Free Church of Scotland

Free Church of Scotland big

The first Free Church of Scotland General Assembly, May 23rd, 1843

Thomas Chalmers, Moderator

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Principles of the Free Church of Scotland

The Church in Relation to its Constitution2006, 12 pages, by Sherman Isbell

Isbell describes the European understanding of a constitution and argues that a church’s constitution is inviolable and cannot be changed

A Brief Summary of the Majority Opinion in the Free Church of Scotland on Covenantingby Travis Fentiman, 2014, 13 points, 20 paragraphs 

A succinct summary of the Biblically principled, majority historic view of the Solemn League and Covenant and the Revolution Settlement of 1690

A Defense of the Majority Opinion in the Free Church of Scotland on Covenanting, by Travis Fentiman, 2014, 36 points, 135 paragraphs, with a select annotated bibliography

This is an extensive articulation and defense of the majority historic view on the Solemn League and Covenant, argued from scripture, history and the reformation in Scotland.

Principles of the Free Church of Scotland, by William Cunningham, 1863, p. 257, 32 pages, from his Discussions on Church Principles, ch. 10, 1863, 565 pages, 

The Right of Continued Protest, by the Free Church of Scotland (Continuing) Legal Advice and Property Committee, 2011

See also Quotes on the Right of Continued Protest

Theonomy and the Confession of Faith: Report of the General Assembly of the Free Church of Scotland, 1998, 35 paragraphs

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Free Church Writings

A Bibliography of the Free Church of Scotland, 1895, p. 298, 50 pages, by Norman Walker, chapter 18 from his Chapters from the History of the Free church of Scotland, one of the Thomas Chalmers’ Lectures

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History of

A Bibliography of the Disruption, page 21, three pages, from The Free Presbyterian Magazine, vol. 48, June, 1943 

Chapters from the History of the Free Church of Scotland, 1895, 396 pages, by Norman Walker, one of the Thomas Chalmers’ Lectures

Disruption Times, p. 289, 25 pages, by John Kennedy, chapter 13 from his biography of Rev. Dr. M’Donald, the ‘Apostle of the North’ 

Answer to the Declaratory Statement of 1892 in the Free Church of Scotland, part 1part 2, HTML, by John Kennedy, with the five paragraph Declaratory Act at the beginning.  The Declaratory Act of 1892 in the Free Church was a declaration of the Church’s interpretation of the Westminster Confession under five points, some of which taught against the Confession itself.  The intent of the Act was to open the door to union with the broader United Presbyterian Church.  The Declaratory Act, not being of a constitutional nature, but only a current interpretation of the constitution, did not materially change the constitution.  Thus the conservatives, bound by their unaltered constitutional vows to the constitution of the church, stayed in the church, though two ministers left and formed the Free Presbyterian Church of Scotland.  The foreseen union between the United Presbyterian Church and the Free Church took place in 1900 and the United Free Church was formed.  The Constitutionalists stayed out of the unconstitutional union, continued the Free Church of Scotland, and repealed the Declaratory Act in 1905. 

The Introduction of Instrumental Music into the Worship of the Free Church Unscriptural, Unconstitutional and InexpedientHTML, no date, 29 paragraphs, by John Kennedy 

The Story of the Scottish Church: from the Reformation [1560] to the Disruption [1843]  Buy  1875, specifically chapters 10-12, p. 537, 30 pp.

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Biographies of Free Church of Scotland Men

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Documents of 

The Practice of the Free Church of Scotland, 1995, 8th edition, paginated, this is the Book of Church Order of the Free Church, otherwise known as the Blue Book

 The Claim, Declaration and Protest, 1842

The Protest of the Free Church of Scotland, 1843 

Judgments of the House of Lords

Churches (Scotland) Act, 1905 

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View from America

Spurgeon in Scotland, from the Monthly Record of the Free Church of Scotland, Aug., 1958, including his impressions of a Free Church General Assembly and of John Kennedy’s Free Church in Dingwall.

The Scotch Assemblies, 1880, p. 12, 19 pages, by R.L. Dabney, an American southern presbyterian, from his Discussions, vol. 5, mainly consisting of his impressions of the Free Church.

Refutation of Professor W. Robertson Smith, 1890, p. 399, 40 pages, by Robert L. Dabney, from his Discussions, vol. 1.  W. Robertson Smith (1846-1894) was a liberalizing professor in the Free Church College, who came under a heresy trial in the Free Church for teaching contrary to the inerrancy of scripture and was consequently deprived of his professorship in 1881.

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“The Free Church is dearer to me than myself.”

“I rejoice in being a member of a Free Church, but I rejoice still more in being a member of the catholic church of the Lord Jesus.”

John ‘Rabbi’ Duncan

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