums of block quotes from some of the best reformed divines of his day on the passages of that particular Biblical book.  See here for an excerpt from his commentary on John. 

On his commentary on Matthew:  ** – “Marlorate was an eminent French reformer, preacher and martyr.  His commentaries contain the cream of the older writers, and are in much esteem, but are very rare.  He wrote on the whole New Testament, but we have in English only the Gospels [2-3 John] and Jude [and Revelation 1 & 13].” – Spurgeon

Jones, William – A Commentary upon the Epistles of St. Paul to Philemon and to the Hebrews, together with a compendious explication of the second and third Epistles of St. John  1635

Jones was reformed. 

***  “Very lively, sprightly, colloquial lectures, by a Suffolk divine, who thinks the Brownists and Dissenters were not persecuted.  “Christ was whipped, that was persecution; Christ whipped some out of the temple, that was no persecution.”  Despite his intolerance he says some uncommonly racy things.” – Spurgeon

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3 John

1500’s

Marlorate, Augustine – An Exposition of 3 John  d. 1560  14 pp.

Marlorat (1506-1562) was reformed.

On his commentary on Matthew: ** – “Marlorate was an eminent French reformer, preacher and martyr.  His commentaries contain the cream of the older writers, and are in much esteem, but are very rare.  He wrote on the whole New Testament, but we have in English only the Gospels [2-3 John] and Jude [and Revelation 1 & 13].” – Spurgeon

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1600’s

Jones, William – A Commentary upon the Epistles of St. Paul to Philemon and to the Hebrews, together with a compendious explication of the second and third Epistles of St. John  1635

Jones was reformed. 

***  “Very lively, sprightly, colloquial lectures, by a Suffolk divine, who thinks the Brownists and Dissenters were not persecuted.  “Christ was whipped, that was persecution; Christ whipped some out of the temple, that was no persecution.”  Despite his intolerance he says some uncommonly racy things.” – Spurgeon


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Jude

1500’s

Ridley, Lancelot – An Exposition in the Epistle of Jude the Apostle of Christ wherein he sets plainly before every man’s eyes false apostles, and their crafts, by the which they have long deceived simple Christian people.  1538

On his work on Ephesians:  **  “John Bale wrote in 1543: ‘The Commentary which that virtuous learned man, Master Lancelot Ridley, made upon St. Paul’s Epistle to the Ephesians, for the true erudition of his Christian brethren, hath my Lord Bonner here also condemned for heresy.  But what the cause is I cannot tell, unless it be for advancing the Gospel as the thing whereby we are made righteous.’  Our author is equally fierce against Anabaptists and Papists, but is not much of a commentator.” – Spurgeon

Luther, Martin – A Commentary or Exposition upon Jude  d. 1546 

***  “In Luther’s racy style.  One of his best productions.  Copies are scarce as white elephants, and consequently expensive.” – Spurgeon

Marlorat, Augustine – Commentary on Jude  †1562

Marlorat (1506-1562) was reformed.  His commentaries are particularly valuable as they are compendiums of block quotes from some of the best reformed divines of his day on the passages of that particular Biblical book.  See here for an excerpt from his commentary on John. 

**“Marlorate was an eminent French reformer, preacher and martyr.  His commentaries contain the cream of the older writers, and are in much esteem, but are very rare.  He wrote on the whole New Testament, but we have in English only the Gospels [2-3 John] and Jude [and Revelation 1 & 13].” – Spurgeon

Turnbull, Richard – An Exposition upon the Canonical Epistle of St. Jude, Divided into Ten Sermons or Lectures  1592

Turnbull (1593) was reformed.

*  “Old and occupied with Popish controversies.  Good solid, and tedious.” – Spurgeon

Trigge, Francis – A Touchstone, whereby may be Easily Discerned which is the True Catholic Faith, of all them that Profess the Name of Catholics in the Church of England, that they be not deceived, taken out of the Catholic Epistle of St. Jude  (London, 1599)

Trigge (c.1547-1606) was reformed.

