The Active Obedience of Christ

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Order of Contents

Articles
Books
Quote

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Articles

1600’s

Burgess, Anthony – Section 5, Sermons 29-45  of Part 2 of The True Doctrine of Justification in 2 Parts  (London, 1651), pp. 284-456

Rutherford, Samuel – ‘Of Christ’s Active and Passive Obedience, how they concur as one satisfaction’  being pp. 229-230 of The Covenant of Life Opened  1655

Brown of Wamphray, John – ‘Imputation of Both Christ’s Active and Passive Obedience Necessary’  †1679  being the Appendix to The Life of Justification Opened

Brown was an exiled Scottish covenanter writing from the Netherlands.

Turretin, Francis –   ‘Chapter 4 – The Matter of the Atonement’  †1687  29 pp.  in On the Atonement, pp. 85-114

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1900’s

Berkhof, Louis – Christ’s Active and Passive Obedience  1950  9 paragraphs  from his Systematic Theology

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2000’s

Gootjes, Nicolaas – ‘Christ’s Obedience and Covenant Obedience’  2002  20 pp.

Gootjes is a professor in the Canadian Reformed Churches.

Berends, Bill – ‘Christ’s Active Obedience in Federal Theology’  Vox Reformata (2004), 20 pp.

“My preliminary conclusions…  is that the doctrine of the active obedience of Christ may first have been discussed under the rubric of a prelapsarian covenant by Theodore Beza.” – p. 27

Berends’ main thesis about Beza is in general accordance with the findings of Campos’s later, more thorough dissertation below.

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Books

de Campos, Junior, Heber Carlos – Johannes Piscator (1546-1625) and the Consequent Development of the Doctrine of the Imputation of Christ’s Active Obedience  PhD diss. Calvin Theological Seminary, 2009  370 pp.

“…this dissertation does point to Beza as…  possibly even the first systematizer of the doctrine under study, since he demonstrates his threefold righteousness imputed as early as his first edition of the Annotationes Maiores (1556) and a detailed discussion of the topic soon appears in his Confession (1559). ” – p. 286

“…the assignment of precise labels (favorable to the doctrine/against the doctrine) in the history of the doctrine of the imputation of Christ’s active obedience becomes possible only after Piscator raised his voice against Beza.  In short, there was no early consensus against which Piscator argued.  Doctrinal consensus, limited as it was, arose only after the debates of the early seventeenth century.” – p. 287

“…the beginnings of doctrinal formulation of the issue occurred in the 1550s and 1560s, and that significant debate over the doctrine became common only in the 1580s and 1590s…” – p. 292

McCormick, Micah – The Active Obedience of Jesus Christ  2010  PhD diss., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary

Abstract:  “Chapter 1 defines the doctrine, surveys previous literature, offers warrant for the work, and previews the argument of the work.  In short, the thesis of this work is that the active obedience of Christ is a biblical doctrine.  Chapter 2 presents a historical survey, tracing theologians from the early church up to the present time to see the development of the doctrine. Special attention is given to the Reformation and Post-Reformation eras, during which the doctrine received its primary development…”

Strange, Alan – The Imputation of the Active Obedience of Christ in the Westminster Standards  Buy  in Explorations in Reformed Confessional Theology  (RHB, 2019)  179 pp.

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Quote

John ‘Rabbi’ Duncan

“The atonement…  the whole of Christ’s obedience unto death.”

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Related Pages

The Atonement