Repentance

“Jesus began to preach, and to say, Repent: for the kingdom of heaven is at hand.”

Matt 4:17

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Order of Contents

Articles
Quote

On Making Confession of Sins
The Relation of Repentance to Faith & Justification
On Forgiveness

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Articles

1600’s

Welch, John – ‘On Repentance’ Sermons 3-10 on Rev. 2  †1622  in 48 Select Sermons  PoD

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1800’s

Colquhoun, John

A View of Evangelical Repentance from the Sacred Records  Buy  1825

‘The Difference Between True and Counterfeit Repentance’  8 points in 37 paragraphs, from his Evangelical Repentance

‘A Word to the Impenitent’  7 points in 10 paragraphs, from his Evangelical Repentance

‘The Fruits and Evidences of True Repentance’  10 points in 14 paragraphs, from his Evangelical Repentance

Buchanan, James – New Birth Repentance and Faith  1847, 10 paragraphs, from The Office and Work of the Holy Spirit

Hodge, Charles – ‘Faith and Repentance’  from his Way of Life, chs. 6 & 7

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1900’s

Berkhof, Louis – Conversion  1950, 31 paragraphs, form his Systematic Theology

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2000’s

Beeke, Joel – ‘Escape for Your Life’  condensed from a sermon preached on Sept. 16th, 2011, 16 paragraphs

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Quote

John ‘Rabbi’ Duncan

“We…  have cause to fear, not that the kingdom of God should become extinct, but lest it should be taken from us, and given to a nation that would bring forth the fruits of it.”

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On Making Confession of Sins

Intro

James 5:16 says, ‘Confess your faults one to another, and pray one for another, that ye may be healed.’

If we sin against another, we ought confess that sin to the person we sinned against, and pray for each other.  If we commit private sins, or feel the weight of our sinfulness, it is also good to confess that to other trusted brothers or sisters in the Lord in order to find help.

Romanism, through time, twisted this Biblical teaching into one being obligated to use a confessional to a ‘priest’, with the attendant corruptions of sacramentalism and the ‘priests’ forgiving people’s sins.

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Article

Ussher, James – ‘Of Confession’ & ‘Of the Priest’s Power to Forgive Sins’  †1656  75 pp.  being chs. 4 & 5 of Answer to a Jesuit and other Tracts on Popery, pp. 74-149

In the context against Romanism, Ussher surveys the Early Church on the confession of sin and how this turned into the Romanist bondage of the Confessional.

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The Relation of Repentance to Faith & Justification

Ball, John – 2nd Pt., Ch. 5, p. 349  of A Treatise of the Covenant of Grace  (London, 1645)

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On Forgiveness

William Perkins

The Whole Treatise of the Cases of Conscience…  (Legat, Univ. of Cambridge, 1606), bk. 3, ch. 3, question 1, ‘How may a man carry himself in respect of injuries and offences done unto him?’, pp. 492-3

“First in general; It is demanded how a man should and ought to forgive an injury?

Answer:  In forgiveness there be four things:

The first is forgiveness of Revenge, that is of requiting evil for evil, either by thought word or deed.  This must always be practiced.  For vengeance is not ours, but the Lord’s, and great reason then that we should ever-more forgive in regard of revenge and ha­tred.  This the apostle teaches, when he says, 1 Cor. 13:5, Love is not provoked, it never thinks, much less speaks or does, evil.

The second is forgiveness of private pu­nishment; which is, when men return punish­ment for injuries done in way of requital; and this must always take place with us, because as vengeance itself, so also punishment in way of revenge is God’s alone.

The third is, forgiveness of judgment, when we judge an injury done to be an injury.  This judgment we are not bound to forgive unto men.  For we may with good conscience judge a sin and a wrong to be as they are.  And yet notwithstanding, if a man make satisfaction for the wrong done, then there ought to be forgiveness, even in regard of judgement.

The fourth is forgiveness of satisfaction.  This we are not alway[s] bound to remit, but we may with good conscience, alway[s] require satisfaction where hurt is done.”

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Ought One to Forgive a Brother who does not Repent?  Yes.

Samuel Rutherford

The Due Right of Presbyteries…  (1642), pt. 1, ch. 1, section 1, p. 16

“But I answer, the place 2 Cor. 2:10 is controverted, and we doubt not, but [that it is] of that same nature with the power of excommunicating, 1 Cor. 5:4.  But for private forgiving, it is not the Church-forgiving here meant, because:

1.  The private forgiving is a duty of charity commanded in the Law of Nature to all, even out[side] of [a] Church-state, and obliges the excommunicate[d], who, though they be cast out of the Church, are not exempted from the Law that binds all, Mt. 6:12,14-15; Mt. 5:44-45, but the Church-forgiving is an act of obedience to a positive Church-Law of Christ.

2.  Private Christians are to forgive their enemies whether they repent or not, even as Christ forgave those who crucified Him, Col. 3:13; Lk. 23:34; and when the party repents not, this forgiveness is not ratified in Heaven, yet are we obliged to forgive and to commit vengeance to God;

But the authoritative forgiving is a thing that the Church is not obliged unto, absolutely; nor may they, or can they forgive, except the offender repent: and if they see that he repents not, they cannot lawfully forgive; but, being in God’s room, must take vengeance on all disobedience, and their retaining of sin and forgiving is valid in Heaven, because they are in God’s place.

Now any forgiving or retaining of sin but these two, together with God’s forgiving and retaining, we know not.  But Peter’s forgiving his offending brother seventy times seven times, is common to all private Christians, even out[side] of [a] Church-state…”

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“Repentance is not a sweet and convenient little confessional, rather,according to Thomas Brooks, ‘Repentance is the vomit of the soul.'”

Gavin Beers, Verbum Dei Minister
Free Church of Scotland (Continuing)

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