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1600’s

Perkins, William – A Godly and Learned Exposition upon the Whole Epistle of Jude, containing 66 Sermons  d. 1602

**  “Perkins was regarded by his contemporaries as a paragon of learning, but his writings fail to interest the generality of readers.” – Spurgeon

Willet, Andrew – A Catholicon, that is, A General Preservative or Remedy Against the Pseudo-Catholic Religion gathered out of the catholic Epistle of St. Jude, briefly expounded and aptly, according to the time, applied to more than half a hundred of popish errors, and as many corruptions of manners  1602

***  “This book is in the [British] Museum, but we cannot procure a copy.” – Spurgeon

Otes, Samuel – An Explanation of the General Epistle of Saint Jude in 41 Sermons  1633  525 pp.

**  “Of the conforming Puritan style, full of quaintness and singularities of learning.  A book by no means to be despised.” – Spurgeon

Manton, Thomas – A Practical Commentary on Jude  ToC  1658

***  “Manton at first gave up all idea of printing this book on Jude, when he found that Jenkyn had taken up the subject; but he afterwards changed his mind.  He tells us: ‘I consulted with my reverend brother’s book, and when I found any point at large discussed by him, I either omitted it or mentioned it very briefly; so that his labors will be necessary to supply the weakness of mine.” – Spurgeon

Poole, Matthew – Critical Synopsis of the Bible: 1 John – Jude  Buy  †1679

This is different and much larger than Poole’s Annotations on Scripture.  Here Poole gives something of a history of interpretation (from Jewish writers until Christian interpreters of Poole’s own day) on every verse of the Bible.

‘…you will find in Poole’s Synopsis a marvelous collection of all the wisdom and folly of the critics.  It is a large cyclopedia worthy of the days when theologians could be cyclopean, and had not shrunk from folios to octavos.  Query—a query for which I will not demand an answer—has one of you beaten the dust from the venerable copy of Poole which loads our library shelves?  Yet as Poole spent no less than ten years in compiling it, it should be worthy of your frequent notice—ten years, let me add, spent in Amsterdam in exile for the truth’s sake from his native land.  His work is based on an earlier compilation entitled Critic Sacri, containing the concentrated light of a constellation of learned men who have never been excelled in any age or country.’ – Spurgeon

Jenkyn, William – An Exposition of Jude  †1685  850 pp.

***  “Earnest and popular, but very full, and profoundly learned.  A treasure-house of good things.” – Spurgeon

“This work preceded Manton’s monumental treatment. Manton regarded this exposition with such awe that he purposely avoided duplicating any of its material in his own work. Should be purchased if found.” – Cyril J. Barber


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On the Revelation

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Revelation 2-3: the Seven Letters

1500’s

Perkins, William – A Godly and Learned Exposition or Commentary upon the Three First Chapters of the Revelation. Preached in Cambridge  1595  220 pp.

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1600’s

More, Henry – An Exposition of the Seven Epistles to the Seven Churches together with a brief Discourse of Idolatry, with Application to the Church of Rome  1669  140 pp.

More (1614-1687) was an Arminian, Latitudinarian Anglican. 

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Revelation: Partial Preterist Commentaries

1500’s

Roman Catholic, in Latin

Henten, John – Enarrationes Vetustissimorum Theologorum, in Acta Quidem Apostolorum et in Omnes D. Pauli ac catholicas epistolas ab Oecumenio : in apocalypsim vero  1545

Henten (1499-1566) was a Roman Catholic.

Salmeron, Alfonso – Disputationum in Epistolas Canonicas, et Apocalypsim: tomus quartus ac omnium operum postremus  1602

Salmeron (1515-1585) was a Roman Catholic, Jesuit.

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1600’s

Roman Catholic, in Latin

Alcazar, Luis – Vestigatio Arcani Sensus in Apocalypsi  1619

Alcazar (1554–1613) was a Roman Catholic,Spanish Jesuit.

“The praeterist view… is said to have been first promulgated in anything like completeness by the Jesuit Alcasar, in his “Vestigatio Arcani Sensus in Apocalypsi” (1604).  Very nearly, the same plan was adopted by Grotius. The next great name among this school of interpreters is that of Bossuet the great antagonist of Protestantism.” – Henry Alford, as quoted by Ron Cooke 

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Anglicans

Grotius, Hugo – Annotationes In Novum Testamentum, vol. 8: Continens Annotationes In Epistolas Catholicas Et Iohannis Apocalypsin

Grotius (1583-1645) was an Arminian, Latitudinarian, Erastian, Anglican, who wrote a commentary on the whole Bible.

