The Three Points of Common Grace

Below is a summary of the three points of Common Grace, followed by the three points in full, as defined by the Christian Reformed Church in 1924

 

 

A Summary of the 3 Points

1.  In addition to the saving grace of God, shown only to those who are elected to eternal life, there is also a certain favor, or grace, of God shown to his creatures in general.

2.  Since the fall, human life in society remains possible because God, through his Spirit, restrains the power of sin.

3.  God, without renewing the heart, so influences human beings that, though incapable of doing any saving good, they are able to do civil good.

 

 

The 3 Points in Full

Point 1

Concerning the favorable attitude of God toward mankind in general and not only toward the elect, the Synod declares that it is certain, on the ground of Scripture and the Confession, that there is, besides the saving grace of God, shown only to those chosen unto eternal life, also a certain favor or grace of God which He shows to all His creatures. This is evident from the quoted Scripture passages and from the Canons of Dordt II, 5, and III and IV, 8 and 9, where the general offer of the Gospel is discussed; while it is evident from the quoted declarations of Reformed writers of the period of florescence of Reformed theology, that our Reformed fathers from of old have championed this view.

 

Point 2

Concerning the restraint of sin in the life of the individual and in society, the Synod declares that according to Scripture and Confession, there is such a restraint of sin. This is evident from the quoted Scripture passages and from the Belgic Confession, Art. 13 and 36, where it is taught that God through the general operations of His Spirit, without renewing the heart, restrains sin in its unhindered breaking forth, as a result of which human society has remained possible; while it is evident from the quoted declarations of Reformed writers of the period of florescence of Reformed theology, that our Reformed fathers from of old have championed this view.

 

Point 3

Concerning the performance of so-called civic righteousness by the unregenerate, the Synod declares that according to Scripture and Confession the unregenerate, though incapable of any saving good (Canons of Dordt, II, IV, 3), can perform such civic good. This is evident from the quoted Scripture passages and from the Canons of Dordt, III and IV, 4, and the Belgic Confession, where it is taught that God, without renewing the heart, exercises such influence upon man that he is enabled to perform civic good; while it is evident from the quoted declarations of Reformed writers of the period of florescence of Reformed theology, that our Reformed fathers from of old have championed this view.

 

 

 

See Also

Bible Verses on Common Grace and the Sincere Free Offer of the Gospel

Historic Reformed Quotes on Common Grace

John Calvin Quotes on Common Grace

The Westminster Standards and Divines on Common Grace

 

 

Related Page

Common Grace