Hammond, Henry – A Paraphrase of RevelationAnnotations on the Revelation  The first 12 pages of the Annotations is ‘A Premonition Concerning the Interpretation of the Apocalypse’

Hammond (1605–1660) was an Arminian Anglican.

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Roman Catholic, in French

Bousset, Jacques – L’Apocalypse Avec Une Explication  1690

Bousset (1627-1704) was a Roman Catholic Bishop, supporter of the absolute Divine Right of kings and was an antagonist to Protestantism.

“In 1688, Jesuit-educated and Preterist, Bishop Bossuet dropped a bombshell on Protestants by publishing his scathing indictment of Protestantism, The History of the Variations of the Protestant Churches.  Bossuet’s purpose is so doing was to show the lack of unity and succession of Protestant doctrines through the ages (which the Calvinists claimed), unlike the unity and apostolic doctrines of the Catholic Church, thus fulfilling the promise of Jesus in Matt. 16:18. Using the Protestant belief (that there have always been believers who have held to their anti-Catholic doctrines) against them, he proposes arguments proving the unorthodox Christianity of all the groups Protestants claimed as forefathers.” – Rand Winburn

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Revelation:  Historicist Commentaries

1500’s

Bullinger, Henry – A Hundred Sermons upon the Apocalypse of Jesus Christ Revealed Indeed by the Angel of the Lord, but seen or received and written by the apostle and Evangelist St. John  1561

Bullinger (1504-1575), the reformer of Zurich, was reformed.

Bale, John – The Image of both Churches after the most wonderful and heavenly Revelation of St. John the Evangelist, containing a very fruitful exposition or paraphrase upon the same.  Wherein it is conferred with the other scriptures, and most authorized histories  d. 1563

Fulke, William – Prælections upon the Sacred and Holy Revelation of St. John  1573

Fulke (1538-1589) was a reformed Anglican.

Marlorate, Augustine – A Catholic Exposition upon the Revelation of St. John  (1574)

Daneau, Lambert – A Treatise Touching Antichrist, wherein the place, the time, the form, the workmen, the upholders, the proceeding, and lastly, the ruin and overthrow of the kingdom of Antichrist, is plainly laid open out of the Word of God: where also many dark, and hard places both of Daniel and the Revelation are made manifest  1589

Napier, John

Napier’s Narration: or an Epitome of his book on the Revelation.: Wherein are divers mysteries disclosed, touching the four beasts, seven vials, seven trumpets, seven thunders, and seven angels, as also a discovery of Antichrist: together with very probable conjectures touching the time of his destruction, and the end of the world. A subject very seasonable for these last times.  (London, 1641)

A Plain Discovery of the Whole Revelation of St. John set down in Two Treatises: the one searching and proving the true interpretation thereof: the other applying the same paraphrastically and historically to the text  1593

Napier (1550-1617) was reformed.  He was the mathematician who invented logarithms.

Gifford, George – Sermons upon the Whole Book of the Revelation  1599  

Gifford (1547-1600) was a Reformed puritan.

Junius, Francis 

Annotations on the Revelation of St. John  1599, in The New Testament of our Lord Jesus Christ: Translated out of Greek by Theodore Beza

The Apocalypse: A Brief and Learned Commentary upon the Revelation of St. John the apostle and evangelist, applied unto the history of the Catholic and Christian Church  1592

Junius was a major reformed figure of his day and a professor at the University of Heidelberg.

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1600’s

Cartwright, Thomas – A Plain Explanation of the Whole Revelation of St. John, very necessary and comfortable in these days of trouble and affliction in the Church  d. 1603

Symonds, William – By the Method of the Revelation, Presenting to Public View Those Cananites over whom our Lord Jesus Christ and his holy Church shall triumph after several battles. That which is past is showed in a brief Ecclesiastical history, containing most of the mutations which have befallen the Church, from the year of our Lord 97 unto the year 1603, as they have been showed unto St. John in Patmos, and recorded by such historiographers as are of least suspected faith  1605

Brightman, Thomas – The Revelation of St. John, illustrated with analysis and scholions, wherein the same is opened by the Scripture and the events of things foretold, showed by histories. Together with a most comfortable exposition of the last and most difficult part of the prophecy of Daniel.  Wherein the restoring of the Jews and their calling to the faith of Christ, after the utter overthrow of their three last enemies, is set forth in lively colors  d. 1607

Birghtman was a reformed puritan.

*  “Brightman’s admirers called him ‘the English Prophet,’ and this work they styled the ‘Apocalypse of the Apocalypse’; but it survives only as a noteworthy monument of the failure of the most learned to expound the mysteries of this book.  Elliott says ‘his Commentary is one of great vigor both in thought and language, and deservedly one of the most popular with the Protestant Churches of the time.'” – Spurgeon

Dent, Arthur – The Ruin of Rome: or, An Exposition upon the whole Revelation, wherein is plainly showed and proved that the popish religion, together with all the power and authority of Rome, shall ebb and decay more throughout all the churches of Europe…  d. 1607  EEBO

Dent (1533-1607) was reformed and a puritan.

Broughton, Hugh – A Revelation of the Holy Apocalypse  1610

Broughton (1549-1612) was a reformed Anglican.

Forbes, Patrick – An Exquisite Commentary upon the Revelation of St. John, wherein both the course of the whole book, as also the more abstruse and hard places thereof not heretofore opened; are now at last most clearly and evidently explained  1613

Forbes (1564-1635) was reformed.

Bernard, Richard – A Key of Knowledge for the Opening of the Secret Mysteries of St. John’s Mystical Revelation  1617

Bernard was a reformed puritan.

Mason, Thomas – A Revelation of the Revelation, wherein is Contained a Most True, Plain & Brief Manifestation of the Meaning & Scope of all the Revelation, and of every mystery of the same, whereby the Pope is most plainly declared and proved to be Antichrist  1619

Mason (1580-1619?) was an Anglican clergyman and writer.

Pareus, David – A Commentary upon the Divine Revelation of the Apostle and Evangelist John  d. 1622  

Guild, William – The Sealed Book Opened: or, a Clear Explication of the Prophecies of the Revelation. Together with the lessons that are to be observed from every chapter thereof, being clearly explained. Intended chiefly for the discovery to all of that Roman Antichrist, and that Rome’s final destruction is surely at hand, by that blessed work of reformation happily begun in the several churches and kingdoms of Europe  1656

Holland, Hezekiah – An Exposition, or short, but full, plain and perfect epitome of the most choice Commentaries upon the Revelation…  Especially of the most learned and judicious authors, as Bullinger of Helvetia, Francis Junius, Thomas Brightman, Augustine Marlorate, Augustine’s de Civitate Dei, but especially (among many) the excellent and learned David Pareus. With several remarkable notes, observations & doctrines very profitable  1650

Holland was reformed.

Mede, Joseph

The Key of the Revelation, Searched & Demonstrated out of the Natural & Proper Characters of the Visions, with a comment thereupon, according to the rule of the same key, with a preface by Dr. Twisse  1643

This is Mede’s most famous work.

**  “There are several other works on the Apocalypse by this author, who, says Elliott, ‘was looked upon and written of as a man almost inspired for the solution of the Apocalyptic mysteries.  Yet I think his success was at first over-estimated as an Apocalyptic expositor.'” – Spurgeon

Remains on Some Passages in the Revelation  1650

Durham, James – A Learned and Complete Commentary upon the Book of the Revelation   EEBO  Buy  d. 1658

Durham (1622-58) was a Scottish covenanter and writes in the historicist school of interpretation, which was the nearly universal view of the Scottish covenanters, along with the Reformation and puritan era.

** – ‘After all that has been written, it would not be easy to find a more sensible and instructive work than this old-fashioned exposition.  We cannot accept its interpretations of the mysteries, but the mystery of the gospel fills it with sweet savor.’ – Spurgeon

Hicks, William – Apokalypsis Apokalypseos, or, The Revelation Revealed, being a Practical Exposition on the Revelation of St. John  (London, 1659)

Hicks (1621-1660) was an English puritan.

Muggleton, Lodowick – A True Interpretation of all the Chief Texts & Mysterious Sayings and Visions Opened of the Whole Book of the Revelation of St. John, whereby is unfolded and plainly declared those wonderful deep mysteries and visions interpreted concerning the true God, the alpha and omega, with variety of other heavenly secrets, which has never been opened nor revealed to any man since the creation of the world to this day, until now  1665

Not Recommended:  Muggleton (1609–1698) was an English religious thinker who gave his name to Muggletonianism, a Protestant sect which was always small, but survived until the death of its last follower in 1979.  He spent his working life as a journeyman tailor in the City of London and was imprisoned twice for his beliefs.  He held opinions hostile to all forms of philosophical reason, and had received only a basic education.  He encouraged quietism and free-thought amongst his followers, whose beliefs were predestinarian in a manner that was distinct from Calvinism.

More, Henry

Apocalypsis Apocalypseos, or, The Revelation of St. John the Divine Unveiled, containing a brief but perspicuous and continued exposition from chapter to chapter, and from verse to verse, of the whole book of the Apocalypse  1680

An Illustration of those Two Abstruse Books in Holy Scripture: the Book of Daniel & the Revelation of St. John, by continued, brief but clear notes, from chapter to chapter, and from verse to verse: with very useful and apposite arguments prefixed to each chapter, framed out of the expositions of Dr. Henry More  (London, 1685)

Paralipomena Prophetica, containing Several Supplements and Defences of Dr. Henry More, his expositions of the Prophet Daniel and the Apocalypse, whereby the impregnable firmness and solidity of the said expositions is further evidenced to the world.  Whereunto is also added Phililicrines upon R.B., his notes on the Revelation of St. John  (London, 1685)

More (1614-1687) was an Arminian, Latitudinarian Anglican.

Poole, Matthew – Critical Synopsis of the Bible: Revelation, 3 vols.  Buy

This is different and much larger than Poole’s Annotations on Scripture.  Here Poole gives something of a history of interpretation (from Jewish writers until Christian interpreters of Poole’s own day) on every verse of the Bible.

‘…you will find in Poole’s Synopsis a marvelous collection of all the wisdom and folly of the critics.  It is a large cyclopedia worthy of the days when theologians could be cyclopean, and had not shrunk from folios to octavos.  Query—a query for which I will not demand an answer—has one of you beaten the dust from the venerable copy of Poole which loads our library shelves? 

Yet as Poole spent no less than ten years in compiling it, it should be worthy of your frequent notice—ten years, let me add, spent in Amsterdam in exile for the truth’s sake from his native land.  His work is based on an earlier compilation entitled Critic Sacri, containing the concentrated light of a constellation of learned men who have never been excelled in any age or country.’ – Spurgeon

A French Minister – A New System of the Apocalypse, or, Plain & Methodical Illustrations of all the Visions in the Revelation of St. John, written by a French minister in the year 1685 & finished but two days before the dragoons plundered him of all, except this treatise  1688

Knollys, Hanserd

An Exposition of the Whole Book of the Revelation  1689  255 pp.

Knollys was a baptist.  The Great Whore of Revelation in ch. 17 is said to be the Papacy and all national Churches (Episcopal, presbyterian, etc.).

Apocalyptical Mysteries, Touching the Two Witnesses, the Seven Vials, and the two kingdoms, to wit, of Christ, and of Antichrist, expounded. Wherein is contained some things necessary for the saints in this present generation to know  (London, 1667)

Anon. – The Book of the Revelation Paraphrased; with Annotations on Each Chapter. Whereby it is made Plain to the Meanest Capacity  (London, 1693)

Cradock, Samuel – A Brief and Plain Exposition and Paraphrase of the Whole Book of the Revelation  1696

**  “Dr. Doddridge and Job Orton were very fond of this old author.  We are not.” – Spurgeon

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Revelation: Historicism – On the Major Prophetic Portions of Revelation

1600’s

Comenius, Johann – The Revelation Revealed, by Two Apocalyptical Treatises, showing: 1. How near the period of the time is wherein the mystery of God shall be fulfilled.  2. What things are already fulfilled, and what shall shortly follow thereupon, as they are foretold in the Revelation.  Translated out of High-Dutch  1651  Has introductory letters by Samuel Hartlib and John Dury.  This work especially treats of ch. 16.

Comenius was reformed, see Wiki.

Sherwin, William – A Scheme of the Whole Book of the Revelation of Jesus Christ, of very great use: with the following summary of Daniel’s Visions, etc., for the right understanding of the parallel of that Book and the Revelation after[wards] Set Down  (London, 1671)

Sherwin (1607-1687?) was an Anglican minister who held to Christ personally reigning on earth for the millennium (not recommended).

Hayter, Richard – The Meaning of the Revelation, or, a Paraphrase with Questions on the Revelation of the Holy Apostle and Evangelist John the Divine in which the synchronisms of Mr. Joseph Mede, and the Expositions of other interpreters are called in question, and a new exposition given of the prophecies of the Revelation, never heard of before, nor extant in any author whatsoever, from the sixth chapter to the eighteenth, with variety of reasons for the exposition  1675

Hayter was a laymen of unknown theological persuasion.  See DNB.

Jurieu, Pierre – The Accomplishment of the Scripture Prophecies, or, The approaching deliverance of the Church, proving that the Papacy is the Antichristian Kingdom…  that the present persecution may end in three years and-half, after which the destruction of Antichrist shall begin, which shall be finished in the beginning of the next age, and then the kingdom of Christ shall come upon earth  (London, 1687)

Jurieu (1637-1713) was a French, reformed minister and professor of theology and Hebrew at Sedan; he was a grandson of Pierre Du Moulin and was a prolific author.

The revocation of the Edict of Nantes occurred in 1685, which virtually obliterated the reformed Church from having a public face in France.  Jurieu, in this work, predicted that the overthrow of the Papal Antichrist would take place in 1689.  The classic Huguenot historian, H.M. Baird, said that “this persuasion, however fanciful the grounds on which it was based, exercised no small influence in forwarding the success of the designs of William of Orange in the invasion of England,” which resulted in the English, Glorious Revolution in 1689.

Cressener, Drue – A Demonstration of the First Principles of the Protestant Applications of the Apocalypse, Together with the Consent of the Ancients Concerning the Fourth Beast in the 7th of Daniel & the Beast in the Revelations  (London, 1690)

Cressener (1642?-1718) was an Anglican clergyman and theological writer, known as an interpreter of the Apocalypse.

Fleming, Robert – An Epistolary Discourse Concerning the Rise and Fall of Antichrist  1694  200 pp.

Fleming covers many of the chapters in Revelation and their interpretation in his Discourse.

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Revelation:  Historicism – Chapters in Revelation

Phelpes, Charles – A Commentary, or an Exposition with Notes on the Five First Chapters of the Revelation of Jesus Christ  (London, 1678)

We do not have any bio info on Phelpes (fl.1670-1682).

Marlorate, Augustine – An Exposition of Revelation 1 & 13  d. 1560

Marlorat (1506-1562) was reformed.  His commentaries are particularly valuable as they are compendiums of block quotes from some of the best reformed divines of his day on the passages of that particular Biblical book.  See here for an excerpt from his commentary on John.

**“Marlorate was an eminent French reformer, preacher and martyr.  His commentaries contain the cream of the older writers, and are in much esteem, but are very rare.  He wrote on the whole New Testament, but we have in English only the Gospels [2-3 John] and Jude [and Revelation 1 & 13].” – Spurgeon

Perkins, William – A Godly and Learned Exposition or Commentary upon the Three First chapters of the Revelation. Preached in Cambridge  1595

More, Henry – An Exposition of the Seven Epistles to the Seven Churches together with a Brief Discourse of Idolatry, with Application to the Church of Rome  1669

More (1614-1687) was an Arminian, Latitudinarian Anglican. 

Traheron, Bartholomew – An Exposition of the 4th Chapter of St. John’s Revelation… in sundry readings before his countrymen in Germany. Where in the providence of God is treated with an answer made to the objection of a gentle adversary  1558

Traheron (1510?-1558?) was reformed and was a reformer of the Church of England and an exile under Bloody Mary.

Cowper, William – Patmos: A Commentary on the Revelation of St. John, chapters 4-7  1619

Cowper (1568-1619) was reformed.

**  “The simple piety and vigorous style of Cowper have preserved his old-fashioned work, and will preserve it.” – Spurgeon

Burton, Henry – The Sounding of the Two Last Trumpets, the Sixth & Seventh, or Meditations by way of Paraphrase upon the 9th, 10th & 11th Chapters of the Revelation, as containing a Prophecy of these Last Times  (London, 1641)

Burton was an Independent, English puritan.

Du Moulin, Pierre – The Prophecies contained in Rev. 1112, 13, 14, 17, 18and prophecies scattered throughout the Apocalypse speaking of the Pope and his seat  1613

Burton, Henry – The Sounding of the Two Last Trumpets, the Sixth & Seventh, or Meditations by Way of Paraphrase upon the 9th, 10th & 11th Chapters of the Revelation, as containing a prophecy of these Last Times  1641

Burton (1578-1648) was a reformed puritan. 

Guild, William – Antichrist… the Popes of Rome proven to be that Man of Sin…  1655  See chs. 4-6, 8, 11, 13-15 regarding Rev. 9, 13 & 17-18.

Hooke, William – A Discourse Concerning the Witnesses, Relating to the Time, Place, & Manner of their Being Slain  (London, 1681)  48 pp.

Hooke (1600 or 1601-1678) was an Anglican clergyman and domestic chaplain to Oliver Cromwell.  He was born in London and graduated from Oxford, and spent several years in New England as a pastor.  He returned to England in 1656, becoming the domestic chaplain and advisor for his friend Oliver Cromwell and running the Savoy hospital.  He remained an advisor to Cromwell’s son Richard until the collapse of the Protectorate.  He published several tracts and sermons.

T.P. – A Sober Guess Concerning Several Dark Prophesies in the Revelation, especially the 11th Chapter, Extracted out of Several Authors, Expositors on the Apocalypse  (London [1662])

T.P. was a minister of the Gospel and references reformed writers.

“These two Witnesses prophecying, were not two individual persons, Enoch and Elias, as Bellarmine and other Papists affirm: But a succession of holy men, not in private, but in public station, stirred up all that time to testify the truth of Christ against Antichrist.

By the two Witnesses in general are meant (says Mr. Mede) all the interpreters and assertors of divine truth, who should by their daily complaints bewail the foul and lamentable pollution of Christs Church:  And in particular it is conceived by the two Witnesses to be meant (say learned expositors) the faithful teachers and governors of the Church, both ecclesiastical and political: More especially say the London Ministers in their Jus Divinum Ministerii Anglicani) the true ministers of Jesus Christ, who are called Witnesses of Christ, Acts 1:8, and whose proper office it is to bear witness to truth and holiness, against all heresies, blasphemies, idolatries and ungodliness of Antichrist.

To these witnesses power is given, i.e. authority and commission; yea, the power of Christ is bestowed upon them, by which they are enabled not only to pray and to mourn, but to prophesy, not so much by prediction of things future, as by preaching the everlasting Gospel.  It was a mighty power from on high that a few condemned, persecuted ministers should have gifts to be able, and power to be couragious to preach against the Son of Perdition, when all the world wondered after the beast.” – pp. 143-144

I.E. – The Two Olive Trees: or, The Lord’s Two Anointed ones, which always stand before Him, the ruler of the whole earth, Zech. 4, described also Rev. 11, by the names of Two Witnesses, Two Olive Trees, two candlesticks, two prophets.  And showing what they are in their own true nature, differing from all the new fancied ones, and in what manner they always prophesy.  How they are said to finish their testimony.  How they were to be killed by the Beast, and when. How long their corpse should lie in the streets of the Beast’s great city, dead and unburied.  And when the spirit of life from God should enter into them, and they stand upon their feet again.  And what great things should follow after the same to the end, and thence for ever.  (London, 1645)

Herbert, William – A Letter Written by a True Christian Catholic, to a Roman pretended Catholic wherein upon occasion of controversy touching the Catholic Church the 12th, 13th, and 14th Chapters of the Revelation are briefly and truly expounded, which contain the true estate thereof, from the birth of Christ to the end of the world  1586

William Herbert (1553-1593).

Du Moulin, Pierre – The Prophecies contained in Rev. 1112, 13, 14, 17, 18and prophecies scattered throughout the Apocalypse speaking of the Pope and his seat  1613

Taylor, Thomas – Christ’s Victory Over the Dragon: or Satan’s Downfall, showing the Glorious Conquests of our Savior for his Poor Church, against the Greatest Persecutors. In a plain and Pithy Exposition of the Twelfth Chapter Revelation. Delivered in sundry lectures… Perfected and finished a little before his death  1632

Taylor (1576-1632) was a reformed puritan.

Marlorate, Augustine – An Exposition of Revelation 1 & 13  d. 1560

Marlorat (1506-1562) was reformed.  His commentaries are particularly valuable as they are compendiums of block quotes from some of the best reformed divines of his day on the passages of that particular Biblical book.  See here for an excerpt from his commentary on John. 

**“Marlorate was an eminent French reformer, preacher and martyr.  His commentaries contain the cream of the older writers, and are in much esteem, but are very rare.  He wrote on the whole New Testament, but we have in English only the Gospels [2-3 John] and Jude [and Revelation 1 & 13].” – Spurgeon

Wilkinson, John – An Exposition of the 13th Chapter of the Revelation of Jesus Christ  1619

Cotton, John – An Exposition upon the 13th Chapter of the Revelation  d. 1652

Cotton was one of the leading early New England puritans.  He was a historicist.

Guild, William – Antichrist… the Popes of Rome Proven to be that Man of Sin…  1655  see chs. 4-6, 8, 11, 13-15 regarding Rev. 9, 13 & 17-18.

I.W. – A Discovery of the Beasts, being an Exposition of the 13th Chapter of the Revelation of Jesus Christ: wherein all True Christians (yet in Babylon) are Admonished to Come out, and the anti-Christians Foretold what their Plagues will be  ([London] 1641)

The author interprets the Antichrist to be the rise and continuation of the Papacy, the traditional protestant view.  The work appears to be helpful.

Burton, Henry – The Seven Vials or a Brief and Plain Exposition upon the 15th and 16th Chapters of the Revelation, very pertinent and profitable for the Church of God in these Last Times  1628

Burton (1578-1648) was a reformed puritan. 

Parker, Robert – The Mystery of the Vials Opened: being a Short Exposition upon the Pouring out of the Four Last Vials Mentioned in the 16th Chapter of the Revelation: wherein diverse things relating to times present, past & to come are discovered: as the ruin of Antichrist and the several degrees thereunto; and the shadowing out these times wherein we live are generally surveyed  (London, 1650)  EEBO says the work is by ‘John Parker’, but this appears to be an error.

Parker (c.1564–1614) was an English Puritan clergyman and scholar.  He became minister of a separatist congregation in Holland where he died.  Cotton Mather wrote of Parker as “one of the greatest scholars in the English Nation, and in some sort the father of all Nonconformists of our day.”

Cotton, John – The Pouring out of the Seven Vials, or, An Exposition, with Application of the 16th Chapter of the Revelation  1642  EEBO

Cotton was one of the leading early New England puritans.  He was a historicist.

Comenius, Johann – The Revelation Revealed, by Two Apocalyptical Treatises, showing: 1. How near the period of the time is wherein the mystery of God shall be fulfilled.  2. What things are already fulfilled, and what shall shortly follow thereupon, as they are foretold in the Revelation.  Translated out of High-Dutch  1651  Has introductory letters by Samuel Hartlib and John Dury.  This work especially treats of ch. 16.

Comenius was reformed, see Wiki.

Du Moulin, Pierre – The Prophecies contained in Rev. 1112, 13, 14, 17, 18, and prophecies scattered throughout the Apocalypse speaking of the Pope and his seat  1613

Garrett, Walter – Demonstratio Luculenta, Nova, or, A New Method of Demonstrating that Rome Christian (and not, Heathen) is the Woman, called ‘Babylon’, in the 17th Chapter of the Revelation  (1700)

Guild, William – Antichrist… the Popes of Rome proven to be that Man of Sin…  1655  see chs. 4-6, 8, 11, 13-15 regarding Rev. 9, 13 & 17-18.

Sherwin, William

The Saints’ First Revealed & Covenanted Mercies, Shortly Approaching: As being the main scope of Revelation-Prophesy; opened & resolved by Christ’s Divine Key of Prophesy in the Four Last Chapters Thereof  (London, 1676)  12 large pages

Sherwin (1607-1687?) was an Anglican minister who was a Chilialist, holding to Christ personally reigning on earth for the millennium (not recommended).

Chronoi Apykatastaseåoz Panton, or, The Times of Restitution of all Things with their near approach upon the ruin of the Beast: manifest by two Tracts on Rev. 20:5 & Rev. 21:5 containing the main scope of all Revelation prophecy…  which said two last tracts may fitly be Entitled, An Alarm to this Present World…  (London, 1675)

Baillie, Robert – On Rev. 20, ‘The Thousand Years of Christ’s Visible Reign
upon Earth, is Against Scripture’  1645  71 paragraphs, being ch. 11 of his Dissuasive from the Errors of the Time

Hall, Joseph – The Revelation Unrevealed Concerning the Thousand-Years Reign of the Saints with Christ upon Earth.  Laying forth the weak grounds and strange consequences of that plausible and too-much received opinion…  (London, 1650)

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